540 Tasting Notes

drank 2016 Teadontlie by White2Tea
540 tasting notes

It seems I already drank most of this sample but when, I don’t know. Based on my lack of notes, I may have found this sheng unforgettable at worst.

I brewed half of what was left in my mini gaiwan. This tea has a great aroma – incredible dry florals – but I found it to be lacking in texture. It’s a very lofty tea, hanging out in my sinuses and head without much happening taste-wise on the tongue. The most prominent parts of the tea besides the aroma are its distinctly floral bitterness and the long-lasting floral-fruity aftertaste with a note of buttery apricot preserves. Astringency is present early but fades away.

Overall, I find the tea to be mostly floral and refined but not for me. It’s anxiety-inducing and has given me a slight headache, both of which I have experienced from highly floral aromatic sheng before. I’d suggest reading others’ positive reviews.

Flavors: Apricot, Astringent, Bitter, Butter, Floral, Fruity

Preparation
Boiling 4 g 2 OZ / 60 ML
Martin Bednář

It doesn’t sound like tea for me, if it is anxiety-inducting :/

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My craving for a highly oxidized Taiwanese red oolong came late this year. I remember drinking a bunch of it around Thanksgiving in 2018 while picking persimmons from my aunt’s tree. The tree was pruned heavily this year so it didn’t produce anywhere near 300 fruits and therefore she didn’t need my assistance with harvest.

I’ve never tasted longan, the fruit for which this tea is named. To me, this tea tastes of overripe persimmon with no astringency. I hit the leaf with boiling water and was greeted with a balance between its nectar-syrup like body, deep fruity-floral-spicy-cocoa aroma and tastes, and a lingering perfume in the mouth. I was able to get only 4 infusions in gongfu before I had to carry on with my day, so the following day I dumped the leaves in a jar for grandpa and it was still as delicious if not more so. Certainly a tea I’d consider purchasing again. Thanks, Togo!

Preparation
Boiling 6 g

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drank PG Tips by PG Tips
540 tasting notes

The one day I took this to work last week, I happened to be speaking to the British expat who was heating a kettle for Yorkshire Tea. He commended me on my choice and now thinks I drink British teas. But I don’t, really. Holy crap, this has to be the strongest English Breakfast I’ve ever had. Two bags steeped very short, like 1.5 minutes, in my thermos. Well smack me in the face and punch me in the gullet, I had to nurse that brew for 12 hours. This is the kind of tea I imagine was dumped in Boston Harbor. I’d take Yorkshire over PG Tips any day. It’s too much for me of the ‘no dairy added’ persuasion.

Flavors: Dark Wood, Heavy, Malt, Tea

Preparation
Boiling 1 min, 30 sec 20 OZ / 591 ML
gmathis

(Chuckling.) I love the stuff, but I totally get your point of view! Side note … one of my Sunday girls (6th grader) knows I am a teaist, and on a family trip to Boston, brought me back a packet of tea that was purported to have been historically researched and as close to Boston Harbor as possible. Can’t remember the name at the moment, but it was quite good and nowhere near as strong as PG Tips!

gmathis

OK … had to look at old notes … Congou by Oliver Pluff & Company.

derk

Huh, I may have to try that someday. How kind of your student :)

ashmanra

I was given some Oliver Pluff from Colonial Williamsburg. I think it is sold in Charleston, too.

Leafhopper

This is the tea I drank when I was a coffee person. And yes, it is strong.

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drank 2008 Red Robe by Liquid Proust Teas
540 tasting notes

Haha! I misrepresented the number of teas in my cupboard the other day. I probably have another 20-30 from a Liquid Proust group buy in late 2018. Is this really the first one I’m sampling from the Aged Oolong category? I was going to post this under Random Steepings, but I figured Liquid Proust needs some more cred on this site, especially considering his devotion to the leaf and the enthusiasm to spread teas aimed for the Eastern market far and wide.

Dry, warm and rinsed leaf aromas are fairly strong with dark chocolate with raspberry filling, modest roast, caramel, brown toast, dark brown sugar, hints of cherry and red currant. Once brewed, the aroma is mellow with berries, spice and cocoa. The taste is mostly woody and somewhat drying but there’s more going on than I can articulate. Not much change throughout the infusions, of which I was able to pull eight or nine. Late in the session I let a cup cool and a pleasant mineral sweetness came forward with salivation. The spice tone was also more noticeable, while a light unripe peach aftertaste did its thing. Roast notes were not at the forefront with this tea, more of a muted background deal.

I like it even though nothing about it stands out in particular. It’s mellow and calming enough to be a daily evening drinker without much attention having to be paid.

Song pairing: David Bowie — Heroes
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D5tDielKLMc

Preparation
Boiling 6 g 3 OZ / 100 ML
mrmopar

Tea hoarder….. :P

derk

Who me?? No way.

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First session with this tea. I bought it a few years ago and it has sat in a sealed jar since then.

Rich and tangy dry leaf scent with impressions of oak, smoke, berries, spices, currants, dark chocolate, pine. It reminds me of both a mulled wine and a smoky scotch. The reroast is the dominant vibe once brewed, integrating well with a berry and spice tone. Taste of ash, especially in the back of the mouth. Alkaline, some umami. I noted an early aroma of caramel and hazelnut with fleeting wet wood ash.

There’s a milky feel in the mouth after the swallow that slowly morphs into a throaty astringency and a drying, unripe peach skin aftertaste that lasts the entire session. I also notice tobacco and wood cask tones. Feel good, calm, with a light camphor effect deep in my chest. The tea quickly grows into a dry woodiness. I was able to pull only 6 infusions from the leaf (really only 4 that were worth it).

Other reviewers find this to be a favorable tea. I’m not sure how I feel about it yet. There’s a dominant ash taste and an alkaline bitterness to it that are a bit grating. Maybe the reroast is too much for me despite it not being a sharp, fresh flavor. Otherwise, the tea has a balanced, mellowed profile. It is tonal rather than possessing specific tastes.

Preparation
Boiling 6 g 3 OZ / 100 ML
Kawaii433

I like this one but I like the Wild Da Hong Pao from Wu Yi Shan Rock Oolong Tea Spring 2018 a LOT more. I’ve been drinking them both off and on but jury is still out whether I’ll change the rating. Usually reluctant to change my original rating, sometimes it depends on my mood hehe.

derk

Ha, I recently found myself changing ratings often but not review content. I’ve given up on ratings, makes things easier for me. I like the Wild DHP so much more!

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My housemate brought home a 30-muslin sachet box of this from her employer’s tea drawer. Best before 12/2012; it’s 01/2020.

It’s clearly a victim of neglect. Very light red fruit-cream aroma and taste. No discernible green tea flavor. Very drying.

Going to drop the box in the work tea cupboard. Somebody else might appreciate it or throw it out secretly.

Preparation
190 °F / 87 °C 3 min, 0 sec 8 OZ / 236 ML
Leafhopper

How sad that such a pricy tea was so neglected. I tried the black version over Christmas and really enjoyed it.

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drank Green Tea by Triple Leaf Tea
540 tasting notes

Found this in the kitchen. This company wraps their teabags in paper. I have no idea how old it is. For reference, the oldest teas I’ve found in the kitchen were Best Before 2012. It’s January 2020.

The recommended parameters for this chopped-leaf tea include boiling water. I opted for 175F.

Very clear yellowish brown, almost shimmering in my glass. Little to no aroma. The tastes are mild and all-encompassing for a green tea. It has some nuttiness, grassiness, minerality, citric brightness, a hint of apricot and florals that come in and out. Glassy-viscous mouthfeel that finishes clean and drying.

Sub-220 teas. Finally.

Preparation
175 °F / 79 °C 2 min, 0 sec 8 OZ / 236 ML

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Holy crap I love this tea. It fits me like a good pair of pants.

Summer 2018 harvest, gongfu.

The fragrance and the way it carries into the mouth and lingers is on point. A caramel sweetness is suspended loftily by intense creamy white floral perfume maybe with orange blossom, the kind of heady scent that relaxes you. The deeper notes of the tea are distinctly sandalwood, nuts, musk and banana leaf. Great body with mineral brightness and salivation. Later, a succulent white peach aftertaste develops as the strength of the florals subsides. The finished cup smells so strong and sweet. Initial violet floral bitterness and vegetal-woody astringency grow ever stronger with each steep, eventually numbing the tongue. While I find those qualities to add depth to the experience, if there is one thing to turn others away, it’s the combination of growing bitterness and astringency. That and the low brewing temperature, which is a necessity. And the price. And the lack of availability. Shucks.

I wonder why it’s called Moondrops.

Preparation
175 °F / 79 °C 0 min, 15 sec 5 g 3 OZ / 100 ML

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Watery lemon and ginger and little licorice and turmeric. It wasn’t bad, just super watery for steeping 1 bag in a mug for 15 minutes. Why so weak? The bag smelled so promising.

Preparation
Boiling 8 min or more 8 OZ / 236 ML

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March 2019 harvest.

The best morning/afternoon Assam I’ve ever had. Very complex and layered taste and mouthfeel yet approachable due to a distinct lack of bitterness, very light astringency and an inviting aroma. Savory and mineral backbone with plenty of berry tones and a lemony taste that zings. Emergent menthol. The leaves are alive and have plenty to give.

I would serve this to anybody entering my home.

Not for small pocketbooks but well worth a try! It’s very forgiving :)

Leafhopper

Agreed on all points. I’m hoarding my remaining 20 g.

derk

I gave away my last teaspoon or two. The rest of it I blew through like an addict. You are stronger than me!

Leafhopper

LOL, that was generous! I nearly made a What-Cha order just to get more of this tea and the Rohini Second Flush Darjeeling. I’ll probably repurchase both of them if they’re still available in a few months.

derk

It’s on sale right now whyyyyyy

Leafhopper

Argh! That’s dangerous! I need to remind myself that I’ve acquired 38 teas in the past couple months and I don’t need more! The current Taiwan Tea Crafts sale is also making me waver.

derk

I’ve been on an anti-hoarding mission since my last What-Cha order in 2019. I wish you the strength to not succumb to TTC but sipping vicariously through you is always welcome ;)

Leafhopper

Thanks! The struggle is real. I’ve been enjoying your recent adventures with tisanes, although most of them seem better to read about than to drink.

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Profile

Bio

Always up for a trade. I keep an updated cupboard. Check it out. Don’t be shy — message me if you want to try something! I send international :)

Most enjoyment:

Wuyi and Taiwanese oolong, sheng puerh, Yunnan and Wuyi blacks, GABA oolong. I also appreciate Japanese, Vietnamese, Thai, Darjeeling and Nepali teas, bagged tea and herbal teas/tisanes.

I take my teas without milks or sweeteners except sometimes chai and the rare London Fog, matcha latte and golden milk.

I’ll try anything once because it helps me learn. Not opposed to well placed herbs, flowers, fruity bits and flavorings, just nothing cloying. And no added sugars, sweeteners, candy or chocolate.

I abandoned both my preference reference and the recording of detailed steeping parameters in January 2020, favoring a focus on qualitative descriptions. At this point, I am still comfortable toggling the “Not/Recommended” button.

Preference reference:

100-90: A tea I can lose myself into. Something about it makes me slow down and appreciate not only the tea but all of life or a moment in time. If it’s a bagged or herbal tea, it’s of standout quality in comparison to similar items.
89-80: Fits my profile well enough to buy again. Some could be daily drinker teas.
79-70: Not a preferred tea. I might buy more or try a different harvest. Would gladly have a cup if offered.
69-60: Not necessarily a bad tea but one that I won’t buy again. Would have a cup if offered.
59-1: Lacking several elements, strangely clunky, possess off flavors/aroma/texture or something about it makes me not want to finish.
Unrated: Haven’t made up my mind or some other reason. If it’s puerh, I likely think it needs more age.

Location

Sonoma County, California, USA

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