63
drank Orange Peach by Tetley
1546 tasting notes

Don’t let the name fool you, it’s an hibiscus tea (a hibiscus tea?).

But it’s pleasant enough. Aroma is mostly tangy hibiscus and citrus, some peach and a cinnamon base note. I think I might get some of that dried apple, too, or it might be an association with the cinnamon aroma. This tea is BRICK RED, hibiscus is the first ingredient after all. Tart and tangy but not overly so, I get orange and floral peach flavorings that taste a bit contrived, very light cinnamon and apple and I think the chicory gives a hint of a roasted bass note. Lingering tart aftertaste. This might be better cold-brewed and I wonder, despite my preference for not sweetening teas, if a little sugar would help that peach pop. Now that I’m typing this review, I’m noticing a surprising cooling sensation coming up from my esophagus. Whoa. Must be one of the “natural flavors.” I like but it’s odd.

So, one neat thing about this tea is the design of the bag. When I first looked at it, I thought, “What is all this string about?” Then I looked at the back of the envelope where there were instruction printed on how to use the teabag. The string is one of those that you’re supposed to pull out of the bag, know what I mean? but there’s a perforated tag at the top joining both the ends of the string. When you’re done steeping, you tear the paper tag and pull both ends outward and that draws more string out of the bag, squeezing the teabag in the process. While it’s not a tight squeeze, it’s pretty handy for those that feel compelled to squeeze the last drops of life from… teabags… but don’t have a spoon or don’t want to use their fingers.

That was a really long and wordy explanation. There’s probably a 3-second Youtube video showing the process more efficiently than reading that novel :P

So yeah, the tea, it’s ok. Too bright to be sipping on near midnight, though.

Preparation
Boiling 5 min, 0 sec 8 OZ / 236 ML
Todd

Sounds tasty. I would say “a hibiscus tea” if you pronounce the “h” like an American, “an ’ibuscus tea” if you pronounce it like a Brit. :)

Martin Bednář

Well, I guess it is just okay-ish fruit tea bag.

derk

Martin: that’s about how I feel.

gmathis

Ever yank the string completely out of those confounded teabags?

derk

Half the time they seem to be made for the sipper of delicate touch.

Martin Bednář

I just prepared this one today and I have to agree with everything you wrote. Even with rating, I find it bit bland, slightly acidic, nothing distinctive. For evening okay, for daily drinking not so good.

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Comments

Todd

Sounds tasty. I would say “a hibiscus tea” if you pronounce the “h” like an American, “an ’ibuscus tea” if you pronounce it like a Brit. :)

Martin Bednář

Well, I guess it is just okay-ish fruit tea bag.

derk

Martin: that’s about how I feel.

gmathis

Ever yank the string completely out of those confounded teabags?

derk

Half the time they seem to be made for the sipper of delicate touch.

Martin Bednář

I just prepared this one today and I have to agree with everything you wrote. Even with rating, I find it bit bland, slightly acidic, nothing distinctive. For evening okay, for daily drinking not so good.

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Bio

This place, like the rest of the internet, is dead and overrun with bots. And thus I step away.

Eventual tea farmer. If you are a tea grower, want to grow your own plants or are simply curious, please follow me so we can chat.

I most enjoy loose-leaf, unflavored teas and tisanes. Teabags have their place. Some of my favorite teas have a profound effect on mind and body rather than having a specific flavor profile. Terpene fiend.

Favorite teas generally come from China (all provinces), Taiwan, India (Nilgiri and Manipur). Frequently enjoyed though less sipped are teas from Georgia, Japan, Nepal and Darjeeling. While I’m not actively on the hunt, a goal of mine is to try tea from every country that makes it available to the North American market. This is to gain a vague understanding of how Camellia sinensis performs in different climates. I realize that borders are arbitrary and some countries are huge with many climates and tea-growing regions.

I’m convinced European countries make the best herbal teas.

Personal Rating Scale:

100-90: A tea I can lose myself into. Something about it makes me slow down and appreciate not only the tea but all of life or a moment in time. If it’s a bagged or herbal tea, it’s of standout quality in comparison to similar items.

89-80: Fits my profile well enough to buy again.

79-70: Not a preferred tea. I might buy more or try a different harvest. Would gladly have a cup if offered.

69-60: Not necessarily a bad tea but one that I won’t buy again. Would have a cup if offered.

59-1: Lacking several elements, strangely clunky, possess off flavors/aroma/texture or something about it makes me not want to finish.

Unrated: Haven’t made up my mind or some other reason. If it’s pu’er, I likely think it needs more age.

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California, USA

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