It’s been a while since I’ve had this one.

It’s a bit more sour than last I remembered— I recall previously tasting something fruity, like persimmons, with a sweet smokiness in the aftertaste. It seems about the same now, except with a hint of sourness/tartness and a slightly thinner mouthfeel. I don’t know if it’s because it’s allergy season and my tastebuds are unhappy or if it’s the result of a year and a half of poor storage on my end— my shu setup is much worse than my sheng since I only have one minifridge/hygrometer (used for the sheng, which seems to be going along reasonably well) so it’s been sitting alongside a small dish of water in a giant plastic storage box that I occasionally pull the lid off for several hours to allow for some ventilation and airflow. I’ll have to check some of the older shus I have in there later. Hopefully I figure out what’s going on.

Cwyn

Your storage might be fine, and in fact woke up the tea to continue fermenting those fruity lighter leaves. Older CNNP shou is rather coveted and in fact has an excellent reputation. Maybe just needs more storage from the drier Kunming years.

uhuang

That’s what I’m hoping. I have the laziest pu’er storage system ever, just a sturdy weatherproof plastic storage box, a bit of water or a well wrung paper towel for occasional moisture (mostly during arid winters), and semiregular airing during humid summer months. I tried out another (slightly older and I think more fermented) shu from the box that I’ve also had for about a year and it seems to have stayed relatively stable, which I think is a good sign.

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Cwyn

Your storage might be fine, and in fact woke up the tea to continue fermenting those fruity lighter leaves. Older CNNP shou is rather coveted and in fact has an excellent reputation. Maybe just needs more storage from the drier Kunming years.

uhuang

That’s what I’m hoping. I have the laziest pu’er storage system ever, just a sturdy weatherproof plastic storage box, a bit of water or a well wrung paper towel for occasional moisture (mostly during arid winters), and semiregular airing during humid summer months. I tried out another (slightly older and I think more fermented) shu from the box that I’ve also had for about a year and it seems to have stayed relatively stable, which I think is a good sign.

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Bio

I have far too many interests. Tea is one of them.

Background in bioethics, medical anthropology, and evolutionary biology with aspirations of eventually going into a medical field. I also have strong interests in theater, computer science, and food (which shouldn’t be particularly surprising).

Brewing
Brewing method is usually Western style for black teas (2-3 minutes at near-boiling), “grandpa style” for shu pu’ers and longjing, and gongfu (with a gaiwan) short steeps for sheng and shu pu’ers (two 5-second rinses, then 5, 10, 15-second steeps with a gradual increase in steep times to taste). The gaiwan is also used for oolongs though I sometimes use a brew basket if the gaiwan is occupied and I’m taking a break from pu’er.

Preferences
I enjoy black teas, pu’er, and oolongs (leaning towards aged, cliff/Wuyi, or roasted/dark), depending on my mood. I don’t usually drink green tea but do enjoy a cup every so often.

Ratings
My rating methods have changed over time and as a result, they’re very inconsistent. For the most part, as of 11 November 2014, unless a tea is exceptional in some way (either good or bad), I will refrain from leaving a numerical rating.

The final iteration of my rating system before I stopped (note: I never did get around to re-calibrating most of my older notes):
99 & 100: I will go to almost any lengths to keep this stocked in my cupboard.
90-98: I’m willing to or already do frequently repurchase this when my stock runs low.
80-89: I enjoy this tea, and I may be inclined to get more of it once I run out.
70-79: While this is a good tea, I don’t plan on having it in constant supply in my tea stash.
50-69: This might still be a good tea, but I wouldn’t get it myself.
40-49: Just tolerable enough for me to finish the cup, but I don’t think I’ll be trying it again any time soon.
Below 40: Noping the heck out of this cup/pot.

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