Taiwan Shan Lin Xi Black Tea

Tea type
Black Tea
Ingredients
Black Tea Leaves
Flavors
Bark, Blackberry, Brown Sugar, Cherry, Cinnamon, Cocoa, Eucalyptus, Floral, Forest Floor, Geranium, Ginger, Honey, Lemon, Lemongrass, Malt, Menthol, Mineral, Muscatel, Nutmeg, Orange, Osmanthus, Pine, Rainforest, Raspberry, Rose, Smooth, Spicy, Spring Water, Sweet, Tangy, Tannin, Tea, Vanilla, Wood
Sold in
Bulk, Loose Leaf
Caffeine
Not available
Certification
Not available
Edit tea info Last updated by derk
Average preparation
Not available

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2 Tasting Notes View all

  • “derk wrote such a well-crafted, detailed, accurate tasting note for this, I definitely can’t improve on it, but a few additional observations: a) It holds up to my sloppy, ham-handed handling....” Read full tasting note
  • “One small western cup left so it’s time to write a note! July 2020 harvest. Off the bat, the dry leaf scent recalls a memory. Pulling English ivy down from eucalyptus trees growing on steep...” Read full tasting note

From What-Cha

Another high mountain Taiwanese black, it has a smooth floral taste with sweet hints and balsam notes.

The tea is quite light compared to typical black teas with a pleasant sweetness and not any malt or astringency.

A limited edition tea produced in very small quantities, I’ve ordered 1kg this year and probably will not be able to order any more until 2021 due to the limited seasonal nature.

Tasting Notes:
- Very smooth texture
- Complex taste which evolves
- Floral quality with notes of citrus, fruit and nut which develop with subsequent steeps

Harvest: Summer, July 2020

Origin: Shan Lin Xi, Nantou, Taiwan

Altitude: 1400-1500m

Cultivar: Qing Xin

Sourced: Direct from a Taiwanese wholesaler

Brewing Advice:
- Heat water to roughly 90°C/194°F
- Use 2-3 teaspoons per cup/small teapot
- Brew for 3-4 minutes

Packaging: Resealable ziplock bag

About What-Cha View company

Company description not available.

2 Tasting Notes

2456 tasting notes

derk wrote such a well-crafted, detailed, accurate tasting note for this, I definitely can’t improve on it, but a few additional observations:

a) It holds up to my sloppy, ham-handed handling. That’s saying something for a (borrowed phrase) “snoot tea” :)

b) I would never associate menthol or cooling properties to an unflavored black tea, but it has and it does.

c) It just flat smells lovely.

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1117 tasting notes

One small western cup left so it’s time to write a note! July 2020 harvest.

Off the bat, the dry leaf scent recalls a memory. Pulling English ivy down from eucalyptus trees growing on steep slopes in one of the coolest and dampest forested areas in San Francisco. A gem of a place, unvisited beyond a handful of local residents and the homeless who carved caves out of the Himalayan blackberry that had overgrown the lower slope of the area.

Do yourself a favor and brew this gongfu. Western steeps for me were too fickle. Some days they’d be a little too ‘tea’-like. Another time was one of the richest, sweetest cups I’d ever had. Every other time I was like, “This is some good tea, but it’s missing something?”

Gongfu is more consistent and offers a more explosive ginger/chili/menthol heating-cooling and intense honey-brown sugar returning sweetness. I find the aroma is more complex than the taste, especially so when it comes to the retronasal activity of the aftertaste, but not to any detriment. It all works together very well. There’s a ton of bug-bitten (is the elevation too high for this to happen?) juicy richness to this tea being a summer harvest, along with some classic baking spice-cinnamon. Plenty of rosewood and a hint of smooth malt in the bottom notes and rose florality higher up. Enough tannins to keep the flavor from being a sugar bomb. The aftertaste really blooms with those spiced honey notes and fruity muscatel-grape must tones. The session ends on a bright note with plenty of lemon pulp and malt-wood to the taste. I feel like I’m drinking an actual tea bush from the misty slopes of Shanlinxi (there goes my imagination again). This tea has terroir. Sorry for using a tea snoot word, but it’s true.

Dang. Taiwan puts out some amazing black teas.

Flavors: Bark, Blackberry, Brown Sugar, Cherry, Cinnamon, Cocoa, Eucalyptus, Floral, Forest Floor, Geranium, Ginger, Honey, Lemon, Lemongrass, Malt, Menthol, Mineral, Muscatel, Nutmeg, Orange, Osmanthus, Pine, Rainforest, Raspberry, Rose, Smooth, Spicy, Spring Water, Sweet, Tangy, Tannin, Tea, Vanilla, Wood

Leafhopper

You’ve made me want to try my 25 g package of this tea!

gmathis

This does sound nice.

derk

Hope you enjoy, Leafhopper :)

Daylon R Thomas

Now you’ve encouraged me to write about this one too. I’ve been avoiding it because of the fickleness and I’m not sure how to write about it without it being boring. I personally liked the Li Shan Black more since this feels more like an early fall kindof tea than an everyday one. The tannins are a little too strong or drying for me western if I over leaf it, but works out okay if I am careful with the leaf when I tumbler it for 4 g. Gong fu was a lot more complex-I would get a mix of blackberry, honey, spices, wood and a weird “orange and purple” vibe with it-like there’s a mix of orange and purple fruits in the taste that I couldn’t peg down exactly. Either way, your note nails it and was fun to read!

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