Nepal Jun Chiyabari 'Himalayan Bouquet' Oolong Tea

Tea type
Oolong Tea
Ingredients
Oolong Tea Leaves
Flavors
Anise, Bitter, Chocolate, Citrus, Cookie, Dandelion, Floral, Flowers, Honey, Honeysuckle, Malt, Orange Blossom, Walnut, Wood, Almond, Butter, Dry Grass, Drying, Green Wood, Hops, Lemon Zest, Mineral, Orange, Round , Straw, Toast, Umami, Vanilla, Grass, Herbs, Rose, Violet
Sold in
Loose Leaf
Caffeine
Not available
Certification
Organic
Edit tea info Last updated by derk
Average preparation
185 °F / 85 °C 1 min, 0 sec 5 g 4 oz / 123 ml

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6 Tasting Notes View all

  • “[Winter 2017 harvest] The tasting notes for this tea have been more or less covered. It is a very floral, dry tea that seems to have a lot in common with the more floral of Dan Congs. In fact, I...” Read full tasting note
    80
  • “I was more than a little stressed out by the end of work today. Come home, vent to my housemate, put on pajamas, open the kettle. Teatender, give me an oolong, something floral and sunny that’ll...” Read full tasting note
    89
  • “This is a good mood tea. Some teacher blues, and this made my night a little sunnier. I like this both Western and Gong Fu, and the orange blossom, green grape, mid sip grain note, honeysuckle, and...” Read full tasting note
    93
  • “Keeping the Nepalese tea train going, I spent last night working my way through a sample pouch of this delicious oolong. At this point, I only have 4 grams left and I intend to use those for a...” Read full tasting note
    92

From What-Cha

A hand-rolled oolong from one of Nepal’s most famous producers Jun Chiyabari, with a smooth floral taste of orange blossoms accompanied by a crisp finish.

Tasting Notes:
- Highly aromatic
- Smooth texture
- Floral orange blossom notes with a crisp finish

Harvest: First Flush, April 2016
Invoice: J18B-2016

Origin: Jun Chiyabari Tea Garden, Hile, Dhankuta district, Nepal
Organic: Certified organic by IMO Switzerland
Altitude: 1,600-2,000m
Sourced: Direct from Jun Chiyabari

Brewing Advice:
- Heat water to roughly 85°C/185°F
- Use 2 teaspoons per cup/small teapot
- Brew for 2 minutes

About What-Cha View company

Company description not available.

6 Tasting Notes

80
447 tasting notes

[Winter 2017 harvest]

The tasting notes for this tea have been more or less covered. It is a very floral, dry tea that seems to have a lot in common with the more floral of Dan Congs. In fact, I think it is too floral for me, there’s not that many occasions I imagine craving this tea. Or more precisely, the issue I have with it is that there doesn’t seem to be all that much beyond the floral notes.

The dry leaf aroma seems to be a mix of cookies, star anise, chocolate, and wood; while wet leaves smell mostly of malt, citrus, and honey. Furthermore, there is an elderberry flower scent rising from the empty cha hai. The taste is savoury, bitter, and floral, with dominant notes such as honeysuckle, walnut, dandelion, all of which were already mentioned by other reviewers. Aftertaste is then sweeter and quite dry. This is where the advertised orange blossom seems to appear as well. Body is medium to light and the mouthfeel is very coating.

Flavors: Anise, Bitter, Chocolate, Citrus, Cookie, Dandelion, Floral, Flowers, Honey, Honeysuckle, Malt, Orange Blossom, Walnut, Wood

Preparation
190 °F / 87 °C 1 min, 0 sec 4 g 5 OZ / 150 ML

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89
542 tasting notes

I was more than a little stressed out by the end of work today. Come home, vent to my housemate, put on pajamas, open the kettle. Teatender, give me an oolong, something floral and sunny that’ll knock me down for a few hours. Himalayan Bouquet? Okay.

November 2017 harvest.

I went through my notes then perused the reviews. Daylon R Thomas’s grandpa brew (see the second of his three notes for this tea) was very similar to my experience gongfu. I don’t have anything new to offer when it comes to brewing it hot besides some additional tastes listed below. Cold-brewed, though, was such a floral blast it gave me a headache. Tread lightly if you enjoy floral oolong but are sensitive to them like me. I’ll stick to hot infusions. Good stuff. Beautiful oxidized green-brown-red leaf to boot.

Flavors: Almond, Bitter, Butter, Dandelion, Dry Grass, Drying, Floral, Green Wood, Honey, Hops, Lemon Zest, Mineral, Orange, Orange Blossom, Round , Straw, Toast, Umami, Vanilla, Walnut, Wood

Preparation
175 °F / 79 °C 5 g 3 OZ / 100 ML
LuckyMe

I find green oolongs taste too perfumey when cold brewed. I prefer them hot steeped myself. And that’s coming from someone who loves floral teas.

Daylon R Thomas

I used to cold brew the very last steeps of my gaoshan over night, and it’s worked well for those…granted, they were Lishans and Alishans at the end of their life. The Nepalese oolongs I’ve had tend to be astringent if over steeped anyway for me.

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93
1131 tasting notes

This is a good mood tea. Some teacher blues, and this made my night a little sunnier. I like this both Western and Gong Fu, and the orange blossom, green grape, mid sip grain note, honeysuckle, and violet combo is making love the crap out of this one. Also love the walnut and mega heavy dandelion notes.It pretty much has most of the qualities that I like in a greener oolong without being too green. I am tempted to get more, but I honestly want to savor this one over splerging on masses amount of it.

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92
876 tasting notes

Keeping the Nepalese tea train going, I spent last night working my way through a sample pouch of this delicious oolong. At this point, I only have 4 grams left and I intend to use those for a multi-step Western session either later today or sometime tomorrow. I will be sad to see this tea go. I have enjoyed it greatly, finding it to be a truly exceptional tea.

I prepared this tea gongfu style. After a very quick rinse, I steeped 6 grams of loose tea leaves in a 4 ounce gaiwan filled with 185 F water for 5 seconds. This infusion was chased by 14 additional infusions. Steep times for these infusions were as follows: 7 seconds, 10 seconds, 15 seconds, 20 seconds, 25 seconds, 30 seconds, 40 seconds, 50 seconds, 1 minute, 1 minute 15 seconds, 1 minute 30 seconds, 2 minutes, 3 minutes, and 5 minutes.

Prior to the rinse, the dry tea leaves emitted aromas of fresh flowers, butter, and wood. After the rinse, I was able to pick out distinct impressions of daisy, marigold, dandelion, chrysanthemum, and violet, as well as grass and straw. The first infusion brought all of previously mentioned bouquet components together, though I also began to pick up on a hint of rose. In the mouth, the tea emphasized a melange of well-integrated floral flavors balanced by grass, straw, butter, and wood. Subsequent infusions allowed the floral flavors to separate in the mouth as the notes of grass, straw, butter, and wood strengthened. Impressions of minerals, vanilla, malt, honey, lemon zest, orange, and herbs also appeared. The later infusions were dominated by mineral, grass, straw, wood, and herb notes, though I could still detect touches of dandelion, violet, and butter lurking in the background.

As oolongs go, this one was very straightforward, but the aromas and flavors on display worked beautifully together. Those violet and rose impressions were particularly impressive. There were times when I felt like I was consuming the liquid equivalent of a violet pastille, yet I was reminded of rosewater Turkish delights at others. It was simply breathtaking. This one is definitely deserving of a recommendation to fans of intensely floral teas.

Flavors: Butter, Dandelion, Floral, Grass, Herbs, Honey, Lemon Zest, Malt, Mineral, Orange, Rose, Straw, Vanilla, Violet, Wood

Preparation
185 °F / 85 °C 6 g 4 OZ / 118 ML
Daylon R Thomas

Jealy. That one went out of stock before I could grab it. I’m also very glad that Alistair has been showcasing so many Nepalese teas. I’ve started to find myself preferring them to some Chinese and Taiwaneese teas.

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