Himalayan Black Tartary Buckwheat Tea- Soba Tea From Daliangshan

Tea type
Herbal Tea
Ingredients
Not available
Flavors
Roasted Barley
Sold in
Loose Leaf
Caffeine
Caffeine Free
Certification
Not available
Edit tea info Last updated by TeaNecromancer
Average preparation
Boiling 3 min, 30 sec 8 oz / 236 ml

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3 Tasting Notes View all

  • “Water: 8oz Leaves: very tiny golden brown buckwheat Steep: 4m Aroma: Sweet & Wheaty Color: bright yellow Clarity: hint-cloudy Taste: With this tea i decided to go by my own brewing technique...” Read full tasting note
    80
  • “I received this tea as part of a sample from Teasenz. I’m not a big fan of roasted rice with green tea [Genmaicha] and so figured I wouldn’t like this one much. Wow was I surprised! I would say if...” Read full tasting note
    80
  • “There is nothing really exciting going on in my life at the moment, so instead of my usual introduction, I shall skip right along to the tea. By tea, I mean herbal tea, since this tea is in fact...” Read full tasting note
    98

From teasenz

Tartary buckwheat tea is not related to normal wheat. Unlike wheat, it’s not related to the grass family of plants. While it’s consumed for hundreds of years in China and other countries in Asia, it’s yet to be discovered in the West.

Origin Of Tartary Buckwheat Tea
Our special type of buckwheat tea (also known as ‘soba tea’ and ‘green buckwheat’) is from Daliangshan, hidden in the famous Hengduan Mountains that can be considered the world’s Mecca of this herbal tea type. This mountain area is situated 2000 to 3000 meters above sea level with a cold climate, fertile soil and sunshine all year round. These ideal environmental conditions results in a superior grade tartary buckwheat.

The Health Benefits of Tartary Buckwheat Tea
Even though black tartary buckwheat has an amazing taste, most people only discover this when they buy it for the health benefits.

Besides containing several mineral and vitamin B, buckwheat is famous for its rutin content that is also present in citrus fruits, berries and asparagus. Rutin helps against high blood pressure, arteriosclerosis (hardening of the arteries), and can even help prevent against different types of cancer.

Tartary buckwheat also contains choline, which is a vitamin B type that improves your metabolism and decreases cholesterol and blood pressure levels. This is why tea made from this low calorie herb is often part of a healthy diet.

Wholesale Tartary Buckwheat
You’re welcome to order soba tea at wholesale discounts starting from 200 gram. For bulk orders, please contact our sales team at info@teasenz.com and let us know your shipping location and quantity required. Like all our teas, Teasenz is able to provide international certifications required for importing in your country.

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3 Tasting Notes

80
121 tasting notes

Water: 8oz

Leaves: very tiny golden brown buckwheat

Steep: 4m

Aroma: Sweet & Wheaty

Color: bright yellow

Clarity: hint-cloudy

Taste: With this tea i decided to go by my own brewing technique instead of following the direct instructions. Using 8oz of water & 1tsp of buckwheat. The aroma shined once i opened the packet it was sweet & wheaty. I’ve been curious about buckwheat but never tried it till now. I also read else where you can eat them when your finish brewing tea. Pouring it in my cup it was nice i didn’t need a strainer because the tea gather in its own little cluster not moving as i poured. Only 2 pieces escaped the cluster falling into my cup. The color was bright yellow with a hit of cloudiness but i could see the bottom of my cup completely. Overall i found this to be not too surprising taste wise, just a nice simple cup of tea. I can see myself having it again.

Thank you Teasenz for this sample!

Preparation
Boiling 4 min, 0 sec 1 tsp 8 OZ / 236 ML

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80
36 tasting notes

I received this tea as part of a sample from Teasenz. I’m not a big fan of roasted rice with green tea [Genmaicha] and so figured I wouldn’t like this one much. Wow was I surprised! I would say if you like Houjicha [roasted sencha] tea type flavors or heck even if you like a bowl of cheerios then you should give this tea at least a taste! If you want something warm, but a little different from the normal tisane/tea fare then definitely try this gem.

The smell reminds me of cereal, specifically regular cheerios for whatever reason. The taste is similar to the smell but with more pronounced roastyness [yes I make up words]. Definitely a afternoon or mealtime type tea.

Flavors: Roasted Barley

Preparation
3 min, 0 sec 1 tsp 8 OZ / 236 ML
TeaNecromancer

Cheerios is such an apt description for this tea, it is like liquid cereal!!

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98
921 tasting notes

There is nothing really exciting going on in my life at the moment, so instead of my usual introduction, I shall skip right along to the tea.

By tea, I mean herbal tea, since this tea is in fact tea-less, Teasenz’s Himalayan Black Tartary Buckwheat Tea- Soba Tea From Daliangshan! If you are not familiar with Tartary Buckwheat (Fagopyrum tataricum) do not feel too bad, unlike its more well traveled cousin Common Buckwheat, this plant is pretty much not eaten this side of the world. So, hailing from the Hunagduan Mountains’ cold climate, here is some roasted seed tea! I am such a sucker for roasted and grainy smelling/tasting things, so this is going to be right up my alley. The aroma is is like a big bowl of cereal without the milk, like sweet roasted grain, baking bread, and honey. In fact, it honestly reminds me of Honey Nut Cheerios, a grain heavy aroma, but with a distinct honey sweetness.

So, writing about this made me think about it, so I am also drinking this tea while writing about it! Usually I do not do that, but it does happen sometimes. It doesn’t help that I am super sleepy and the idea of a toasty herbal tea just sounds perfect right now. So while my tea is steeping I shall write about the soggy buckwheats, their aroma is delicious. Seriously, it is like a blend of grain and nut butters, baking bread, and warmed honey being drizzled over said bread. You know those commercials that have someone sensually drizzling honey over baked bread and the image is so delicious you can practically smell it through the TV? It is one of those moments. The liquid is pretty sweetly fantastic too, not as strongly nutty, still some intense notes of cashews along with cereal and honey. Still reminds me of Honey Nut Cheerios, and I am totally ok with that.

I actually have been drinking this tea quite a bit since I got the samples, I am notoriously fond of having my last cup of tea be either roasted corn tea (Oksusucha) or Sobacha (roasted regular ol’ buckwheat tea) so I am actually drinking my last cup now, sad. One thing that really surprised me was how incredibly smooth it is, and thick, with an almost creamy mouthfeel. Someone drizzled honey over buttered bread it seems! I can’t stop comparing this to baked really heavily grainy bread (like the kinds that make the outrageous 20 different grains claim on their packaging, come on, at least 10 of those are different kinds of wheat) that I have been known to eat copious amounts of. Freshly baked and drizzled with honey, Tartary is sweeter and buttery-er, than common buckwheat, especially as it cools, which really brings out the sweetness. Also if you are feeling adventurous, taking a bit of honey and drizzling it over the now thoroughly cooked tartary makes for a tasty snack!

For blog and photos: http://ramblingbutterflythoughts.blogspot.com/2015/05/teasenz-himalayan-black-tartary.html

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