Heavenly Turn

Tea type
Oolong Tea
Ingredients
Not available
Flavors
Cocoa, Floral, Grain, Lily, Roasted Nuts, Sweet, Toast, Twigs, Woody, Almond, Apricot, Astringent, Caramel, Cedar, Cinnamon, Cotton Candy, Hay, Loam, Molasses, Mushrooms, Nuts, Peanut, Raspberry, Roasty, Sandalwood, Smoke, Strawberry, Tannin, Toasty, Tobacco, Toffee, Vanilla, Wood
Sold in
Loose Leaf
Caffeine
Not available
Certification
Not available
Edit tea info Last updated by beerandbeancurd
Average preparation
200 °F / 93 °C 3 g 7 oz / 200 ml

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4 Tasting Notes View all

  • “The evening of my flight to China, I clicked the China Airlines check-in link in my email. But I couldn’t check in. I tried again. And again. All packed up and ready to catch the bus to the...” Read full tasting note
  • “Started a nice chunk of days off with a session of this when I got home this morning… yesssss. On the steaming leaves — roast, toast, nuts, wood perfume, strawberry. I don’t think I found the...” Read full tasting note
    88
  • “My last tasting of a sample received in Fall 2020. 12/18/2020 mid morning bowl tea. Listening to Jazz and working in tandem. I’m very new to charcoal roasted oolong – very complex flavor. Rich. I’m...” Read full tasting note

From Global Tea Hut

Heavenly Turn is a beautiful charcoal-roasted, traditionally-processed oolong from Central Taiwan. Traditionally, oolong tea was oxidized between forty and seventy percent. Nowadays, a lot of oolong tea in Taiwan and elsewhere is lighter. They say that each stage of the tea processing should enhance the tea without leaving a trace of itself, so the roasting should not leave a roasty flavor in other words. This tea is roasted superbly, with a strong and bright aftertaste that lingers in the mouth for many minutes after you swallow.

It takes great skill to charcoal-roast a tea, as you must first master the fire. The same is true for using coals instead of electric heat for tea preparation—you cannot just set the temperature and relax. You have to first master the skill of selecting the right charcoal that won’t smoke, and then practice for years to master using the ash to control the temperature to the precise degree desired. Even then, the formula taught to you or refined from decades of experience won’t be applicable to this tea and this charcoal. You will have to monitor it carefully, which means you will also have to be very sensitive to the chemical changes in the tea and the corresponding appearance and aromas, examining and smelling the tea at regular intervals to know when to adjust the coals/ash and when the tea is roasted to the desired degree.

Heavenly Turn is uplifting, gentle and bright. It is flavorful, rich and opening. It nourishes the digestion and leaves you energized and satisfied. There are deep aromas that go on, luring you deeper into your cup after it is emptied and seeming to lead down a trail well beyond where your nose can travel.

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4 Tasting Notes

1551 tasting notes

The evening of my flight to China, I clicked the China Airlines check-in link in my email. But I couldn’t check in. I tried again. And again. All packed up and ready to catch the bus to the airport, I thought, “Oh, I’ll just check-in at the airport.” I grabbed my planner to put it in my backpack and leafed through it to double check my lists. Saw that my flight was for after midnight TODAY, SATURDAY, not for after midnight on SUNDAY. Holy shit, I missed my flight. Complete oversight. My excuse was that the week and a half prior to my departure, work was insane. It was prime-time building season here in California and the guy who carried the most weight between the four of us in the office took a different position.

I freaked. Hopped online to see what I could do but found it was too late and too expensive to book a flight on another airline. The next 24 hours was spent freaking. Phone calls back and forth to China Airlines’ different offices (US Los Angeles, which is closed on the weekend, Hong Kong, Taiwan), emails to the folks at One River Tea (the 15-hour time difference wasn’t helping!), talking to my seasoned-traveller aunt on the phone to help me get my head straight.

No room on the next flight out. I had to wait until Monday after midnight. But I had to jump through all these hoops and pay to change my flight. The trick was China Airlines’ LA office was closed on the weekend, and they were the only office that could take an American credit card. Hong Kong and Taiwan required some other form of payment through Alipay or WeChat. Oh awesome! Last week I had followed a YouTube tutorial on how to install Alipay on my American cellphone. Tried that with WeChat, too, several times, but it never sent me a confirmation code. I linked my bank card on Alipay and tried to put money into the account but nothing worked. WTF. How can I pay to rebook my flight?! Luckily Alex and Xiaoyan at One River Tea had woken up for the day and said they would use their WeChat to pay! But then I had to figure out how to tell the agent on the phone to send the payment request to a different phone in China. I don’t know how many times I was on/off the phone with China Airlines. Eventually, it worked.

I felt terrible for Alex and Xiaoyan, who had gotten a hotel room in Wuhan a few days before my scheduled arrival. They assured me they would wait there until I arrived. The only connecting flight out of Hong Kong on China Southern was booked, so I had to stay overnight at the Hong Kong airport hotel. Luckily I could pay at the counter with my American credit card for the leg from Hong Kong to Wuhan.

Anyway, I had my insulated stainless steel bottle with me on the flight. Taipei Taoyuan airport has all these filtered water stations where you can pick the temperature of your water. This is tea-drinking country! I dropped some nuggets into my bottle and filled with almost boiling water. This tea was so soothing and strong and resinous sitting there stewing in the heat. It kept me as awake as I could be following several near sleepless nights.

I tried the remaining amount of this tea at home a few times — once in a clay pot, once in a bowl — but I could never replicate the strength it provided while I was exhausted and crazed at the airport.

So thanks, beerandbeancurd, for providing something that gave me the strength to get through that mess! Tea and tea people are awesome.

ashmanra

Wow. Oh wow. I can not imagine having to handle that. You are amazing.

gmathis

DIY water temperature dispensers don’t exactly even out the other travel troubles, but wow!

Todd

whew, that is a lot! Glad you finally made it there! I’m heading to Chengdu via Tokyo on Tuesday, spending one night in Japan.

Martin Bednář

I am speechless. I could being in situation like that! I would freak out too. I know how time change can be annoying, especially in urgency. I am glad you made it, somehow.

Martin Bednář

Edit: I could not

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88
389 tasting notes

Started a nice chunk of days off with a session of this when I got home this morning… yesssss.

On the steaming leaves — roast, toast, nuts, wood perfume, strawberry. I don’t think I found the strawberry last time. Sweet and light little whiff.

First steep smelled of almonds. A little thin on layers here, maybe should have steeped it longer. Second cup was an oily, swirling pour. Here it comes… the nose on these juicy little buckets is so full: redwood, raspberry, hay, mushroom and loam, sweet and light spices like snickerdoodles. Cedar. Tastes, finally, of strawberry, with a sweet nose as it’s sipped — perfectly ripe and plump.

Third opens up to smoke, wood, tobacco, vanilla, toffee. The scents are just so much bigger than the mouth. I don’t mind. I taste apricot now.

More smoke and wood perfume in the fourth steep… peanuts, some astringency, caramel, cotton candy(!) and molasses. Some more pronounced tannins after that, with caramel, and it started to get watery around steep 6 or 7.

Like sitting under a stick lean-to by a forest pond, burning marshmallows and incense into a lazy fog.

Flavors: Almond, Apricot, Astringent, Caramel, Cedar, Cinnamon, Cotton Candy, Hay, Loam, Molasses, Mushrooms, Nuts, Peanut, Raspberry, Roasty, Sandalwood, Smoke, Strawberry, Tannin, Toasty, Tobacco, Toffee, Vanilla, Wood

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34 tasting notes

My last tasting of a sample received in Fall 2020.
12/18/2020 mid morning bowl tea.
Listening to Jazz and working in tandem.
I’m very new to charcoal roasted oolong – very complex flavor. Rich.
I’m reminded of coffee. I’m reminded that darker roasted oolong should remain a staple in my collection. Chance just has it that this type of teas seems to dance well with graceful-lumbering jazz. What is a word that describes lumbering, but graceful?

Mmmm, this feeling of chocolate is pleasant.
I wish there was a way to categorize my cupboard in Steepster so I could group similar teas together – create “shelves”

Preparation
200 °F / 93 °C 3 g 7 OZ / 200 ML
White Antlers

An expression I love is the French ‘jolie laide’-which roughly translates to “beautiful-ugly.” It’s a term that embraces the unconventionally beautiful for whom we need a second look to fully recognize the charm of their oddities. So that could encompass ‘lumbering, but graceful.’

tea-and-music

Thank you for the offering! I think I’m after something slightly different. I want to describe the slow, bumbling of lumbering, but eloquence/grace as well. Maybe leisurely… The “ugly” aspect of jolie laide is the part I’m hesitant on. Either way, thanks again for the thought – and expansion of my vocabulary!

Cameron B.

I think leisurely is nice, or maybe deliberate?

tea-and-music

Thanks Cameron. Happy Holidays/Merry Christmas!

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