Honey Orchid "Milanxiang" 2019

Tea type
Oolong Tea
Ingredients
Oolong Tea Leaves
Flavors
Mineral
Sold in
Loose Leaf
Caffeine
High
Certification
Not available
Edit tea info Last updated by vallhallow
Average preparation
Not available

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4 Tasting Notes View all

  • “TTB This oolong tastes very mineral to me. I’m not getting much honey or floral notes from this one. It’s not bitter, but the minerality give it a bit of an astringent bite. Thanks for adding it to...” Read full tasting note
  • “TTB Review #56: If you’ve been following my TTB reviews, you’ll know that I’ve had a very volatile experience with “honey” teas. Fortunately, this one seems to have done it right. Definitely...” Read full tasting note
    75
  • “Holy smokes. If this tea tastes anywhere near as good as it smells it will be good. I apologize in advance if anything in this review doesn’t make sense. Nature hates me today. Something here in MN...” Read full tasting note
    94
  • “Preparation: Gong Fu Tasting Note: Opps, I didn’t realize that this tea recommended using 95C water instead of 100C so I think I may have messed this batch up a little bit. Oh well, it doesn’t...” Read full tasting note

From Cultivate Tea

大质山蜜兰香

Harvest
April 2019

Origin
Chaozhou, Guangdong

Milanxiang is a phoenix dancong oolong from Dazhi Mountain, the third highest peak in the Pheonix Mountains of Chaozhou.

The Chinese tea culture is inherited from Chaozhou gongfu-style tea. It is an integral part of people’s lives in Chaozhou. Under the eaves of every house and every shop, is a gongfu tea set: a simple and plain porcelain gaiwan, a round tea tray, three tea cups, and a pot of boiling water. Tea is drank first thing in the morning, after dinner in the evening, and throughout the day.

Fenghuang Mountain or Phoenix Mountain, located 30 km away from the city, has a long history of tea growing dating back to the Southern Song Dynasty (1127-1279). The oldest tea tree is still called “Song Zhong” and “Song King Tree”.

At the end of the Qing Dynasty (1644-1912), many people from the city of Chaozhou emigrated to Southeast Asia, and the tea merchants followed along. Phoenix oolong started to flourish as it represented the unique taste and flavor of their hometown.

The name phoenix dancong translates into “phoenix single grove”, referring to the way in which each varietal of phoenix dancong was created. A wild “mother tree” with its own distinct fragrance and taste is selected amongst the indigenous and ancient tea trees in Phoenix Mountain. It is then cloned through the process of grafting and propagation. After several generations of this cultivar propagation, there are now almost one hundred famous varietals of phoenix dancong, each with a unique fragrance and aroma. Most were named after the specific aromas, such as Gardenia, Magnolia, Jasmine.

Phoenix Mountain consists of several mountains and peaks, most of which extend into the clouds at the high altitudes of 800m above sea level. The most famous and prestigious producing region for Phoenix oolong is the neighboring Wudong Mountain. Most of the villages, at more than 1000m altitude, are immersed in the cloud and mist for two-thirds of the year.

This Milanxiang is from the prestigious Yinshui Cave 银水洞 in Dazhi Mountain 大质山, 1900 feet above sea level. The trees are approximately 20 years old.

Freshly picked tea leaves is withered naturally indoors on woven bamboo mats for 10 hours. Then the leaves are tossed and bruised to ensure even oxidation. The oxidation process lasts for more than 48 hours, allowing the leaves to develop complex flavor profiles. Lastly, the tea is roasted at low temperatures over lychee charcoal, to enhance it’s natural fruity notes.

This tea is delicious with ever-changing notes. It has notes of nectarines, buckwheat honey and molasses.

About Cultivate Tea View company

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4 Tasting Notes

445 tasting notes

TTB
This oolong tastes very mineral to me. I’m not getting much honey or floral notes from this one. It’s not bitter, but the minerality give it a bit of an astringent bite. Thanks for adding it to the box!

Flavors: Mineral

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75
157 tasting notes

TTB Review #56: If you’ve been following my TTB reviews, you’ll know that I’ve had a very volatile experience with “honey” teas. Fortunately, this one seems to have done it right. Definitely getting floral notes, but less orchid and more jasmine, maybe even a little rose. I appreciate this tea for restoring my faith in honey.

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94
1239 tasting notes

Holy smokes. If this tea tastes anywhere near as good as it smells it will be good. I apologize in advance if anything in this review doesn’t make sense. Nature hates me today. Something here in MN just gives me the watery eye, stuffy nose goodness of summer. This tea is fantastic! I just took a sip and it was like it transported me to a tropical hideaway. Lychee twirls around mineral notes. Oh, that was interesting. Buttered popcorn? Some varnish notes. The longer the leaves sit the more astringency comes out.

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150 tasting notes

Preparation: Gong Fu
Tasting Note:
Opps, I didn’t realize that this tea recommended using 95C water instead of 100C so I think I may have messed this batch up a little bit. Oh well, it doesn’t taste bad but I think since I have plenty of these leaves, I can try again. These gongfus were a little stronger and more “pithy” and a little tinsy astringent. I will retry again later to see if I can get a more accurate tasting note.

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