Wu Yi Shan "Bai Ji Guan" Rock Oolong Tea * Spring 2017

Tea type
Oolong Tea
Ingredients
Oolong Tea Leaves
Flavors
Almond, Apple, Apricot, Baked Bread, Butter, Carrot, Cedar, Chestnut, Coriander, Cream, Custard, Dandelion, Fruity, Grass, Hay, Honey, Lemon Zest, Mineral, Mushrooms, Orange Zest, Pear, Plums, Raisins, Rose, Spinach, Straw, Umami, Vanilla, Vegetal, Astringent, Cannabis, Coffee, Compost, Dry Grass, Drying, Sour, Tart, Vegetables, Citrusy, Green
Sold in
Bulk, Loose Leaf
Caffeine
Not available
Certification
Not available
Edit tea info Last updated by eastkyteaguy
Average preparation
200 °F / 93 °C 0 min, 30 sec 5 g 29 oz / 861 ml

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3 Tasting Notes View all

  • “Alrighty, I’m back with a new series of reviews. This one, like virtually every other review I have posted lately, comes from my backlog. To be a little more specific, this was one of my sipdowns...” Read full tasting note
    92
  • “I find this tea to be fairly underwhelming, and I can’t quite find that much to write home about, even though nothing is off per se. It has aromas of cannabis and custard, complemented by vegetable...” Read full tasting note
    71
  • “The dry leaves smells like green tea, with a few high notes in there. After a rinse, the leaves smelled like the tea was right in between green oolong and dark oolong. The taste was exactly as how...” Read full tasting note
    66

From Yunnan Sourcing

Bai Ji Guan (aka White Cockscomb) is a classic Wu Yi varietal originating from the “Bat Cave” deep in the Wu Yi mountains. First recorded in the Ming Dynasty it was given this name because the tops of bushes have a bright yellow-green appearance that in strong sunlight is almost white in color.

Bai Ji Guan is lightly processed through shade withering and when brewed gives up a sweet mushroom and longan fruitiness that is very delightful. Cha Qi is noticeable but subtle and never overpowering.

This tea has been grown without the use of pesticides or chemical fertilizers.

May 2017 Harvest

About Yunnan Sourcing View company

Company description not available.

3 Tasting Notes

92
936 tasting notes

Alrighty, I’m back with a new series of reviews. This one, like virtually every other review I have posted lately, comes from my backlog. To be a little more specific, this was one of my sipdowns from October, a month in which I didn’t really drink a ton of tea. This also seems to be a tea that only I liked. Yunnan Sourcing’s Bai Ji Guan seems to draw mixed reviews here on Steepster, but I seem to be the person who consistently likes it from year to year. I enjoyed this one greatly.

I prepared this tea gongfu style. After the rinse, I steeped 6 grams of loose tea leaves in 4 ounces of 194 F water for 6 seconds. This infusion was chased by 17 additional infusions. Steep times for these infusions were as follows: 8 seconds, 10 seconds, 13 seconds, 16 seconds, 20 seconds, 25 seconds, 30 seconds, 40 seconds, 50 seconds, 1 minute, 1 minute 15 seconds, 1 minute 30 seconds, 2 minutes, 3 minutes, 5 minutes, 7 minutes, and 10 minutes.

Prior to the rinse, the dry tea leaves presented aromas of mushroom, hay, grass, golden raisin, and cedar. After the rinse, I detected new aromas of roasted carrot, roasted almond, rose, custard, dandelion, and longan. The first infusion introduced aromas of spinach, turnip greens, and burdock. In the mouth, the tea liquor offered notes of hay, grass, dandelion, cream, rose, butter, longan, custard, golden raisin, roasted almond, and roasted carrot that were chased by hints of turnip greens, spinach, and burdock. The subsequent infusions coaxed out aromas of Asian pear, apricot, roasted chestnut, orange zest, baked bread, plum, and coriander. Stronger and somewhat more immediate notes of turnip greens, burdock, and spinach appeared as did belatedly emerging cedar and mushroom notes. New impressions of minerals, straw, roasted chestnut, apricot, Asian pear, vanilla, baked bread, dandelion greens, plum, orange zest, apple, honey, coriander, and lemon zest also appeared alongside brothy umami notes. As the tea faded, the liquor settled and emphasized mineral, hay, grass, roasted carrot, orange zest, umami, roasted almond, turnip green, and spinach notes that were balanced by hints of longan, lemon zest, mushroom, Asian pear, honey, cream, butter, coriander, and roasted chestnut.

This was a very interesting and complex tea, but it was also very approachable and drinkable. I found the texture of this offering’s liquor to be firmer and more defined than that of the spring 2016 offering. I know I have said it before, but I enjoyed this tea greatly. It should once again be noted, however, that my takes on Yunnan Sourcing’s Bai Ji Guan seem to be very different and consistently more positive than those of the majority of other reviewers, so any interested parties might want to take my high recommendation of this tea with a large grain of salt.

Flavors: Almond, Apple, Apricot, Baked Bread, Butter, Carrot, Cedar, Chestnut, Coriander, Cream, Custard, Dandelion, Fruity, Grass, Hay, Honey, Lemon Zest, Mineral, Mushrooms, Orange Zest, Pear, Plums, Raisins, Rose, Spinach, Straw, Umami, Vanilla, Vegetal

Preparation
6 g 4 OZ / 118 ML

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71
567 tasting notes

I find this tea to be fairly underwhelming, and I can’t quite find that much to write home about, even though nothing is off per se. It has aromas of cannabis and custard, complemented by vegetable compost and mushrooms later throughout the session. At the beginning, the taste is hay-like with a tart finish. The astringency is strong, but not overpowering. Later I notice further notes of dry grass, medium roast coffee, and mushrooms.

I’d say the body is fairly light and the liquor has a distinctively oily mouthfeel. There is also a kind of warming sensation spreading through my body after drinking the tea.

Flavors: Astringent, Cannabis, Coffee, Compost, Custard, Dry Grass, Drying, Hay, Mushrooms, Sour, Tart, Vegetables

Preparation
205 °F / 96 °C 0 min, 30 sec 6 g 3 OZ / 100 ML

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66
5 tasting notes

The dry leaves smells like green tea, with a few high notes in there. After a rinse, the leaves smelled like the tea was right in between green oolong and dark oolong. The taste was exactly as how you’d imagine it: a green oolong base with very bright citrus-y notes. The first few steeps had a sour aftertaste. It threw me off, as I did not read up on it when I tried. It took me a minute to get used to it, but nonetheless quite tasty.

Around steep number 5 the tea started to lose its flavors and returned a more faint tasting tea. I tried to push it a bit with more boiling water and longer steeps, but couldn’t get much out of it anymore.

Overall, a very enjoyable tea but one that doesn’t last very long. I’d say it’s good for some grandpa style drinking.

Flavors: Citrusy, Grass, Green, Mushrooms, Raisins

Preparation
195 °F / 90 °C 0 min, 30 sec 4 g 80 OZ / 2365 ML

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