Feng Qing Gold Tips Pure Bud Black Tea * Spring 2017

Tea type
Black Tea
Ingredients
Black Tea Leaves
Flavors
Almond, Apricot, Baked Bread, Black Pepper, Butter, Camphor, Caramel, Cedar, Celery, Cinnamon, Clove, Cocoa, Cream, Earth, Eucalyptus, Fennel, Green Beans, Herbaceous, Lemon Zest, Malt, Marshmallow, Mineral, Molasses, Nutmeg, Olives, Orange Zest, Peanut, Pine, Sugarcane, Sweet Potatoes, Tobacco
Sold in
Bulk, Loose Leaf
Caffeine
Not available
Certification
Not available
Edit tea info Last updated by eastkyteaguy
Average preparation
6 g 4 oz / 118 ml

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  • “I know I stated that I intended to post reviews of the rest of the teas I drank in October, November, and December before moving on to anything consumed in January in one of my most recent reviews,...” Read full tasting note
    95

From Yunnan Sourcing

This Yunnan varietal of Black tea is created from highest grade small bud Feng Qing Spring season tea. This tea is picked when the buds are still young, the tea is then rolled, briefly fermented and then wok-dried by hand. The flavor is among the smoothest of any Black tea I have ever tasted. The tea liquor is a super clear golden yellow and the aroma is penetrating and clean.

Production period: Spring
Area: Feng Qing County of Lincang (Yunnan)

About Yunnan Sourcing View company

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1 Tasting Note

95
868 tasting notes

I know I stated that I intended to post reviews of the rest of the teas I drank in October, November, and December before moving on to anything consumed in January in one of my most recent reviews, but I very quickly changed my mind about that. For one thing, I wanted to get some of my more recent sipdowns reviewed while they were still fresh in my mind, and for another, this tea was just so captivating that I could not resist the urge to go ahead and post a review of it. I finished a 50 gram pouch of this tea last night, and quite frankly, I was very sad to see it go as it was one of the very best Yunnan black teas I have ever tried.

I prepared this tea gongfu style. After a quick rinse, I steeped 6 grams of loose tea buds in 4 ounces of 194 F water for 5 seconds. This infusion was followed by 17 additional infusions. Steep times for these infusions were as follows: 7 seconds, 9 seconds, 12 seconds, 16 seconds, 20 seconds, 25 seconds, 30 seconds, 40 seconds, 50 seconds, 1 minute, 1 minute 15 seconds, 1 minute 30 seconds, 2 minutes, 3 minutes, 5 minutes, 7 minutes, and 10 minutes.

Prior to the rinse, the dry tea buds produced aromas of baked bread, malt, cream, sweet potato, pine, and eucalyptus. After the rinse, I detected new aromas of roasted peanut, black pepper, cinnamon, and nutmeg. The first infusion then introduced subtle aromas of roasted almond and cocoa alongside a stronger scent of juniper. In the mouth, the tea liquor presented notes of malt, pine, cream, baked bread, and sweet potato that were chased by impressions of black pepper, eucalyptus, cinnamon, and juniper before hints of cocoa, roasted peanut, marshmallow, caramel, and roasted almond made themselves known. Subsequent infusions introduced aromas of marshmallow, camphor, cedar, clove, fennel, caramel, lemon zest, and orange zest as well as subtler, more fleeting scents of earth, tobacco, and molasses. New notes of minerals, butter, molasses, clove, cedar, fennel, camphor, earth, orange zest, and lemon zest came out in the mouth alongside stronger notes of cocoa, caramel, and marshmallow. Impressions of nutmeg also belatedly appeared in the mouth, and I caught some hints of sugarcane, apricot, tobacco, green beans, celery, and green olive too. As the tea faded, the liquor offered notes of minerals, roasted peanut, cream, malt, lemon zest, and orange zest that were underscored by lingering hints of cocoa, sweet potato, roasted almond, baked bread, cinnamon, black pepper, juniper, tobacco, eucalyptus, camphor, and marshmallow. Somewhat stronger impressions of green beans, celery, and green olive lingered in the mouth after each swallow.

This was a ridiculously complex and challenging Dian Hong, but it was also tremendously enjoyable at the same time. Once again, the Feng Qing Dian Hong Group managed to impress me with their work. Definitely give this tea a shot if you have any interest in Yunnan black teas and are familiar with Feng Qing teas.

Flavors: Almond, Apricot, Baked Bread, Black Pepper, Butter, Camphor, Caramel, Cedar, Celery, Cinnamon, Clove, Cocoa, Cream, Earth, Eucalyptus, Fennel, Green Beans, Herbaceous, Lemon Zest, Malt, Marshmallow, Mineral, Molasses, Nutmeg, Olives, Orange Zest, Peanut, Pine, Sugarcane, Sweet Potatoes, Tobacco

Preparation
6 g 4 OZ / 118 ML
Kawaii433

18 infusions… Wow.
Great review.

eastkyteaguy

I tried to space out of each of my infusions so that the tea did not exhaust itself as quickly. I’m pretty sure this tea was the same as What-Cha’s China Yunnan Golden Buds Black Tea from spring 2017, but oddly, I kept this going much longer and got much more out of it. I don’t know if the additional time in storage had anything to do with that or if it was just the fact that I have been drinking more Feng Qing tea lately. I know my palate has changed considerably in the space of the last 6-7 months, so I’m sure that had an effect.

Kawaii433

Thank you for the extra detail. :D It helps me learn.

eastkyteaguy

No problem.

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