2012 "Bamboo Aroma" Tian Jian

Tea type
Black Pu-erh Blend
Ingredients
Not available
Flavors
Burnt Sugar, Green Wood, Herbs, Malt, Roasted
Sold in
Not available
Caffeine
Not available
Certification
Not available
Edit tea info Last updated by tperez
Average preparation
205 °F / 96 °C 0 min, 15 sec 8 g 4 oz / 120 ml

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3 Tasting Notes View all

  • “Here’s Hoping Teabox – Round Seven- Tea #5 It was a mystery to me what sort of this tea was, but it turns out it’s a ‘dark’ tea with very dark leaves but results in quite a light brew. The leaves...” Read full tasting note
    75
  • “A fantastic tea. Great complexity – a balance of savory, sweet, spicy, and smoky. It is also very dynamic – every infusion brought out a whole new balance of flavors: sometimes sweeter, sometimes...” Read full tasting note
    87
  • “I bought this tea a year or so ago, and when I tried it I though it was terrible; like a dirty, funky wet dog in the mouth. So it sat in the back of my tea cupboard and rested. Today I opened it...” Read full tasting note
    88

From Yunnan Sourcing

Tian Jian tea from Anhua County of Hunan packed in aromatic bamboo leaves and baked (low temperature) dry in the leaves. This process imparts a unique taste and aroma providing the Tian Jian aficionado with yet another reason to enjoy this wonderful tea.

The taste is thick and sweet, with smoke, carmelized sugar and roast oolong. An inexpensive tea well worth the price.

200 grams of tea per pack

2012 Harvest and Production

About Yunnan Sourcing View company

Company description not available.

3 Tasting Notes

75
2873 tasting notes

Here’s Hoping Teabox – Round Seven- Tea #5
It was a mystery to me what sort of this tea was, but it turns out it’s a ‘dark’ tea with very dark leaves but results in quite a light brew. The leaves are compacted like a pu-erh. The first steep is much like a charcoal roasted oolong (and the color of the steep is the same as well) but the other steeps get sweeter. I wish I had more notes for this one, as it is certainly unique. But much like the charcoal oolongs this is similar to, it’s just not my thing.
Steep #1 // 12 minutes after boiling // 3 minute steep
Steep #2 //few minutes after boiling // 3minute steep
Steep #3 // just boiled // 4 minute steep

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87
167 tasting notes

A fantastic tea. Great complexity – a balance of savory, sweet, spicy, and smoky.

It is also very dynamic – every infusion brought out a whole new balance of flavors: sometimes sweeter, sometimes smokier, sometimes spicier, etc. Highly recommend gong fu style with plenty of leaf so you can treat yourself to very engaging tea session!

There is an element to it that does require some getting used to. Some of the notes that come through are simply not that familiar. The carob and light malty-sweet smoke notes (for lack of a more accurate description…) are a bit strange at first, and are not something you find in other teas. So, give yourself some time to acclimate, and you will find yourself wanting to explore this tea more and more.

Last question – is there a bamboo aroma? I don’t know. Haven’t sniffed bamboo in a long time. I’ll sniff some the next time I go to the zoo and will report back.
*
Dry leaf: dark caramel, wildflower honey, grape stem, hints of sweet smoke; complex note like apple tart (cooked green apples, caramel, spices) comes through

Smell: dark caramel, carob, sweet smoke. Apple tart note still there. Leaf/stem note you get with roasted oolongs or black tea blends.

Taste: strongly brewed English breakfast tea, dark caramel, apple tart (green apple, caramel, spice), dry spice – allspice, hint of black pepper. Carob, dark chocolate, and dried tart fruit (cherries) in aftertaste.

tanluwils

I LOVE tian jian. I remember some of Scott’s other tian jians having qualities akin to black tea. This kind in particular hardly ever reaches the West, so much like maple-flavored things are nostalgic in the US, tian jian is marketed mainly to southern Chinese, many of whom will recall the “fragrance” of bamboo from their childhood.

apefuzz

The bamboo note is very interesting and adds some complexity to the brew. Too bad it doesn’t conjure up any fond memories for me. My childhood was filled more with tomato plants and poison ivy!

tanluwils

I’m also from the Northeastern US, but grew up with Chinese herbal concoctions so I find the medicinal notes of certain teas to be somewhat comforting, although not as much as Vermont maple syrup, and of course poison ivy. ;-)

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88
317 tasting notes

I bought this tea a year or so ago, and when I tried it I though it was terrible; like a dirty, funky wet dog in the mouth. So it sat in the back of my tea cupboard and rested. Today I opened it up, and it’s like a completely different tea!

The dry aroma is very sweet, and if I didn’t know better I’d guess it was a black tea. Brews a light orange. Like the smell the taste is sweet, a bit like burnt sugar. There’s notes of malt, green wood, and dried herbs. Specifically like dried herbs that have been aging in your mum’s spice cabinet for far too long. It’s sort of like a combination black tea, sheng pu, and roasted oolong. Doesn’t last many steeps however.

This is a nice tea now, and makes me want to further my Tian Jian exploration

Flavors: Burnt Sugar, Green Wood, Herbs, Malt, Roasted

Preparation
205 °F / 96 °C 0 min, 15 sec 8 g 4 OZ / 120 ML
Inkay

I love accounts of how different a tea is after some time has passed. I bought this one last year and haven’t had it yet; definitely need to give it a try sometime soon!

tperez

It’s a tasty tea now! I think aging is one of the most interesting things about puerh and hei cha.

apefuzz

Lol – wet dog in your mouth. I don’t know if I was that put off by it when I first had it a year or so ago, but it definitely is a delicious tea now!

Cwyn

I love this brand of dark Anhua heicha. I own three, each from a different vendor. I really get the black tea and betel nut flavor this is known for.

tanluwils

I’ve had that happen (looking and tasting like hongcha) with my tian jians too. They do morph in interesting ways.

tanluwils

The 2015 YS WuLong Tian Jian will give at least 7 tasty steeps.

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