Lycii (Goji) Berries

Tea type
Herbal Tea
Ingredients
Not available
Flavors
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Bulk
Caffeine
Caffeine Free
Certification
Not available
Edit tea info Last updated by Tamarindel
Average preparation
Boiling 5 min, 0 sec 8 oz / 236 ml

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  • “I decided to try steeping up some goji berries, because I really love David’s Goji Pop, but I find it pretty pricey considering how much tea you need to brew a cup. The results are nothing like...” Read full tasting note
    80

From Mountain Rose Herbs

COMMON NAME
Standardized: lycium
Other: Chinese boxthorn, Chinese wolfberry

BOTANICAL NAME
Lycium chinense Mill.
Plant Family: Solanaceae

OVERVIEW
PLEASE NOTE! “Goji berry” and Lycii berry are virtually the same, with the only discernable difference is that Goji is usually a high altitude strain of Lycium and is commonly found in the Himalayas, Nepal, Tibet, etc., whereas Lycii berry is the more common variety found in lowland areas. For trade purposes they are usually considered the same.

INTRODUCTION
Lycii berry, otherwise known to Chinese herbalists as Goji or Chinese Wolfberry is a bright red, almost chewy berry with a taste very similar to Raisins. It has been used as a general nutrient tonic (Yin tonic) for many years and Chinese medicine refers to it as a “cooling tonic”.

CONSTITUENTS
Beta-sitosterol, Betaine, Beta-carotene, Niacin, Pyridoxine, and Ascorbic acid

PARTS USED
Whole berries.

TYPICAL PREPARATIONS
Whole berries can be eaten raw, as they have a pleasant taste. Or they can be included in food or prepared as a tea.

SUMMARY
Not much research has been carried out for this particular botanical and to date there have not been any released notes on possible medicinal contraindications, side effects or potential health hazards (except for those pregnant or nursing). One particular warning that has been issued comes from many traditional Chinese herbalists who suggest that Lycii should never be taken for acute colds or flu, because it will have the tendency to bring a sickness deeper.

About Mountain Rose Herbs View company

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2 Tasting Notes

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658 tasting notes

I decided to try steeping up some goji berries, because I really love David’s Goji Pop, but I find it pretty pricey considering how much tea you need to brew a cup.

The results are nothing like Goji Pop.

Where Goji Pop is sweet-tart and fruity, this is buttery, nutty, and sweet in a baked-goods kind of way.

And despite the berries being intensely red, the brew doesn’t come anywhere close to Goji Pop’s hot pink. It is a pale brown.

So I guess Goji Pop’s flavor and color mainly come for the other ingredients: apple, hibiscus blossoms, rosehips, honeydew melon.

While the goji berries taste nothing like what I was expecting, this is still really good, and it actually reminds me of one of David’s other herbals: Forever Nuts. I love butter and nuts, so I won’t have any trouble getting this down.

Preparation
Boiling 5 min, 0 sec 3 tsp 8 OZ / 236 ML
Fjellrev

Yeah, I feel like Goji Pop hardly tastes like goji berry but it’s so damn delicious anyway.

Tamarindel

Yeah, in hindsight it seems the apple and honeydew give it most of its flavor, but before I tried these goji berries, I couldn’t figure that out, probably because I hardly ever eat honeydew.

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