Premium Jin Xuan Milk Oolong Tai Hua Gao Shan Oolong Tea (Flavored)

Tea type
Oolong Tea
Ingredients
Not available
Flavors
Asparagus, Butter, Butterscotch, Citrus Zest, Cream, Custard, Floral, Grass, Mango, Milk, Mineral, Mint, Oily, Orchid, Pineapple, Smooth, Spinach, Strawberry, Sugar, Sweet, Tropical Fruit, Vegetal
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Loose Leaf
Caffeine
Not available
Certification
Not available
Edit tea info Last updated by CrowKettle
Average preparation
195 °F / 90 °C 0 min, 45 sec 16 oz / 473 ml

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  • “2021 Spring Harvest Backlog from early January, when I was stuffed up The milk flavouring in this is intense! Like a literal fresh glass of cow’s milk, as opposed to the tangy buttercream or...” Read full tasting note
    86

From Yunnan Sourcing

Spring harvest Jin Xuan tea grown on Tai Hua Mountain in Anxi county of Fujian. Taiwanese Jin Xuan varietal tea growing at an altitude of 1100 meters is expertly hand-picked and processed in the traditional method.

The tea is lightly roasted to bring out it’s milk fragrance (nai xiang) and then steamed in milk to enhance the milk flavor further!**

Very aromatic tea with a subtle but lasting taste.

Fujian grown Taiwan varietal!

Spring Harvested

About Yunnan Sourcing View company

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1 Tasting Note

86
1230 tasting notes

2021 Spring Harvest Backlog from early January, when I was stuffed up

The milk flavouring in this is intense! Like a literal fresh glass of cow’s milk, as opposed to the tangy buttercream or mineral “milk-like” notes I sometimes get from a lot of Jin Xuan teas (both flavoured and unflavoured). Are my other favourite milk oolong teas this disconcertingly milky? I don’t think so. The cup is sweet to finish in a way that’s quintessential lactose sugar. It’s delicious but also so much milk. One of the downsides is that the milk sometimes lingers (if you’ve smelled the dairy section in the back of a grocery store you understand the physical presence of this faint sour sweet aftertaste; the same thing that makes this tea distinct also makes it finicky to my taste buds).

I still don’t have full smelling faculties, but my mom insisted on a cup after walking by mine – so the broth must be quite aromatic. Sticking my nose in, I do smell sweet, steamed milk, which is a delicious, rich aroma. While the leaves steep, it takes on a creme de leche-like hue and it’s luxurious.

After some time (around 4th steep), floral and fruit notes (strawberry, mango, pineapple) begin to emerge. I actually really love when my “jin xuan” and “high mountain” oolong carries these fruity sweet notes; that they’re initially buried under the milk scent is somewhat of a drawback for me here. The 4th steep is where a more buttery aspect emerges too. Hurrah for an excellent fourth (and fifth) steep.

PS – I appreciate Yunnan Sourcing clarifying that this particular tea is (edit- allegedly) steamed in milk, making it unfriendly to vegans and those sensitive or allergic to lactose. Many vendors I’ve seen carrying this tea style aren’t particularly transparent about flavouring or lack thereof (one must err on the side of caution if this is a factor). Luckily, there are vegan Jin Xuan styles, including unflavoured ones, too!

Steep Count: 5 @ 20-45 seconds.

Flavors: Asparagus, Butter, Butterscotch, Citrus Zest, Cream, Custard, Floral, Grass, Mango, Milk, Mineral, Mint, Oily, Orchid, Pineapple, Smooth, Spinach, Strawberry, Sugar, Sweet, Tropical Fruit, Vegetal

Preparation
195 °F / 90 °C 0 min, 45 sec 1 tsp 16 OZ / 473 ML
Mastress Alita

I heard the whole “steamed in milk” thing is a (very abundant, still) rumor, and that is never a “thing” in Milk Oolong production. I can buy there being dairy products being used in natural or artificial flavorings, but I chuckle any time I see a tea site claiming a Milk Oolong was “steamed in milk.”

CrowKettle

I’ve also heard that too, and I agree that it’s unlikely that this is literally the case!* Whether or not the flavouring is steamed, sprayed, etc., I’m going to assume this and other flavoured milk oolong teas contains trace dairy in some form (among other unknown ingredients), unless definitely stated (and even then a grain of salt – even for Mandala).

*I’ve seen all kinds of claims by vendors, customers, and purists: that the distinctive “natural” milky flavour of milk oolong is brought out while processing the leaves, or a “magical wind” did it (yikes). Getting some to admit that the clearly flavoured tea is flavoured is like pulling teeth, let alone getting a transparent natural/artificial flavouring list. :|

CrowKettle

Rambling here, but.. I assume diacetyl is what’s truly at play with milk oolong (like this one now that I’m properly smelling it), and some other teas with oily buttery/butterscotch notes. This can occur naturally as a result of fermentation (both plant-based and dairy based), but is also used in artificial butter flavouring. Depending on how diacetyl is achieved could determine if the milk oolong is considered “flavoured” or “natural”, or vegan or not vegan (so, some transparency would be nice).

Is Milk Oolong the Chardonnay of tea? Is it like a good stout? Or is it movie theater popcorn and margarine? I don’t know (it probably depends on each milk oolong), but I like all those things indiscriminately! lol

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