2019 Yunnan Sourcing "Ba Wang" Ripe Pu-erh Tea Cake

Tea type
Pu-erh Tea
Ingredients
Not available
Flavors
Baked Bread, Bamboo, Berries, Black Currant, Brown Sugar, Butter, Cocoa, Cranberry, Dark Chocolate, Hazelnut, Herbs, Honey, Meat, Medicinal, Mint, Paper, Plant Stems, Plants, Rice, Sawdust, Sour, Sweet, Thick, Wood, Yeast
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Caffeine
Not available
Certification
Not available
Edit tea info Last updated by Togo
Average preparation
205 °F / 96 °C 0 min, 15 sec 7 g 5 oz / 150 ml

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  • “I had my first session with this tea after I picked up a cake in one of my recent orders. It turned out to be more complex and subtle than I expected. On the other hand, it really is very thick and...” Read full tasting note
    90

From Yunnan Sourcing

This is a premium blend that we’ve name “Ba Wang” 霸王, which means something like “Badass King”. “Ba Wang” is a sort of neo-classical pu-erh tea cake title. After all, imitation can be the highest form of flattery! Although there are many cakes called “Ba Wang”, I think you’ll agree ours is among the best!

Composed of tea from three Menghai villages, this cake is bitter, sweet, and chocolatey with warm cha qi, thick body, and a long-lasting mouthfeel. We think you’ll enjoy this tea and consider worthy of adding to your collection for aging.

250 Grams per Cake (7 cakes per bamboo leaf tong)
Wrapper Designed by Vladimir Seredin
Pressed on May 15th 2019

About Yunnan Sourcing View company

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1 Tasting Note

90
396 tasting notes

I had my first session with this tea after I picked up a cake in one of my recent orders. It turned out to be more complex and subtle than I expected. On the other hand, it really is very thick and has a strong warming cha qi, as mentioned in the description. I definitely do not regret getting a whole cake blind.

Already the dry leaf smell is quite interesting and unique with notes such as sawdust, paper, meat, mint, juniper berries, and brown sugar. Strangely enough, wet leaves aroma reminds me of nuo mi xiang – the sticky rice fragrance herb sometimes added to shou – even though there is none here. On top of that I get scents of black currant, chicha morada, bamboo, and a light yeasty aroma.

The taste starts off woody and sweet with flavours of bread, nettle and plant stems. There is also a purple corn flavour which I noticed in the aroma already and which persists throughout the whole session. Soon enough, light bitterness appears, but I wouldn’t call this a bitter shou at all. Around steep 4, I also get a light chocolate note, but again, it is not as distinctive as you can find in other ripe pu’er teas. Rather, there is a very nice sour note developing towards the end of the session, which is quite unique. It is complemented by a medicinal character of the late steeps, which together make the session interesting all the way till the end.

In the aftertaste, some new flavours like honey, cranberry, cocoa, butter, and marjoram emerge. It gets slightly acidic late on as well. The texture is very thick, oily, and smooth from start to finish. It is very easy to drink despite being full bodied! At times, there is some interesting numbing mouthfeel, which makes the liquor seem to “disappear” in my mouth. The cha qi is mostly warming at first but slowly becomes very heady and stronger than you can find in most shou. I would describe the tea’s energy as of the creeping kind.

Flavors: Baked Bread, Bamboo, Berries, Black Currant, Brown Sugar, Butter, Cocoa, Cranberry, Dark Chocolate, Hazelnut, Herbs, Honey, Meat, Medicinal, Mint, Paper, Plant Stems, Plants, Rice, Sawdust, Sour, Sweet, Thick, Wood, Yeast

Preparation
205 °F / 96 °C 0 min, 15 sec 7 g 5 OZ / 150 ML

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