Phoenix Village "Mi Xiang" Shui Xian Oolong tea * Spring 2017

Tea type
Oolong Tea
Ingredients
Oolong Tea Leaves
Flavors
Brown Sugar, Hay, Mineral, Sweet, Tobacco, Cherry, Earth, Fruity, Honey
Sold in
Bulk, Loose Leaf
Caffeine
Not available
Certification
Not available
Edit tea info Last updated by eastkyteaguy
Average preparation
200 °F / 93 °C 2 min, 15 sec 4 g 7 oz / 214 ml

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4 Tasting Notes View all

  • “This is a very nice Wu Yi for those on a budget. Solid notes of caramel, cinnamon, baking spice, and peanut shell on the arrival. A “wet rock” minerality develops on the palate. The finish brings...” Read full tasting note
    89
  • “Yes, there is some occasional magic in this tea. It is a good buy on a budget. It didn’t seem too consistent, but when I had the brew dialed in just right I could find the sweet cherry notes...” Read full tasting note
    87
  • “While I don’t get much “honey” flavor from it, it’s definitely thick and sweet like a honey nectar – mixed in with strong mineral overtones along with some hay and brown sugar notes thrown in. The...” Read full tasting note
    82
  • “When I first got this tea, I had to say I wasn’t a fan of it. It was punchy and in your face in a way that my greener oolongs really weren’t. I decided to bring this tea back out and WOW it has...” Read full tasting note
    85

From Yunnan Sourcing

A lovely spring Shui Xian from Phoenix Village in Wu Yi mountainous area. Shui Xian varietal is an older varietal that has become less popular since it’s got a stronger taste than Da Hong Pao, Rou Gui and Tie Luo Han. Our Shui Xian is grown by village elders who stubbornly keep their gardens entirely the Shui Xian varietal. The tea bushes are around 60 years old and grow naturally.

This Spring 2017 Shui Xian we offer is a medium oxidation version with a “Honey Aroma” taste (pinyin: Mi Xiang) and mouthfeel. There is a hint of brown sugar, lots of honey and hay in there with a thick mineral base that delivers many infusions of lovely thick tea soup!

About Yunnan Sourcing View company

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4 Tasting Notes

89
167 tasting notes

This is a very nice Wu Yi for those on a budget. Solid notes of caramel, cinnamon, baking spice, and peanut shell on the arrival. A “wet rock” minerality develops on the palate. The finish brings up juicy and tangy fruit flavors of red currant, gooseberry, and tart raspberry. There is also an interesting nutty creaminess in the aftertaste, coupled with a lingering aftertaste that fades into a slight mintiness.

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87
23 tasting notes

Yes, there is some occasional magic in this tea. It is a good buy on a budget. It didn’t seem too consistent, but when I had the brew dialed in just right I could find the sweet cherry notes amongst the mineral/earthy elements. I’m normally a black tea drinker, but this one has convinced me to add some darker oolongs to the mix. Overall a good experience with this tea!

I don’t know why, but I brewed through all 100g without even attempting a second or third steep. That was probably a mistake, because as Nicholas mentioned, the “roast” may become less prominent on later steeps. LOL, I didn’t even know a roast was involved with this one. I am planning to order the Spring 2018 batch soon, so I’ll do some more experimenting.

Preparation
Boiling 4 min, 15 sec 4 g 16 OZ / 473 ML
apefuzz

Just drank through mine today. Sounds like you are brewing western style, which would definitely yield interesting results. This certainly isn’t an outstanding Wu Yi, but it is an exceptional performer for the price. I’ve had plenty of more expensive Wu Yi oolongs that were flat and uninteresting. This one is a great buy.

If you want to explore some other Wu Yi, Golden Guan Yin Da Hong Pao is good for the price, and Tie Luo Han is an awesome tea, but it is sort of expensive. I wouldn’t drink either of those western style, though. Enjoy your Wu Yi exploration!

Keemunlover

Yes, I drink tea western style. I’ve tried brewing gong fu style a few times, but I’d rather just brew tea one time and have larger pot of tea. Thanks for the tea tips.

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82
7 tasting notes

While I don’t get much “honey” flavor from it, it’s definitely thick and sweet like a honey nectar – mixed in with strong mineral overtones along with some hay and brown sugar notes thrown in. The after taste lasts forever, and I couldn’t put my finger on what it reminded me of, but then it just hit me… it reminds me of the sweet tobacco I used to chew in highschool. I’ve had this tea for a few months, and I revisit it every few weeks – it seems to get better and better every time I do.

Flavors: Brown Sugar, Hay, Mineral, Sweet, Tobacco

Preparation
Boiling 5 tsp 3 OZ / 100 ML

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85
15 tasting notes

When I first got this tea, I had to say I wasn’t a fan of it. It was punchy and in your face in a way that my greener oolongs really weren’t. I decided to bring this tea back out and WOW it has really improved. I enjoy the deep hay and syrupyness in the first couple of steeps. Practically a savoryness. Later on the roast looses its prominence and more fruit and sweetness appeared. I am really enjoying it and would solidly recommend.

Flavors: Cherry, Earth, Fruity, Hay, Honey

Preparation
185 °F / 85 °C 0 min, 15 sec 3 g 2 OZ / 70 ML

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