Wu Dong "Ba Xian" Dan Cong Oolong Tea * Spring 2017

Tea type
Oolong Tea
Ingredients
Oolong Tea Leaves
Flavors
Astringent, Biting, Bitter, Celery, Citrus Zest, Dry Grass, Floral, Flowers, Green Bell Peppers, Medicinal, Orange Blossom, Plums, Spices, Wood, Almond, Apple, Baked Bread, Cherry, Citrus, Cream, Custard, Fruity, Grass, Honey, Jasmine, Lychee, Mineral, Orange Zest, Orchid, Peach, Pear, Spinach, Sugarcane, Vanilla, White Grapes
Sold in
Bulk, Loose Leaf
Caffeine
Not available
Certification
Not available
Edit tea info Last updated by eastkyteaguy
Average preparation
205 °F / 96 °C 0 min, 15 sec 7 g 4 oz / 109 ml

Currently unavailable

We don't know when or if this item will be available.

From Our Community

4 Images

0 Want it Want it

3 Own it Own it

2 Tasting Notes View all

  • “I recently got my first Jianshui teapot (which I am already in love with) and decided to have the first session in it with this tea. I think that having a dedicated (and beautiful) pot for Dan Cong...” Read full tasting note
    92
  • “This was another recent sipdown of mine. I finished what I had of this tea a little earlier in the month, but I am not certain exactly when that was. Like most of the Dancong oolongs Yunnan...” Read full tasting note
    91

From Yunnan Sourcing

“Ba Xian” also known as the Eight Immortals Dan Cong grows in a couple of villages (Phoenix, Ping Keng Tou, and Zhong Shan) in the Wu Dong mountains typically at an elevation of 500-700 meters. The original eight plants of this varietal date back to the Song dynasty. Of the original eight plants only one survived and it was from this “Mother” plant (now called F1) that “Ba Xian” survived and spread. For this reason it also called “Ba Xian Guo Hai” (The Eight Immortals Cross the Ocean) Today Ba Xian is grown in a few villages (in Wu Dong) but is not mass produced.

Ba Xian is a special varietal in that it has 53 distinct aromatic molecules in it. It is also grown completely naturally without the use of pesticides, using composted chicken manure as it’s sole fertilizer.

The taste is strong with an up-front bitterness that quickly fades in to a fruit and flower sweetness. It has a distinct White Magnolia (白玉兰香) aroma to it.

An incredibly unique tea, grown naturally and carefully processed to preserve it’s lovely character.

Spring 2017 harvest from Ping Keng Tou village

Only 13 kilograms in total produced!

About Yunnan Sourcing View company

Company description not available.

2 Tasting Notes

92
397 tasting notes

I recently got my first Jianshui teapot (which I am already in love with) and decided to have the first session in it with this tea. I think that having a dedicated (and beautiful) pot for Dan Cong oolongs will let me get more into them.

This Ba Xian is quite wonderful. The floral fragrance is magnificent, as is its extremely long aftertaste, and a silky soft and ‘misty’ mouthfeel.

Dry leaf aroma is quite medicinal, fruity, and sweet, while the wet leaf smell is more flowery I’d say. The taste has a plum sweetness, green bell pepper bitterness, and a vegetal note of dry grass, among many other flavours. It is a smooth drink with a nice honey finish. Aftertaste displays further notes like orange blossom, spices, wood, citrus zest, and celery stalk. Over time, it becomes increasingly floral and fragrant.

Flavors: Astringent, Biting, Bitter, Celery, Citrus Zest, Dry Grass, Floral, Flowers, Green Bell Peppers, Medicinal, Orange Blossom, Plums, Spices, Wood

Preparation
205 °F / 96 °C 0 min, 15 sec 7 g 3 OZ / 100 ML

Login or sign up to leave a comment.

91
868 tasting notes

This was another recent sipdown of mine. I finished what I had of this tea a little earlier in the month, but I am not certain exactly when that was. Like most of the Dancong oolongs Yunnan Sourcing carries, this one was very good, great even. Prior to trying this tea, I recalled enjoying their spring 2016 Wu Dong Ba Xian greatly, but at the time, I had no real experience with Ba Xian and didn’t really know what to look for in one or what I should be trying to get out of the drinking experience. With a little more experience under my belt, I got more out of this tea and found it to be much more complex. There was, however, some nagging astringency toward the end of my review session that distracted me a bit, and I also found the tea’s most appealing characteristics to fade rather quickly.

I prepared this tea gongfu style. After the rinse, I steeped 6 grams of loose tea leaves in 4 ounces of 203 F water for 6 seconds. This infusion was followed by 15 additional infusions. Steep times for these infusions were as follows: 9 seconds, 12 seconds, 16 seconds, 20 seconds, 25 seconds, 30 seconds, 40 seconds, 50 seconds, 1 minute, 1 minute 15 seconds, 1 minute 30 seconds, 2 minutes, 3 minutes, 5 minutes, and 7 minutes.

Prior to the rinse, the dry tea leaves emitted aromas of orchid, magnolia, pomegranate, cherry, cream, vanilla, and orange zest. After the rinse, I detected new aromas of almond, spinach, sugarcane, pomelo, apple, and honey. The first infusion brought out aromas of baked bread and custard. In the mouth, the tea liquor offered notes of cream, vanilla, baked bread, sugarcane, pomegranate, apple, cherry, orchid, and pomelo that were chased by impressions of magnolia and hints of orange zest, almond, and spinach. The subsequent infusions brought out aromas of pear, plum, wood, grass, jasmine, lychee, peach, orange blossom, and green bell pepper. Notes of pear, grass, plum, wood, lychee, minerals, white grape, peach, orange blossom, and green bell pepper came out in the mouth alongside stronger and more immediate notes of almond, orange zest, and spinach, pleasant honey notes, and hints of custard and jasmine. Once the tea started to fade, the liquor settled and began emphasizing notes of minerals, grass, apple, almond, green bell pepper, cream, wood, pear, orange zest, and white grape that were underscored by hints of spinach, vanilla, baked bread, cherry, honey, and pomegranate. As mentioned above, a noticeable astringency also came out around this time.

There was a lot to like about this tea, but the astringency that kept coming out once it started to settle and fade really bothered me for some reason. It just seemed so distracting. Still, it did not come close to sinking the drinking experience for me, and one should always expect some astringency and/or bitterness with Dancong oolongs anyway. Had this tea carried some of its absolutely gorgeous floral notes into the later infusions and had the astringency not gotten to me, I would have had no issue assigning this tea a score of 95 or higher, but unfortunately, neither of those things happened. Just to be clear, though, this was still a more or less excellent Dancong oolong.

Flavors: Almond, Apple, Baked Bread, Cherry, Citrus, Cream, Custard, Floral, Fruity, Grass, Green Bell Peppers, Honey, Jasmine, Lychee, Mineral, Orange Blossom, Orange Zest, Orchid, Peach, Pear, Plums, Spinach, Sugarcane, Vanilla, White Grapes, Wood

Preparation
6 g 4 OZ / 118 ML

Login or sign up to leave a comment.