2014 Yun Tai Mountain "Basket Tian Jian" Hei Cha Tea

Tea type
Tea
Ingredients
Not available
Flavors
Coffee, Compost, Green, Medicinal, Mineral, Peat Moss, Spices, Sweat, Toast
Sold in
Bulk, Loose Leaf
Caffeine
Not available
Certification
Not available
Edit tea info Last updated by eastkyteaguy
Average preparation
Boiling 0 min, 15 sec 8 g 3 oz / 100 ml

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  • “Leaves are darker than the “Wu Long Mtn.” tian jian, smells somewhat roasty and fermented. Initial steeps taste like a rubber tire rolling through a compost pit with a bit of burnt toast and peat...” Read full tasting note
    60

From Yunnan Sourcing

Yun Tai Mountain is located in An Hua County of Hunan Province and is home to some of Hunan’s most remote and wild tea gardens. This tea is from those “un-tended and wild” tea gardens at an altitude of 1200 to 1350 meters above sea level. The Yun Tai mountains have a karst base and are very steep. They provide excellent drainage, access to direct sunlight and mineral nutrients to the tea plants.

Yun Tai Wu Han is brand of this tea. A wild grown Tian Jian style tea, it’s been wilted in three different batches. Each batch has a different degree of wilting, and after the full processing has been done the teas are blended together to create a unique flavor and aroma profile. The tea leaves are then packed into hand-made woven baskets. Each basket contains 750 grams of tea and is perfect for long-term storage as well.

The tea is sweet, with hints caramelized fruit and some chocolate notes. Some would say there is a smokiness to the tea, but it’s more of a roasted taste than a smoky taste. Very pungent and viscous tea which soothes the tongue and throat. Can be infused 8-10 times or more if you brew gong fu style.

A high quality Tian Jian from wild tea bushes!

750 grams per basket

2014 spring harvest

About Yunnan Sourcing View company

Company description not available.

1 Tasting Note

60
317 tasting notes

Leaves are darker than the “Wu Long Mtn.” tian jian, smells somewhat roasty and fermented. Initial steeps taste like a rubber tire rolling through a compost pit with a bit of burnt toast and peat moss. Despite the yuck, I push on. On steep number four it starts to taste sweeter and more mineral with a sweet/savory note of Chinese five spice blend and crappy coffee. 6th steep is more palatable yet; mineral, peat, and green banana.

Tian jian confuses me…

Flavors: Coffee, Compost, Green, Medicinal, Mineral, Peat Moss, Spices, Sweat, Toast

Preparation
Boiling 0 min, 15 sec 8 g 3 OZ / 100 ML
BigDaddy

Hate when you get a dud.

tperez

Yeah… Unfortunately most of the hei cha I’ve tried seems to go this way

teepland

“Initial steeps taste like a rubber tire rolling through a compost pit with a bit of burnt toast and peat moss”—I laughed out loud at that! That is quite a description! :)

tperez

Hahaha thanks

tanluwils

This is one of the most unusual sounding teas I’ve read. Try airing it out for a few months. I’m pretty sure it’ll change for the better. Would be curious to hear the results!

tperez

Yeah I’m thinking I’ll take my tian jians out of the bags and put them in bowls with towels on top for a few months to see if that will make a difference.

tanluwils

Be careful about any odors (including the towel’s!). Invasive odors can can really ruin a tea. Might want to purchase a large plastic bin and keep the tea in its large bag, only leaving it open and keeping it in that with the lid closed. Of course, opening it on occasion. The smoky aroma will fade over time and you may discover something really nice.

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