Fujian Qi Lan Wuyi Rock Oolong Tea

Tea type
Oolong Tea
Ingredients
Oolong
Flavors
Char, Floral, Honey, Honeydew, Lychee, Mineral, Roasted, Vegetables, Melon, Nectar, Nutty, Orchid, Sweet
Sold in
Loose Leaf
Caffeine
Not available
Certification
Not available
Edit tea info Last updated by TeaNecromancer
Average preparation
195 °F / 90 °C 1 min, 45 sec 4 g 5 oz / 158 ml

Currently unavailable

We don't know when or if this item will be available.

From Our Community

1 Image

0 Want it Want it

1 Own it Own it

4 Tasting Notes View all

  • “So I bought a sample of this years ago, and then lost it in the back of a cupboard, and recently found it again. Thought it might be a bit old and stale, but nope! I opened the package and it had a...” Read full tasting note
    88
  • “This Qi Lan is a much gentler animal than the one I had from Tao Tea Leaf a few hours ago. I steeped around 5 g of leaf in a 120 ml teapot at 195F for 10, 12, 15, 18, 20, 25, 30, 40, 50, 60, 90,...” Read full tasting note
    84
  • “Right then, another Oolong for my taste test, this time a Qi Lan from Fujian. First off, a ever-so-slightly tiny amount of burnt honey smell from the steeped leaves & a very subtle taste of...” Read full tasting note
    81
  • “Oh man, I am pooped! My birthday has been great fun, in typical mom and me fashion, we went out on a thrifting day! Of course we cranked Thrift Shop (it is our theme, retroactively, for most of our...” Read full tasting note
    99

From What-Cha

A relatively newly developed Wuyi oolong possessing a flowery taste and sweet finish.

About What-Cha View company

Company description not available.

4 Tasting Notes

88
348 tasting notes

So I bought a sample of this years ago, and then lost it in the back of a cupboard, and recently found it again. Thought it might be a bit old and stale, but nope! I opened the package and it had a bit of nice roasty/floral aroma. Measured some out into a steeping basket, poured on the hot water, was standing there setting the timer when the aroma rose up out of the mug and smacked me in the face. I actually said (out loud, we’ll say it was to my dog) “damn, that is some good fricken tea!”. As I sit here sipping it, the aroma is a complex mixture of flowers and like, carmelized fruit, honey-drenched pastries, just yummy. The flavour is light and sweet and with only a hint of that mineral note I associate with rock oolongs. Lovely. :)

Preparation
200 °F / 93 °C 3 min, 0 sec 3 g 10 OZ / 295 ML

Login or sign up to leave a comment.

84
241 tasting notes

This Qi Lan is a much gentler animal than the one I had from Tao Tea Leaf a few hours ago. I steeped around 5 g of leaf in a 120 ml teapot at 195F for 10, 12, 15, 18, 20, 25, 30, 40, 50, 60, 90, 120, and 240 seconds.

The first steep is surprisingly light for a Wuyi oolong. Honey and florals show up first, followed by roast and light tobacco. The second steep has a few more of those char and tobacco notes, but is still very floral and sweet. I also get roasted veggies and maybe some fruit (Lichi? Honeydew? I can’t tell.).

As Amanda Wilson said in her tasting note about this tea, it has some qualities that make it similar to a Dan Cong. Its honey character softens the roast, especially as the session progresses. Although the tea starts to get drying by the sixth or seventh steep, the honey carries it through.

As someone who likes greener oolongs, I enjoyed this Qi Lan more than its roastier counterpart from Tao Tea Leaf. It’ll be fun to see whether storing my remaining 30 g for a couple more years will mellow it out even further.

Flavors: Char, Floral, Honey, Honeydew, Lychee, Mineral, Roasted, Vegetables

Preparation
195 °F / 90 °C 5 g 4 OZ / 120 ML

Login or sign up to leave a comment.

81
338 tasting notes

Right then, another Oolong for my taste test, this time a Qi Lan from Fujian.

First off, a ever-so-slightly tiny amount of burnt honey smell from the steeped leaves & a very subtle taste of petals & burnt honey, like some flower petals have been smoked by burnt honey. – Interesting Amandas review says something similar, where the smoke feels distant. Thats exactly what its like. slightly nutty, sweet, fragrant, with some melon, flowers & nectar thrown in.
Its medium thick in the mouth with a subtle honey & cream aftertaste, which lingers a short amount of time.

All in all a nice session, didnt smack me around the face like some, but nothing bad about it either. Perfect for the time you want that taste but dont want it to be so strong, during a jade/white/green session it would fit perfectly.

Flavors: Honey, Melon, Nectar, Nutty, Orchid, Sweet

Preparation
195 °F / 90 °C 0 min, 15 sec 4 g 2 OZ / 60 ML

Login or sign up to leave a comment.

99
921 tasting notes

Oh man, I am pooped! My birthday has been great fun, in typical mom and me fashion, we went out on a thrifting day! Of course we cranked Thrift Shop (it is our theme, retroactively, for most of our lives) and hit all the shops in the area. Surprisingly (or not because I am almost broke) we did not bring home too many things. I did meet an awesome lady at one of the thrift stores, a fellow tea fan, so I had a nice bonding experience, which is always fun! Oh yeah, and my mom and Sheena combined to get me a new teapot, but more on that this weekend!

What does one review on their special day, clearly one of their favorite types of tea (yes it is an oolong) but which of the multitudes do I reach for? Yancha, definitely Yancha. Specifically What-Cha’s Fujian Qi Lan Wuyi Rock Oolong, from what I can gather it is a fairly light rock oolong leaning towards the more floral side than the roasted side. That is fine by me, though I prefer the kick in your face char and tobacco notes, I do really appreciate the milder ones as well. Oh who am I kidding, have I ever met an oolong, even a really garbage one at a Chinese restaurant, that I haven’t enjoyed? So, on to the Qi Lan, the aroma of the dried leaves is certainly a Yancha, I notice the tobacco and char notes that are so familiar, but they are much milder and joined by dried cherry and flowers, specifically hyacinths. Many rock oolongs are sweet, this one takes it too a whole new level, much like combining a Dan Cong and a Yancha for ultimate yummy smells.

Guess what, no surprise this tea is going into my Yancha teapot because anytime I can use my Yixing I am happy. Now don’t get me wrong, Yancha is fantastic in a gaiwan, but there is something really special about Yixing teapots, a special kind of magic. The aroma of the wet leaves is a blend of chestnuts, flowers, black walnuts, roasted chestnuts, and a touch of pipe tobacco. The aroma is very complex and sweet, the floral notes are really quite light, not the headiness of orchids, more like walking in a spring garden. The liquid’s aroma is sweet and creamy with notes of cocoa, chestnuts, hazelnuts, spicebush, violets, and pansies. Odd to mention pansies, but as someone who has harvested and made pansy tea MANY times (I was an odd child) I know that smell all too well.

The first thing I will say about this steep is it feels good, fancy tea folk might call this Cha Qi, it tingles and makes me feel both relaxed and focused, it is a beautiful feeling, much like my body is blending with the tea. It coats the mouth and is very smooth, the tastes starts out with walnuts and a hint of char, like a very distant and now dead fire. This transitions to sweetness, like figs and dates, two of my favorite things to eat, so extra yummy points there. It ends with a blend of toasted nuts and spring flowers.

For the second steeping, the aroma is warm and spicy, a blend of dates, cocoa, and hazelnuts with a distinct lily finish. The taste is a touch milder, there are less notes of figs more notes of nuts, definitely picking up the hazelnuts and walnuts. In the middle there is a small date themed explosion that has the same coating sensation, but instead of the entire mouth it is more of the back of the throat. The finish is lilies, this taste lingers with a nectar like sweetness for quite a while, or at the very least long enough for me to do another steep and let it get to sipping temperature.

The aroma of the third steep shares the same spicy and floral notes as the second with an added char and tobacco finish, It is a little bit like someone tossed a flower on dying coals and instead of burning the flowers released its scent to be mixed with the smell of coals. The taste has mellowed out a good bit, mostly it is a sweet blend of hazelnuts and dates with a hint of tobacco. For the finish I am left with lingering lilies and honey. This Yancha is delicious and unique, is it my new favorite? Not sure, I am not sure anything will replace my love of Shui Xian which I consume in rather insane quantities, but this will certainly be an immensely enjoyable treat. Now I shall finish my birthday by catching up on my reading!

For blog and photos: http://ramblingbutterflythoughts.blogspot.com/2014/11/what-cha-fujian-qi-lan-wuyi-rock-oolong.html

Kaylee

Happy birthday!

TeaNecromancer

:D thank you!

Ubacat

Happy Birthday!

Anlina

Happy birthday!

dragondrool

Happy Birthday!

Login or sign up to leave a comment.