Lucky Accident

Tea type
Oolong Tea
Ingredients
Oolong Tea Leaves
Flavors
Fruity, Roasted, Sweet
Sold in
Loose Leaf
Caffeine
Not available
Certification
Not available
Edit tea info Last updated by eastkyteaguy
Average preparation
195 °F / 90 °C 1 min, 0 sec 5 g 5 oz / 150 ml

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  • “I bought a sampler set as I was curious and I just happened to like the name of it. Dry leaf aroma from bag: It’s a lovely sent of roasted oolong with hit of herbal medicine. I really love this...” Read full tasting note
    76

From Old Ways Tea

This tea is a mix between Huang Guan Yin (105) and Qi Lan. Unlike a blended da hong pao, which is carefully crafted, this one was on accident. My aunt accidentally mixed together a batch of qi lan and huang guan yin while working. Although upsetting at the moment, we have decided that it was a lucky: the result is quite nice!

The tea is sweet but balanced by some bitterness from the fresh roast. The soup is mouth watering and warms your throat. A gentle fruit fragrance is present.

About Old Ways Tea View company

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1 Tasting Note

76
35 tasting notes

I bought a sampler set as I was curious and I just happened to like the name of it.

Dry leaf aroma from bag: It’s a lovely sent of roasted oolong with hit of herbal medicine. I really love this smell. It reminds me of my grandfather’s tea cabinet.

Leaf in warmed gaiwan: There’s a hint of sweetness — fruits & florals — with that smokey charcoal scent.

Wet leaves: High notes of sugar & fruit (peach?). Deeper notes of roasted charcoal. As the steeps increase, the high notes become more prominent.

Brew times: 60s, 75s, 90… I was able to do about 4-5 steeps before I felt the tea gave out. YMMV with brew times & water temps.

Water temps: 196 – 200 deg F

(Since this was a roasted WuYi oolong, I felt comfortable brewing it at a higher temp and longer steep time than a Dan Cong oolong.)

Color: It starts of a deep rich red amber, but decreases in color/intensity with each subsequent steep until it was about a mid-orange amber.

Tea broth: This is an extremely easy tea to drink. It starts off slightly sweet which counteracts the mild bitterness that follow on the tail end; it’s fairly balanced. It’s got a medium-body at the first steep and drops of with subsequent steeps (which I attribute to my longer steep times and extracting most of the flavors)

The flavors of this tea aren’t complex, but they are well balanced and gives you enough to enjoy the tea without feeling like it’s missing something (which I find often happens). There’s a mild tongue drying after drinking the tea, but it’s pleasant as it also causes a mild watering on the tongue. There’s also a very mild cha qi in the mouth & throat that is refreshing.

Honestly, it reminds me of my grandfather’s tea, so there’s a bit of nostalgia at play here.
I would NOT brew this Grandpa style as I think it might get very bitter over time.

Overall, I think this would make an excellent travel tea to have in your valise. It’s got enough flavor to be enjoyable but not so complex that you need to sit there and think about what you just drank. The small pre-sized packets are handy for traveling (although not convenient if you want loose leaf tea.)

The pack comes in 8 grams. I brewed up 5 grams and will be using 3 grams in a cold brew.

Flavors: Fruity, Roasted, Sweet

Preparation
195 °F / 90 °C 1 min, 0 sec 5 g 5 OZ / 150 ML

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