Java OP Dewata Grey Dragon

Tea type
Oolong Tea
Ingredients
Not available
Flavors
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Caffeine
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Certification
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Edit tea info Last updated by KittyLovesTea
Average preparation
175 °F / 79 °C 4 min, 0 sec

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  • “A sample from KittyLovesTea, and another one I left for fear of messing it up. I’m still not entirely sure how to treat it, “it” being a white tea left to oxidise. I plumped for treating it like a...” Read full tasting note
    60

From Nothing But Tea

Grey Dragon Tea comes from the central Java highlands of Indonesia, from the tea state of Dewata, which translated into the local Indonesian language, means “ home of the Gods and Goddesses”, an apt name for this beautiful tea. Grey Dragon Tea is grown at attitudes of around 1000-1500m above sea level, grown in rolling hills of the tea estate, with breathtaking views and scenery.

This delicate tea is a bespoke blend for Twinings, and only 80-100 kgs is produced each year. The history of this tea is really interesting, as we discovered it purely by accident. In 2008, we were in Dewata to buy some White Tea, and the guys from the estate had been experimenting with a clone called Dewata 27, where the White Tea was picked and left to oxidise for more than 2 days, and the result was this fabulous Grey Dragon Tea.

- Taken from Twinings website BUT this is the same tea as sold by NBT. It’s just that Twinings offered more information about production and origin.

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1 Tasting Note

60
2207 tasting notes

A sample from KittyLovesTea, and another one I left for fear of messing it up. I’m still not entirely sure how to treat it, “it” being a white tea left to oxidise. I plumped for treating it like a while for my first go, and I think that was probably right. It tastes smooth, anyway, so it certainly didn’t do it any harm.

Hot, I’m not sure whether I like it all that much. As it cools, however, it’s a lot more pleasant. More of the flavour seems to come out, and it takes on more of the natural sweetness white tea can sometimes have. It tastes very honeyed, and slightly hay-like, but there’s a deeper edge to this that I suspect is caused by the oxidisation. It’s pretty unique, I think. The dry leaves are pretty unique, too, retaining some of their white downiness, but largely being very fine, needle-like, and almost black in colour. The liquor is a deep honey colour.

It’s not a strong flavour, and it’s hard to pinpoint exactly what I’m tasting. A stouter, sturdier version of a white tea, with a slightly fruity edge. When I say fruity in this case, I’m thinking of orange fruits like peach and apricot.

I think this is one that will grow on me, and I can actually imagine it tasting really wonderful iced. It’s certainly one I’ll continue drinking at a lower temperature. It’s an odd creature hot.

Preparation
175 °F / 79 °C 4 min, 0 sec 1 tsp

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