Yellow Tea

Tea type
Yellow Tea
Ingredients
Not available
Flavors
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Caffeine
Not available
Certification
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Edit tea info Last updated by Jillian
Average preparation
Boiling 5 min, 30 sec 6 oz / 177 ml

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8 Tasting Notes View all

  • “I finally did what the instructions said on the packet. I just didn’t believe that something that is so similar to a green tea could need the brewing instructions they gave it: boiling water (leave...” Read full tasting note
    73
  • “I allowed myself to be talked into some rather pricey yellow tea on my last shopping extravaganza — no branding, no name; it was one that the owner of TeaMaze had encountered at an expo over the...” Read full tasting note
  • “Today in class we tasted yellow tea. I’m not sure what the name of this one was either, but I think it might’ve come from a mountain. I thoroughly enjoyed the earthy taste of the tea. Apparently...” Read full tasting note
    95
  • “It smells really strong, smells savory almost, had a nice taste though. Brewed the second round for not as long so it was not as heavy as a taste.” Read full tasting note

From Leaf

This is a very delicate, light, velvety tea, slightly sweet.
This rare tea belongs to the yellow tea family, a cousin of green and white teas. Yellow tea is not a new fad, it goes back 4000 years in China! Yellow tea often used to be reserved for Chinese emperors’ very own consumption. In fact it is believed that the name ‘yellow’ may have come not just from the colour of the tea but also the colour worn by emperors…This tea is made of only young buds, flattened and stretched to give it its distinctive yellow shine. Yellow tea is believed to be very rich in antioxidants.

Preparation instructions are available on the pack.

For those who like the details: this yellow tea is a Wei Shan Mao Jian from the province of Hunan in China.

About Leaf View company

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8 Tasting Notes

73
200 tasting notes

I finally did what the instructions said on the packet. I just didn’t believe that something that is so similar to a green tea could need the brewing instructions they gave it: boiling water (leave water to stand for 30 secs before pouring) and twenty minutes to brew. After all, I’m used to sencha, that often needs under a minute with 70-75 degC water.

But I have always found this tea very mild and pale, so I was curious what would happen when I actually followed the instructions. The instructions said that the tea tastes okay after 5 minutes but best after 20, so I put it in a pot with a tea cosy to keep it warm, and had a cup after 5 minutes and left the rest brewing for a bit longer.

The five-minute cup was still very pale, and mild tasting. It tasted no stronger than an unripe pear or melon. The taste that was there was nice, but it was so pale that I could easily taste the water it was brewed with rather than just the tea. Unfortunately, water in this area tastes pretty horrible, so it wasn’t pleasant.

After 20 minutes, it is much better, as the packet suggested. The tea never went bitter, it just tastes slightly grassy but with a flavour that I can only describe as being interesting. By which I mean that it’s not exactly the same as any green tea I have had, there’s something individual about it. And I like that.

The tea company was right and I have paid the price for being so stubborn and independent not to follow their advice. Don’t get me wrong, I’ve had other good cups of this tea, but I was missing out a bit by not brewing it properly

Preparation
Boiling 8 min or more
Cofftea

I’ve read that it’s similar to oolong as well. That’s why I’m so confused about it.

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2121 tasting notes

I allowed myself to be talked into some rather pricey yellow tea on my last shopping extravaganza — no branding, no name; it was one that the owner of TeaMaze had encountered at an expo over the summer and she had not yet put on her shelves.

Y’all know that I am a sloppy steeper; I don’t own a gaiwan (don’t judge :) and sometimes even grandpa style is a little too much work for me. I just want to throw and go. And this whatever-it-is variety has cheerfully taken whatever abuse I have thrown at it so far.

With conventional green tea parameters, it is lightly buttery—like buttermilk biscuits with a hint of honey. Second steep, same leaves, longer steep time, the buttered greens flavor intensifies a bit, and the texture is like heavy satin. And when I couldn’t stand to waste the rest of the pot and poured it in a tumbler to refrigerate overnight, it turned a beautiful golden brunette color with that same silky biscuit-y texture.

So, experts … tell me what I need to know about yellow tea. Other prep recommendations?

Martin Bednář

I had only once yellow tea and prepared it in gaiwan. It picked up some fruity notes, as I recall.

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95
15 tasting notes

Today in class we tasted yellow tea. I’m not sure what the name of this one was either, but I think it might’ve come from a mountain. I thoroughly enjoyed the earthy taste of the tea. Apparently it’s rare now, which is disappointing because I would’ve liked to explore this tea some more.
11/09/2018

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16 tasting notes

It smells really strong, smells savory almost, had a nice taste though. Brewed the second round for not as long so it was not as heavy as a taste.

Preparation
2 min, 45 sec 3 tsp 6 OZ / 177 ML

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