2012 Nannuo Shan Shou

Tea type
Pu-erh Tea
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Caffeine
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Edit tea info Last updated by DigniTea
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  • “Finally getting around to reviewing a sample of this tea which was graciously included with my last order from Crimson Lotus! I’m not particularly experienced with shou but interested to see how...” Read full tasting note

From Crimson Lotus Tea

2012 Nannuo Shan Shou 357g
This cake is made of 100% material from Nannuo Shan. This was sourced, processed, and pressed by a small family operation, Lao Chen Jia. We bought a cake of this last year in the Kunming markets and liked it, but we found other shou puerh we liked more. We took this cake home to Seattle and put it in our storage setup and promptly forgot about it. A few weeks before we came back to China this year we found it in a box and tried it again. Wow! It had really matured into something delicious with great depth. We decided then and there we were picking up this cake no matter what. This will brew thick and dark and has a really nice depth with a great aroma. This has been dry stored in Kunming, so if you put it in a humid storage environment like ours it will only get better.

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1 Tasting Note

73 tasting notes

Finally getting around to reviewing a sample of this tea which was graciously included with my last order from Crimson Lotus! I’m not particularly experienced with shou but interested to see how this one tasted. Unfortunately this cake is now sold out, but I hope this sample will make for a good learning experience.

The wet leaf smells earthy (of course) with a hint of maybe a spice note in there. The first steep is a light brownish red. It has a clear note to it that I like to think of as petrichor, but overall this first steep is quite light and not too distinctive. The second steep is a much darker red, thicker and more viscous, but still quite clear in taste. I generally find shou a little tough to figure out—since the tea is often so mellow, nothing particularly jumps out at me while drinking.

The third steep becomes dark black-red and feels a little bit more viscous. The flavor itself hasn’t felt like it’s grown on me too much. As far as my untrained tongue can detect, this is shou, and unfortunately I can’t really pick too much else up. Maybe if anyone has tips for what to look out for :)

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