2021 Yunnan Sourcing "Hong Ni Tang" Old Arbor Raw Pu-erh Tea Cake

Tea type
Pu-erh Tea
Ingredients
Not available
Flavors
Campfire, Charcoal, Floral, Fruity, Grapes, Pine, Resin, Sweet, Tangy, Vinegar
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Bulk
Caffeine
Not available
Certification
Not available
Edit tea info Last updated by Togo
Average preparation
Boiling 0 min, 15 sec 8 g 4 oz / 120 ml

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  • “Most really young raws don’t tend to offer me a lot in terms of aromatics, but when they do, it seems to often be a sign I’m in for a treat. This Hong Ni Tang was one such occasion. After the...” Read full tasting note

From Yunnan Sourcing

Hong Ni Tang village (lit. Red Mud Pool) is located in the far west of Jinggu not far from Mengku county (Lincang). The tea trees from which this tea has been made range in age from 80-200 years and grow in a steep south-facing hill near the village.

The character of the tea is something in-between Jinggu and Mengku teas. It’s got the cooling character and subtle bitterness that comes and goes quickly (like a Mengku old arbor tea), but it also has a savory mushroom broth taste, with some fruity upfront. The Cha Qi is strong, but both Jinggu and Mengku teas have this character.

A unique tea with a unique provenance. Very enjoyable and suitable for long term aging (or enjoying now).

Stone-pressed in the traditional manner.

357 grams per cake (7 cakes per bamboo tong)

50 kilograms in total

Wrapper Illustration by Rebecca Smith

About Yunnan Sourcing View company

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1 Tasting Note

123 tasting notes

Most really young raws don’t tend to offer me a lot in terms of aromatics, but when they do, it seems to often be a sign I’m in for a treat. This Hong Ni Tang was one such occasion. After the rinse, the leaves have a complex, deep aroma. Foresty, campfire embers, perhaps even a touch of vinegar. This is reflected in the taste, and it’s great.

I love this tea. I state that twice in my notes. It has a lot of character. Scott’s description says the character of this tea is between Jinggu and nearby Mengku and I agree. It has the complex yet deep foresty character of certain Mengku teas together with the sweetness and added extra character of Jinggu. The aforementioned campfire embers are there in the most enjoyable form I’ve come across in tea. After the first couple steeps it also develops a pleasing tanginess. Somewhere in the middle I started picking up on some grape leaves. Towards the late infusions the tea gets more fruity and floral. There’s a touch of astringency but no bitterness to speak of.

The Hong Ni Tang is such a complex and unusual tea I immediately fell in love with it. And not only is it complex but has great depth as well. The mouthfeel is also good and cha qi noticeable but not too potent for my liking. While not one of Scott’s strongest teas, the strength is also very good and longevity excellent. This is a tea I would warmly recommend to any sheng lover, especially given its rather affordable price of $0.20/g. I’m definitely picking up a cake in my next Yunnan Sourcing order. While it’s too early to say, based on first impressions at least this might just be one of my personal favorite young raws.

Flavors: Campfire, Charcoal, Floral, Fruity, Grapes, Pine, Resin, Sweet, Tangy, Vinegar

Preparation
Boiling 0 min, 15 sec 8 g 4 OZ / 120 ML

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