2012 Gao Jian Shan "Qian Liang Cha" Hunan Hei Cha Tea

Tea type
Pu-erh Tea
Ingredients
Not available
Flavors
Anise, Baked Bread, Cinnamon, Earth, Hay, Honey, Marshmallow, Bark, Mineral, Spices, Sweet
Sold in
Not available
Caffeine
Not available
Certification
Not available
Edit tea info Last updated by Togo
Average preparation
Boiling 0 min, 15 sec 7 g 4 oz / 110 ml

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2 Tasting Notes View all

  • “2012 Gao Jian Shan “Qian Liang Cha” 5g/100ml 210F 15 sec rinse 10 minute rest dry leaves smell of honey and earht maybe slight mushroomy wet leaves are woody something like toasted marshmellow and...” Read full tasting note
    79
  • “This is the first (and to this day the only) Qian Liang tea that I’ve tried. I am definitely intrigued – it is a really unique tea, which I also haven’t found the right way to brew yet mostly due...” Read full tasting note
    80

From Yunnan Sourcing

Gao Jia Shan production made from 2012 Spring tea leaves. Pressed into a huge 36 kilogram column called “Qian Liang Cha” (aka 1000 catty tea) and then aged for 7 years before we purchased a whole column and then cut into slices and re-packaged into white wrapper 680-780 grams cake. (If you want to get whole “cake” choose the 800 grams option and you’ll get a whole cake + some pieces to get the overall weight up to 800 grams. (example: you might get a 710 gram “cake” and a few chunks totaling 90 grams).

We are also offering small cubes of this tea as for sampling. They are roughly 10 grams each but can vary by weight and size, and as such are sold by weight.

Qian Liang tea is compressed in a long column (typically 36kg) through a laborious process that involves steaming the leaves and funneling them into a three layered cylinder of woven bamboo. Then a team of 5 to 8 people will simultaneously compress the tea using leverage and then tighten each section with thick bamboo stripling. Once firmly compressed the Qian Liang “logs” are dried in the sun and then finally cured for months in an indoor warehouse. In this form they can be aged for decades or even centuries without molding, only improving in taste, aroma and complexity with each passing year!

The taste is spicy, sweet, thick, with hints of brewer’s yeast and mushrooms. Really kind of difficult to describe, so we would encourage you to purchase the lesser amount first to see if you like it.

Gao Jia Shan is both a place and the name of the tea factory brand that produced this lovely tea. Gao Jia Shan as a producer doesn’t have as long of a history as Yi Yang and Bai Sha Xi tea factories but nonetheless produces very high quality Fu Brick tea processed in the traditional manner.

Spring 2012 harvest tea leaves, stored as a 36.25 kilogram column in An Hua County of Hunan until March 2019 when it was cut up into “cakes” and moved to Kunming.

About Yunnan Sourcing View company

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2 Tasting Notes

79
11 tasting notes

2012 Gao Jian Shan “Qian Liang Cha”
5g/100ml
210F
15 sec rinse
10 minute rest
dry leaves smell of honey and earht maybe
slight mushroomy
wet leaves are woody something like
toasted marshmellow and honey
baked crust earthy, some kind of spice like cinnamon
or anise
tea soup is golden brown with slight hints of red and very slightly
cloudy

first steep 20 sec: a little earth and wet hay
maybe some fruitiness like bananas thick
and viscous no bitterness. seems slightly minty too

second steep 25 sec: mushroom upfront with earthiness
and wet hay on the follow up. yeasty, it seems like im
tasting a little spice in it to. maybe some cinnamon
on the aftertaste. could be five spice
has the taste of honey without the sweetness of honey

third steep 35 sec: darker than earlier steepings
the wet hay is up front. there are flashes of the taste
of honey throughout this infusion. the earthiness
is a bit stronge but very pleasant
the huigan from this is light and subtle but it
sticks to the front teeth. the Qi is calming and relaxing

fourth steep 45 sec:
the color is holding stady at this point
quite sweet, there is something like a brothy
texture to this. the banana that i smelled is
in the middle of this tea right behind the wet hay
earthiness is kinda just lingering maybe
a slight medicinal edge

fifth steep 1:00 the tea soup color is lightening up and seems to
be more clear the honey notes were up front this time
followed by the notes of wet hay
the musty earthy notes are at the base of the flavor
the huigan is stronger this time

sixth steep 1:15: im getting the toasted marshmellow
flavors but strongly for a brief period followed by honey
and the wet hay. earthiness is still in the background
maybe some nuttines

seventh steep 1:30: the color is lighter this time
so this will be my last steeping wet hay is at the forefront this time
followed by earthiness and the hugian is now more subtle
the fruitines is back again. there was something savory about this

would i recoomend this tea?: yes. although i dont know how it will age since its so densly packed

Flavors: Anise, Baked Bread, Cinnamon, Earth, Hay, Honey, Marshmallow

Preparation
Boiling 0 min, 15 sec 5 g 3 OZ / 100 ML

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80
684 tasting notes

This is the first (and to this day the only) Qian Liang tea that I’ve tried. I am definitely intrigued – it is a really unique tea, which I also haven’t found the right way to brew yet mostly due to it being pressed so tightly. It seems to require a rinse of several minutes followed by a lengthy rest at the very least.

It is a very comforting and warming tea that seems very much suited to late autumn days. The main flavours includes earhty, spicy (bay leaf, caraway, star anise) and sweet (tamarind) ones.

Flavors: Anise, Bark, Earth, Mineral, Spices, Sweet

Preparation
Boiling 8 g 4 OZ / 120 ML

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