Ta Ku Hou Village High Mountain Dan Cong

Tea type
Oolong Tea
Ingredients
Oolong Tea Leaves
Flavors
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Loose Leaf
Caffeine
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Certification
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Edit tea info Last updated by Mitten5
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1 Tasting Note View all

  • “Prep: 60cc gaiwan, full to brim or mostly full, boiling water, flash steep x3, 10s, 10s, then chase flavor Sessions with this tea: 7? Taste: This is a citrus/limey dancong at heart. This silly...” Read full tasting note

From Yunnan Sourcing

Ta Ku Hou village is a small village near Phoenix town just to the west at an altitude of 1350 meters. This is one of highest altitude villages in the Wu Dong mountainous area. Our Ta Ku Hou Dan Cong is grown by one family and is from a small crop harvested from their own small tea garden. The trees are between 60 and 120 years old and grow wild without intervention.

The tea itself is medium leaf, dry leaf is dark in color and when brewed is typically green with some brown. The tea has been hand-picked and processed at each stage, and took more than a month of labor to complete. The taste is very vibrant and complex with notes of fruit and eucalyptus. There is a slight bitter which accentuates the fruity sweetness this tea delivers. It’s got a strong mouth-feel, cha qi and is very infusable.

A premium small-batch Dan Cong that imparts the depth and wisdom of this incredible tradition to those fortunate enough to try it.

3.2 kilograms in total!

Late-March 2016 harvest and processing

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1 Tasting Note

46 tasting notes

Prep: 60cc gaiwan, full to brim or mostly full, boiling water, flash steep x3, 10s, 10s, then chase flavor
Sessions with this tea: 7?

Taste: This is a citrus/limey dancong at heart. This silly description on YS website says eucalyptus, and when I read that initially I was like “oh ha ha it’s probably just some mentholy note that he is trying to describe.” But now it’s like “yup that tastes like eucalyptus smells.” But that note isn’t very big in the mix, is much more citrusy

Body: medium thickness, more astringency than expected from a dancong but not unpleasant. I tried to tune down my brewing parameters because I thought this note was an accident, but I can’t get rid of it, I think it’s part of the tea. Again, not unpleasant, just ate almonds feel.

Fragrance: big aroma, kinda vaguely floral/citrusy

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