Parasol Dancong

Tea type
Oolong Tea
Ingredients
Oolong Tea
Flavors
Grapefruit, Honey, Jasmine, Milk, Orange Blossom, Floral, Perfume, Violet
Sold in
Loose Leaf
Caffeine
Not available
Certification
Not available
Edit tea info Last updated by AJ
Average preparation
Not available

Currently unavailable

We don't know when or if this item will be available.

From Our Community

1 Image

1 Want it Want it

2 Own it Own it

2 Tasting Notes View all

  • “The dry leaves smell surprisingly sweet, with notes of jasmine and grapefruit. Subtle and complex flavor, like wildflower honey; there’s even a milky undertone in there bringing it all together....” Read full tasting note
  • “After the wild journey of trying to get this tea across the water during the pandemic, it’s finally here. Am I waiting two weeks to let it rest? …The puerh, sure, but I couldn’t keep my hands off...” Read full tasting note

From white2tea

From the Guangdong province of China, our Parasol Dancong oolong tea is made from niangzaisan varietal.

The name Niangzaisan roughly translates as “young girl with an umbrella”. It’s a varietal named for the parasol shape of the trees. Rarely sold in the west, this is a varietal that is not very well-known or widely produced. It’s an elegant tea, bursting with flavors of overripe fruit. If you’ve made the rounds with all of the usual Dancong suspects, you can’t skip this.

About white2tea View company

Company description not available.

2 Tasting Notes

38 tasting notes

The dry leaves smell surprisingly sweet, with notes of jasmine and grapefruit.
Subtle and complex flavor, like wildflower honey; there’s even a milky undertone in there bringing it all together. It’s a quieter experience than I usually go for – delicious, but the tea really demands all my attention or I’ll miss something.

Flavors: Grapefruit, Honey, Jasmine, Milk, Orange Blossom

gmathis

That sounds like a welcome little dose of spring!

Login or sign up to leave a comment.

459 tasting notes

After the wild journey of trying to get this tea across the water during the pandemic, it’s finally here. Am I waiting two weeks to let it rest? …The puerh, sure, but I couldn’t keep my hands off of the oolong.

Holy balls is this aromatic and perfumy. I flash-steeped this, 90ml gaiwan about 3/4s full, just-boiled water, second or two, dump. Drank the wash. You can taste what feels like the usual astringency with some harsher, longer-steeped dan congs, but is transformed into a pervasive perfume. Smooth, not sharp, not bitter—jasmine, violet is what I’m getting. Not quite fruit. Maybe in the finish, when I hold it in my mouth, but afterwards just the aroma remains, and it sticks on the tongue and roof and the back of my throat as if I’d walked through a perfume aisle, but y’know. More pleasant.

Third flash steep was almost thick, not quite roasty—this is a pretty smooth dan cong. One of these days I will properly sit down and compare some of my favourite dan congs side by side. I can have trouble describing them in isolation.

By about the fifth steep the aroma’s trailed off; upped to 15 seconds brought some bitterness, dropping back to 5-10.

Flavors: Floral, Jasmine, Perfume, Violet

Login or sign up to leave a comment.