Taiwan "Shui Xian" Oolong Tea

Tea type
Oolong Tea
Ingredients
Oolong Tea Leaves
Flavors
Autumn Leaf Pile, Cinnamon, Fruity, Maple Syrup, Pear, Roasted, Wood, Brown Toast, Camphor, Cherry, Coffee, Dried Fruit, Floral, Flowers, Honey, Mineral, Molasses, Nuts, Peach, Petrichor, Pine, Plant Stems, Resin, Smoke, Spicy, Sweet, Stonefruit, Tobacco, Baked Bread, Char, Cream, Herbaceous, Raisins, Sugar
Sold in
Loose Leaf
Caffeine
Not available
Certification
Not available
Edit tea info Last updated by derk
Average preparation
205 °F / 96 °C 4 min, 0 sec 5 g 5 oz / 159 ml

Currently unavailable

We don't know when or if this item will be available.

From Our Community

1 Image

0 Want it Want it

10 Own it Own it

7 Tasting Notes View all

  • “Eureka! Huzzah! I let my husband take a whiff of my first cup from derk, promised him I would not force him to sample it, but he did anyway. First sip: “Well, it doesn’t taste like flowers.”...” Read full tasting note
  • “I broke into a new tea I have stored for a year or so… as it was ordered to my address by White Antlers, but I had other oolongs to drink and opened. Ass the packages are non-resealable, I was...” Read full tasting note
    78
  • “A mystery oolong pick from a joint buy with Leafhopper, May 2020 harvest. Aroma in bag is fruity with dried cherries and has the Si Ji Chun cultivar-specific florality which I can’t describe. Dry...” Read full tasting note
    80
  • “Interesting look: large curly leaves, prominent stalks. Intriguing aroma: both dry – stone fruits, fallen leaves, smoke – and wet – mineral, resin, pine smoke. Enjoyable taste: mineral, spice,...” Read full tasting note
    90

From What-Cha

A Taiwanese take on a Chinese classic, with the expected (yet gentler) roasted notes combined with a smooth floral taste expected of a Taiwanese cultivar.

Tasting Notes:
- Smooth texture
- Roasted notes combined with a floral quality
- Non-dominant roast

Harvest: Winter, December 2018

Origin: Ming Jian, Nantou County, Taiwan
Altitude: 350m
Sourced: Specialist Taiwanese wholesaler

Cultivar: Si Ji Chun (Four Seasons)
Oxidisation: 15-20%
Roast: Medium
Picking: Machine

Brewing Advice:
- Heat water to roughly 95°C/203°F
- Use 2 teaspoons per cup/small teapot
- Brew for 3-4 minutes

Packaging: Non-resealable vacuum-sealed bag packaged in Taiwan

About What-Cha View company

Company description not available.

7 Tasting Notes

2474 tasting notes

Eureka! Huzzah! I let my husband take a whiff of my first cup from derk, promised him I would not force him to sample it, but he did anyway. First sip: “Well, it doesn’t taste like flowers.” Follow-up sip: “I approve.” High praise indeed!

Other reviews capture this a lot more eloquently, but if you want the quick Midwest farmer version—it’s a very stemmy oolong that tips the needle toward woody and twiggy rather than fruity and floral, especially as it cools. I saw comparisons to houjicha; I get that, and I’d add a similarity to kukicha—in my cup, anyway.

Hoping you are thankful today, even you friends who don’t get the day off! Tea friends are definitely on the list of blessings I’m counting!

Evol Ving Ness

Happy day of thanks to you!

derk

Happy Thanksgiving to you, gmathis.

Rosehips

Happy Thanksgiving!

CrowKettle

Happy Thanksgiving!

Martin Bednář

Happy Thanksgiving!

ashmanra

Happy Thanksgiving!

Login or sign up to leave a comment.

78
1169 tasting notes

I broke into a new tea I have stored for a year or so… as it was ordered to my address by White Antlers, but I had other oolongs to drink and opened. Ass the packages are non-resealable, I was finishing opened ones first.

It seems I got pretty much same package as derk have. May 2020 harvest.

Prepared western today, which is kind of heresy for oolong, but whatever.

It has got a very nice aromas, I noticed mostly woody cinnamon, roasted pears, roasted generally. I liked it and just for aroma it is a winner. However…

taste was nice. But something was lacking, maybe some depth. It was really subtle in flavours, though it was complex. I have noticed again some woodiness, lightly fruity, autumn leaves (thanks derk, I know the flavour, but couldn’t point on it) and some sweet, like maple syrup aftertaste.

Flavors: Autumn Leaf Pile, Cinnamon, Fruity, Maple Syrup, Pear, Roasted, Wood

Preparation
205 °F / 96 °C 4 min, 0 sec 3 tsp 10 OZ / 300 ML

Login or sign up to leave a comment.

80
1126 tasting notes

A mystery oolong pick from a joint buy with Leafhopper, May 2020 harvest.

Aroma in bag is fruity with dried cherries and has the Si Ji Chun cultivar-specific florality which I can’t describe. Dry in hand smells roasted. Warm brings chicory coffee, molasses and brown toast and the rinse displays a sour roast note with woodiness.

The aroma is of roasted pears, dried peaches, chicory and cinnamon. Happy and comforting. The taste is weak at first but does build. It starts slightly nutty and mineral with a background roast and floral character. Clean tulip and little bit sweet aftertaste. Next cups begin with a mellow burst of woody spice which transitions smoothly to an impression of a damp, overcast fall day — autumn leaf, muted petrichor, pine resin, a whisper of smoke, unripened peach still clinging to the branch, twiggy sweetness, all rather subtle. A touch of camphor lingers, like taking a cold breath. Later steeps are nutty sweet maybe with a bit of honey, roastier.

This tea could be perceived as flavorless; I’d say it has subtle depth. Even with a rinse, it does need a long first steep in a gaiwan, maybe 45 seconds, back off a little bit with the next and increase from there. I like the character of this tea. It’s comforting like a Chinese Wuyi shui xian oolong but much more unassuming, giving a clue to its Taiwanese origin.

Flavors: Autumn Leaf Pile, Brown Toast, Camphor, Cherry, Cinnamon, Coffee, Dried Fruit, Floral, Flowers, Honey, Mineral, Molasses, Nuts, Peach, Pear, Petrichor, Pine, Plant Stems, Resin, Roasted, Smoke, Spicy, Sweet, Wood

Leafhopper

I’m glad you once again got more from this tea than I did. Maybe the longer steeps were the secret, though I think it’s more probable that I don’t enjoy most roasted teas.

Login or sign up to leave a comment.

90
224 tasting notes

Interesting look: large curly leaves, prominent stalks.
Intriguing aroma: both dry – stone fruits, fallen leaves, smoke – and wet – mineral, resin, pine smoke.
Enjoyable taste: mineral, spice, smoke, camphor, tobacco, dark honeyed sweetness.
Also, it resteeps well and leaves a pleasant lingering aftertaste.
This is a very smooth roasted oolong that is cheerful, dependable, and lacks any obvious flaws or imbalances. Taiwan oolongs are rarely leave me excited due to their subtlety but I really liked this one.

Flavors: Autumn Leaf Pile, Camphor, Mineral, Pine, Resin, Smoke, Spicy, Stonefruit, Sweet, Tobacco

Login or sign up to leave a comment.

87
1018 tasting notes

Alright, I’m finally back. Not only have I been swamped at work for the last week, but I have had very limited internet access at home, so posting reviews ended up falling by the wayside for me. I finally managed to regain consistent internet access this morning, so now I am taking a break to get some stuff posted here. My lack of activity would not allow anyone to know it, but I have been on a huge Shui Xian kick for the last little bit and have taken to comparing teas from different terroirs. This tea went head to head with an old bush Zhengyan Shui Xian, and surprisingly enough, it came out the winner in my eyes.

I prepared this tea gongfu style. After a rinse, I steeped 6 grams of loose tea leaves in 4 ounces of 203 F water for 6 seconds. This infusion was followed by 15 additional infusions. Steep times for these infusions were as follows: 9 seconds, 12 seconds, 16 seconds, 20 seconds, 25 seconds, 30 seconds, 40 seconds, 50 seconds, 1 minute, 1 minute 15 seconds, 1 minute 30 seconds, 2 minutes, 3 minutes, 5 minutes, and 7 minutes.

Prior to the rinse, the dry leaves emitted aromas of char, pine, honey, and raisin underscored by a hint of cinnamon. After the rinse, I noted the emergence of stronger char and pine aromas as well as a hint of baked bread. The first infusion then introduced a hint of rock sugar to the nose. In the mouth, the tea liquor offered up notes of char, pine, honey, raisin, cinnamon, and rock sugar backed by hints of baked bread. Subsequent infusions saw the nose turn creamier and a bit spicier. New notes of minerals, cream, spruce, and juniper showed up in the mouth. The final infusions offered notes of minerals, char, and pine that quickly gave way to subtler notes of cream, raisin, and rock sugar.

At first, I did not know what to make of this tea. I am very used to Wuyi Shui Xian, so this seemed very soft and subtle in comparison. Taking my time with each infusion, however, yielded tremendous rewards. Once I adjusted to the tea’s softer, smoother, simpler character, I found an easy-drinking tea with admirable longevity and great texture in the mouth. Should What-Cha ever restock this tea, I will most definitely be buying more. It made for a great break from the heavier traditional Wuyi Shui Xian oolongs to which I am so accustomed.

Flavors: Baked Bread, Char, Cinnamon, Cream, Herbaceous, Honey, Mineral, Pine, Raisins, Sugar

Preparation
6 g 4 OZ / 118 ML
What-Cha

Glad you enjoyed it, sadly the batches from my supplier were very inconsistent with some very heavy in twigs, so I’ve had to reluctantly drop the tea from the main lineup but I’ll bring it back occasionally as a mystery tea.

Login or sign up to leave a comment.

75
46 tasting notes

Interesting tea. It has a complex and strong scent to it, but the taste itself is somewhat bland to me. I can’t quite articulate what the scent is, except that I’ve smelled it before…I almost want to say mineral chocolate without there actually being any chocolate smell. Would that maybe be malt instead? It’s not earthy, it’s not nutty, it’s “not” many things…

I don’t know. It’s not a terrible tea, I just struggle in explaining what it IS, instead of what it ISN’T.

You know…I think the scent is similar to a cinnamon-tasting tea I had, except there’s not really a cinnamon taste to the tea. It’s has a similarity to the scent of a cinnamony tea I had, minus the cinnamon. But I suppose that’s another round of saying what this tea isn’t, instead of what it IS.

This’ll be my new puzzle as I try to figure it out in future steeps. I’m pretty sure it’s just because I haven’t had enough organoleptic training…

Login or sign up to leave a comment.

62 tasting notes

This tea has a velvety texture and hits with an immediate burst of charcoal, spicy and ever so slightly sweet, and the smooth roasted aftertaste has a unique peat smokiness to it. Highly suggestive of houjicha, but with more depth of flavor. Wonderful.

Login or sign up to leave a comment.