Tea type
Tea
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Flavors
Green Wood, Honeysuckle, Malt, Mint, Oak, Red Wine, Tannin, Leather, Peanut
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Caffeine
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Edit tea info Last updated by Daylon R Thomas
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From Trident Booksellers and Cafe Boulder Colorado

The Honey Black is a very thick Yunnan black tea high in aroma with a persistent aftertaste. Grown in Ning’er county in Southern Yunnan, China, this tea comes from an older assamica varietal. It is pungent and sweet with floral and minty notes atop a base of heavy malts. Very good for Western or gong-fu style brewing, it would make a good choice for those who enjoy power as well as subtlety in their tea.

Origin – Ning’er, Yunnan, China

Harvest – March 2021

Tastes Like – Strong Malts, Spearmint, Honeysuckles

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3 Tasting Notes

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4190 tasting notes

From Daylon R Thomas!  Thanks so much!   I keep trying this one, but the flavor is so mild and not very distinct, that I then hesitate to write a note.  But I guess I should, just to say that there isn’t much flavor.  I do think it is interesting that this particular Honey Black has a ton of gold to the leaf.  Which makes it even weirder that the flavors aren’t anywhere close to something that would taste like a Chinese black tea, like this appears to be.  I would have guessed it was Golden Monkey if I were just looking at the leaf and had no description for it.  I would say the most distinct note is oak with a slight bite to it.  BUT that was when I severely oversteeped the second cup.  I do wish there was more flavor here, but I always like when my expectations for tea are thrown when I look at a leaf and think I will know what it tastes like.  I like being wrong! 
Steep #1 // 2 teaspoons for a mug // 19 minutes after boiling // 2 minute steep
Steep #2 //  just boiled // (many minute steep – forgot about it) 

Daylon R Thomas

I agree. I’m sorry if I gave you a mediocre one. I really wanted to like it, but I thought the same thing. Malt with some minor elements gong fu. The briskness got to me personally.

tea-sipper

PLEASE no apologizing! I’m grateful to try any tea, even those that others haven’t loved, as everyone has different tastes anyway. Thanks again :D

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1705 tasting notes

I have too much black tea. I’ve been mostly guzzling my flavored teas and oolongs, but I have barely touched some of my black ones from Spirit and Trident. As winter comes in, the tannins strike differently and I’ve been able to enjoy these a little bit more. I got more peanut, leather, and malt vibes yesterday which were welcome.

The problem with blacks is I’ve gotten more sensitive to caffeine, and my stomach has been upset easily. I don’t know what is causing it-I drink plenty of water, and though I’ve been stressed, I’ve been able to manage a lot better than previous years. Either way, I have had to stick to milder teas lately. I am thinking about selling or getting rid of a good portion of my stash. The majority of them are higher end malty Chinese blacks like this one and Nepal blacks, with some Darjeelings I’ve barely touched. On the flipside, I have been going through my green teas a lot quicker lately.

Flavors: Leather, Malt, Oak, Peanut

Leafhopper

Caffeine sensitivity fluctuates for me. I never get an upset stomach, but I sometimes have trouble sleeping if I drink tea too late in the day. This can go on for a couple weeks, then seems to fade, and I can drink tea in the early evening again. I’d hold on to your stash for a while to see if your sensitivity resolves.

I seem to be on the opposite trajectory as you are, as I’m gravitating more toward black tea as the weather gets colder. However, I like fruity Fujian and Taiwanese hongcha, not the malty Yunnan varieties.

Daylon R Thomas

Yunnan’s are hit or miss for me. I get foolishly sold by “cocoa notes” nevermind some have more malt than I prefer. I also got a bunch of Himalayan ones that were tippy from trident. They are very good, but I’ve barely touched them, even my Fujian Wuyi Blacks.

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