2018 Semi-Wild Ai Jiao Pinglin Oolong

Tea type
Oolong Tea
Ingredients
Not available
Flavors
Apple, Apricot, Biting, Brown Sugar, Burnt Sugar, Char, Cinnamon, Dry Grass, Earth, Eucalyptus, Flowers, Ginger, Grain, Grass, Honey, Meat, Milk, Mineral, Orange, Orchid, Perfume, Raspberry, Roasted Nuts, Violet, Walnut, Wood, Floral, Roasted, Stonefruit
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Loose Leaf
Caffeine
Not available
Certification
Not available
Edit tea info Last updated by Leafhopper
Average preparation
Boiling 6 g 4 oz / 110 ml

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2 Tasting Notes View all

  • “The impression is of a somewhat savory, alkaline mineral water with a lingering, disconnected roast. White lily, orchid and ginger leaf provide the higher floral and grassy notes. A body of dry...” Read full tasting note
  • “Yay! This is my two hundredth tasting note. I’m glad I’ve had the opportunity to develop my palate on Steepster and to meet so many fellow tea people. This is truly a great community, one that I...” Read full tasting note
    85

From TheTea

To be honest – this is one of the best taiwanese oolong I’ve ever tasted. It comes from small and semi-wild garden in Pinglin, and – what is most interesting – it is made from old cultivar Ai Jiao which is famous in Wuyishan. The unusual and fullbodied taste comes from the harvest period and natural farming. Cause the farmer do not uses any pesticides, the jassids can bite the tea leaves what creates interesting flowery tastes and aromas you can find in Bai Hao Oolong or Gui Fei Oolong.

This gentle roasted and medium oxidized tea delivers wide pallete of flavours! Dry leaves smells fresh, grassy and flowery (a little bit like high-end grade of fresh olive oil). When you infuse Ai Jiao, you find also lots of spring honey, raspberries with hints of sandal wood or cinnamon.

About TheTea View company

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2 Tasting Notes

1026 tasting notes

The impression is of a somewhat savory, alkaline mineral water with a lingering, disconnected roast. White lily, orchid and ginger leaf provide the higher floral and grassy notes. A body of dry grass, millet, sandalwood, walnut shell and faint warm, dry earth mixed with tones of apricot-orange-eucalyptus-balsam, golden raspberries, soft Ceylon cinnamon, crystallized honey-brown sugar, scalded milk. Sometimes I’d get fleeting impressions of yellow apples cooked in bacon grease, roasted pepitas, yellow currants, burnt sugar. The aftertaste was not a focal point of this tea, but I did sense sugared violets at one point.

While the mouthfeel and longevity are lacking, the roast brought out very pleasant, sweet incense-like aromatics that perfumed my room. Overall, I found this to be an enjoyable offering and I’m happy to have had the chance to try it. Thank you for sharing, Leafhopper, and exposing me to TheTea.pl. They look to have interesting options :)

Flavors: Apple, Apricot, Biting, Brown Sugar, Burnt Sugar, Char, Cinnamon, Dry Grass, Earth, Eucalyptus, Flowers, Ginger, Grain, Grass, Honey, Meat, Milk, Mineral, Orange, Orchid, Perfume, Raspberry, Roasted Nuts, Violet, Walnut, Wood

Preparation
205 °F / 96 °C 5 g 3 OZ / 100 ML
Martin Bednář

That was a bad idea checking it out… I am pretty much sure the shipping to neighbor country would be cheap. Ahh!

derk

Focus, Martin!

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85
282 tasting notes

Yay! This is my two hundredth tasting note. I’m glad I’ve had the opportunity to develop my palate on Steepster and to meet so many fellow tea people. This is truly a great community, one that I hope to continue participating in for a long time to come.

I bought this oolong two years ago. Ai Jiao is usually a Wuyi varietal (and I had a not-too-impressive example of that version a few years ago), so naturally, I was curious to see how it would take to my favourite terroir, which seems to be all of Taiwan. I steeped 6 g of leaf in a 120 ml teapot using boiling water for 25, 20, 25, 30, 30, 45, 60, 90, 120, and 240 seconds.

The dry aroma is of honey, flowers, grass, roast, and faint stonefruit. The first steep has notes of honey, raspberry, roasted grains, apricot, and grass. The honey, roast, and grains become more prominent in steep two, and the roast gets even stronger in subsequent steeps, with a hint of roasted walnuts. Though the stonefruit, berries, and flowers put in sporadic appearances throughout the next few steeps, mostly what I can taste is the honey and roast.

As someone who prefers greener oolongs, I’m not the ideal drinker for this tea, but I do appreciate its complexity. Maybe after another two hundred reviews I’ll be able to look past the roast to understand the full spectrum of flavours, though by then this tea will probably be gone.

Flavors: Apricot, Floral, Grain, Grass, Honey, Raspberry, Roasted, Stonefruit, Walnut

Preparation
Boiling 6 g 4 OZ / 120 ML
Martin Bednář

I completely agree with you regarding the taste development. It certainly develops and I notice more and more with every drank tea. And congratulations to your 200!

And about the people here… yes, we are here so welcoming I would not believe it is even possible!

White Antlers

Congratulations on your 200 reviews! That is a wonderful accomplishment and a lot of tea! : )

Leafhopper

Martin and White Antlers, thanks! Though I’m by no means a tea expert, I’m definitely noticing more than I did when I started and there isn’t so much guesswork involved. And yes, I’ve gone through a lot of tea, though my cupboard is strangely still as full, if not fuller, than it was three years ago when I joined Steepster! Now how could that be? :P

Veronica

Congratulations on 200 reviews!

Leafhopper

Thanks! You’re way ahead of me. :)

mrmopar

200 Go!

derk

I always look forward to your contributions, Leafhopper. Hope to see many more.

tea-sipper

Happy 200 thoughtful notes. :D I can’t wait until I can taste pass the roast on an oolong… though I might not ever be able to. haha

ashmanra

Happy 200, and many more!

Leafhopper

Thanks, all of you, for your good wishes! Most roasted oolongs still taste similar to me, but I’m working on it!

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