Biscotti

Tea type
Black Tea
Ingredients
Almonds, Black Tea, Elderflowers, Natural Flavours
Flavors
Not available
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Loose Leaf
Caffeine
Not available
Certification
Not available
Edit tea info Last updated by AJ
Average preparation
Boiling 5 min, 0 sec

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1 Tasting Note View all

  • “Dry, this smells strongly of scented markers I used to play with growing up. I couldn’t say which scent—vanilla or popcorn or some baked good ones. Sweet and a bit plasticy, but good. Brewed, this...” Read full tasting note

From T Kettle

Biscotti! Miscotti! This is the real deal. A taste that screams full sweet almond.

Si, si…biscotti. Molto bene. This crunchy double-baked almondy treat is said to have originated in what is now Tuscany, where it was commonly transported on war campaigns by Roman legions. Somewhere along the line, biscotti became standard fare at cafés everywhere, and the rest is history. We’ve captured the warm bakey, almond-forward flavour. Prego!

About T Kettle View company

T. Kettle offers a large, premium assortment of original and new loose-leaf tea blends naturally sourced, certified vegan, kosher, and organic yielding rich flavours.

1 Tasting Note

458 tasting notes

Dry, this smells strongly of scented markers I used to play with growing up. I couldn’t say which scent—vanilla or popcorn or some baked good ones. Sweet and a bit plasticy, but good.

Brewed, this smells… Honestly, like how cookie and biscotti smell after you’ve dipped them into tea and they’ve gone soft. It’s very distinct. And very fitting. So it smells good, like biscotti, like tea and milk and honey.

Taste wise… Surprisingly a bit astringent, even though I was very careful with my five minutes this time, and the tea itself looked at first glance like the small curled leaves of a Chinese black tea (the glossyness, in retrospect, might have been flavouring oil). But taste-wise, Sri Lankan. Maybe blended with a Chinese black, and/or some Assam. I always have difficulty picking out bases under flavouring. It’s faintly astringent but not enough to turn you away; there’s a faintly oily mouthfeel of almonds, like a sweet almond oil of some sort, that trails into the aftertaste as I breath out. Unfortunately the baked goods in the smell don’t translate much into the taste. Mostly just almond. Not something I’d reach for in the future, as the astringency is verging on bitterness. I’m sure this would be very nostalgic and pleasant with milk, though.

I’m slowly working my way through a bunch of ounce teas I picked up in-store. I came in knowing exactly what I wanted beforehand. Saves you time, energy, social interaction. I’m typing this while working on a blog post about upcoming tea-book releases. There’s a couple of books I’m excited for in 2021. It’s a nice, lazy Sunday.

Preparation
Boiling 5 min, 0 sec
Roswell Strange

I’ll definitely keep an eye out for your tasting notes – I’m really curious what you think of their blends.

AJ

So far I’m finding either their black tea base or the flavouring oils they use unusually harsh. And there are a couple of blends I think I can pinpoint the wholesalers on… We’ll see if this is where my paycheque goes.

Roswell Strange

They’re definitely wholesaling from MTC, but I have a veeerrrryyyy good suspicion of a second wholesaler they’re working with. Unsure if it’s more than just the two, though.

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