Tea type
Green Tea
Ingredients
Green Tea
Flavors
Broth, Brussels Sprouts, Chestnut, Grain, Grass, Kabocha, Kale, Nori, Nuts, Roasted Nuts, Savory, Seaweed, Spinach, Squash, Toasted, Umami, Vegetable Broth, Vegetables, Vegetal, Asparagus, Dry Grass, Earth, Soybean, Straw
Sold in
Loose Leaf
Caffeine
Medium
Certification
Not available
Edit tea info Last updated by Cameron B.
Average preparation
170 °F / 76 °C 1 min, 0 sec 5 g 8 oz / 250 ml

Currently unavailable

We don't know when or if this item will be available.

From Our Community

2 Images

0 Want it Want it

1 Own it Own it

2 Tasting Notes View all

  • “Sipdown! (29 | 126) I haven’t been doing as well with having an Obubu tea every day lately, so I need to get back into that! I think I just have too many sipdown categories to keep up with at the...” Read full tasting note
    82
  • “I was excited to try this tea as I haven’t had kukicha in ages. This sample was once again courtesy of Cameron who has been broadening my Japanese tea horizons. Just looking at the leaves, I could...” Read full tasting note
    84

From Kyoto Obubu Tea Farms

Light in body with a smooth quality, Mejiro is subtly sweet with flavor notes of tomato and fresh nuts. It has a grassy aroma mixed with raw chestnuts. Striking pale yellow green in color, Mejiro is the highest grade of Kukicha available and is made from the stems of the Tencha used to produce our drinking grade Matcha during the Spring harvest.

Taste: Umami
Body: Light
Texture: Rounded
Length: Long
Harvest: May
Tea Cultivar: Mixed
Origin: Wazuka
Cultivation: Shaded
Processing: Steamed, Dried

About Kyoto Obubu Tea Farms View company

It started with a single cup of tea. As the legend goes, our president Akihiro Kita, or Akky-san, visited Wazuka, Kyoto one fateful day. At the time, Akky-san was still a college student in search for life's calling. After trying the region's famous Ujicha (literally meaning tea from the Uji district), he immediately fell in love and his passion for green tea was born. He had finally found what he was looking for in that one simple cup of tea. After fifteen years of learning to master the art of growing tea from tea farmers in Wazuka, Kyoto Obubu Tea Farms was born and as they say, the rest is history. So what's an Obubu? Obubu is the Kyoto slang for tea. Here in the international department we call ourselves Obubu Tea. That's "Tea Tea" for the bilinguals. We love tea so much, we just had to have it twice in our name. Now Obubu means more than just tea to us. It means, family, friends, passion and the place we call home. More than just tea. Though the roots of Obubu stem from tea, it has become more than that over the years. Obubu is an agricultural social venture, operating with three (1) bring quality Japanese tea to the world (2) contribute to the local and global community through tea (3) revitalize interest in tea and agriculture through education.

2 Tasting Notes

82
3052 tasting notes

Sipdown! (29 | 126)

I haven’t been doing as well with having an Obubu tea every day lately, so I need to get back into that! I think I just have too many sipdown categories to keep up with at the moment, so something gets left out.

Anyway! This is a spring harvest kukicha, and a byproduct of matcha production. And you can definitely tell the stems came from a shaded tea, there’s a bit of that dense vegetal character. It is overall quite savory, with darker and more cruciferous flavors like kale and Brussels sprouts, with an undercurrent of umami toasted nori and squash notes. I don’t really pick up on any sweetness whatsoever, which is interesting. There is definitely nuttiness though, and it’s a rich sort of nut, maybe even very slightly roasted. I see LuckyMe mentioned chestnut and that seems about right to me.

I haven’t had kukicha in a little while and was expecting this to be a lighter and sweeter tea, and was definitely surprised ha ha! But I suppose it makes sense, given this tea was shaded almost as long as a gyokuro. I do have more of this in stash, along with a couple of Obubu’s other kukicha.

Flavors: Broth, Brussels Sprouts, Chestnut, Grain, Grass, Kabocha, Kale, Nori, Nuts, Roasted Nuts, Savory, Seaweed, Spinach, Squash, Toasted, Umami, Vegetable Broth, Vegetables, Vegetal

Preparation
175 °F / 79 °C 1 min, 0 sec 5 g 7 OZ / 200 ML
gmathis

Yum! I know I have a little partial ounce of kukicha somewhere—this makes me want to go home NOW and dig it out.

Cameron B.

Do it! Although kukicha is such a wide spectrum, who knows how different it will be ha ha.

Login or sign up to leave a comment.

84
625 tasting notes

I was excited to try this tea as I haven’t had kukicha in ages. This sample was once again courtesy of Cameron who has been broadening my Japanese tea horizons.

Just looking at the leaves, I could tell this was different from the twiggy kukichas I’ve had before. In fact, it looked more like a standard Sencha with its mostly forestry green leaf and absence of any thick twigs and stems.

The leaves themselves have a very light grassy aroma but upon heating, emit a strong aroma of steamed asparagus. Sure enough, the asparagus came through in the first steep along with umami and edamame. The second infusion is kabusecha like and heavier on the grass. More specifically dry grass on a hot summer day. Last infusion was earthy with a light brothyness and notes of edamame and chestnut.

This was a really interesting tea that evolves over steeps. It’s decidedly more vegetal than Sencha and adds a unique spin on familiar flavor profile. This is a high grade kukicha that holds its own against any Japanese green.

Flavors: Asparagus, Chestnut, Dry Grass, Earth, Soybean, Straw, Umami

Preparation
165 °F / 73 °C 1 min, 0 sec 5 g 10 OZ / 300 ML
Cameron B.

Kukicha really is a huge range of different teas! The greener ones like this are a byproduct of matcha production. I’ve had the twiggy kind too and like both!

LuckyMe

Very cool, didn’t realize kukicha was such a broad spectrum. It’s definitely on my radar now!

Login or sign up to leave a comment.