Spring 2019 Mangjing

Tea type
Pu-erh Tea
Ingredients
Not available
Flavors
Baked Bread, Bitter, Black Pepper, Butter, Citrus Zest, Floral, Flowers, Meat, Milk, Nutty, Olives, Smoke, Sweet, Tart, Vegetal, Wood
Sold in
Bulk
Caffeine
Not available
Certification
Not available
Edit tea info Last updated by Togo
Average preparation
200 °F / 93 °C 0 min, 15 sec 7 g 4 oz / 110 ml

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  • “This tea from “greater Jingmai area” is light bodied with a very up-front floral but not perfumy character. I am not a big fan overall, but I do like its creeping, grounding cha qi that induces a...” Read full tasting note
    73

From Farmerleaf

Ai Leng Ancient Garden, Mangjing Village, Jingmai Mountain.
Picked on March 28th
Hand-processed in Mangjing
Available in 357g pu-erh tea cakes

In the heat of the Spring season, we visited our friend Ai Gong. He lives in Mangjing, a mountain adjacent to Jingmai, 10km away from our village. The altitude is 200m lower than our mountain, it peaks at 1400m. It is populated by the Bulang minority, unlike Jingmai, which is Dai.
Ai Gong has set up a nice tea factory in his home, he started in 2010, just like us, we’ve known each other for that long. On this sunny day of late March, we were sipping tea as his family was picking the tea in the gardens. His best plot is located on Ai Leng mountain, a steep peak with a distinct shape. The leaves in Mangjing are smaller than the ones that grow in Jingmai, the varietal is probably slightly different, despite the close distance between our respective mountains.

As the pickers returned home, we collected their leaves and heated up the wok. We processed the leaves with the technique used in our Jingmai factory: hot start and warm finish, enough steaming to ensure a 20-minute-session and enough moisture left in the leave not to overcook them.

We came back the next day to collect the leaves, 18kg of the best ‘gushu’ material you can get in Mangjing. The tea shares a common character with our jingmai gulan, but it has a different fragrance, more minerality (probably due to the higher amount of old trees in the gardens) and a somewhat more aggressive profile. Jingmai and Mangjing are like two brothers with different personalities.

You will get your money’s worth with this tea.

About Farmerleaf View company

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1 Tasting Note

73
626 tasting notes

This tea from “greater Jingmai area” is light bodied with a very up-front floral but not perfumy character. I am not a big fan overall, but I do like its creeping, grounding cha qi that induces a great mind-clarity.

In the aroma, there are notes of light smoke, citrus zest, beef and focaccia. Taste is sweet and flowery with a milk note initially. Soon enough, a nice bitterness appears that has a tart and nutty backbone. The finish is buttery and the aftertaste vegetal, cooling and sweet with notes of olives and peach. Later on in the session there is also a hint of an interesting black pepper like taste and a more woody character overall. All in all, there is complexity, but I didn’t find the profile to be particularly enjoyable. The tea also doesn’t really last beyond 200 ml/g worth of infusions.

Flavors: Baked Bread, Bitter, Black Pepper, Butter, Citrus Zest, Floral, Flowers, Meat, Milk, Nutty, Olives, Smoke, Sweet, Tart, Vegetal, Wood

Preparation
200 °F / 93 °C 0 min, 15 sec 7 g 4 OZ / 110 ML
mrmopar

I have a hard time with YiWu and JingMai so I can relate.

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