Labrador Tea Grade 1

Tea type
Herbal Tea
Ingredients
Labrador Tea
Flavors
Camphor, Cedar, Citrus, Petrichor, Pine, Resin, Spring Water, Sweet, Tannin, Thick
Sold in
Loose Leaf
Caffeine
Caffeine Free
Certification
Not available
Edit tea info Last updated by derk
Average preparation
195 °F / 90 °C 8 min or more 8 oz / 250 ml

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2 Tasting Notes View all

  • “Last year, or was it early this year, I placed an order with Camellia Sinensis because I saw they offered some unique herbal teas that are wild-harvested from Québec. Labrador tea is in the genus...” Read full tasting note
  • “When tea drinkers live dangerously. That’s actually kind of true here. Apparently you’re really not supposed to drink this stuff if you’re pregnant or breastfeeding, and it has a ‘slightly...” Read full tasting note

From Camellia Sinensis

Composition : Buds, stems and small leaves of Labrador tea
(Rhododendron groenlandicum)

From the peatland of Lake Saint-Jean, the downy leaves of this native plant of the Rhododendron genus disclose, in infusion, a lively and light liquor, supported by strong citrus and camphor aromas. Its vegetal character is reminiscent of lichen and cedar. Anti-inflammatory and decongestant, its essential oil is also calming.

Its essential oil is considered anti-inflammatory, antispasmodic, antibacterial, decongestant and effective in treating various broncho pulmonary diseases (not surprising that many indigenous First Nations have adopted it to fight colds and flu), Labrador tea is also known for its calming and slightly stupefying influence helping to combat insomnia and anxiety; it is also acknowledged in the role of hepatic draining and regeneration of liver cells. Lastly it is a digestive, aids the menstrual cycle and help in the process of labour in women about to give birth.

Please note: Because of its high tannin, high doses or extended infusion can cause cramps and stomach aches. It is therefore better not infuse too long and to ration consumption. Consumption is also not recommended for women pregnant six months or less and children under six years old.

About Camellia Sinensis View company

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2 Tasting Notes

1134 tasting notes

Last year, or was it early this year, I placed an order with Camellia Sinensis because I saw they offered some unique herbal teas that are wild-harvested from Québec. Labrador tea is in the genus Rhododendron — the leaf underside and stems are covered in a dense, rust-hued fur.

It smells so good in the bag, like an evergreen forest. It reminds me of my times in Canada, the Pacific Northwest and of the wintertime redwood forest here in northern California. Crisp, clean air. Breathe. This is the kind of fresh smell that makes me aware of my own being and the lightness of mind and body I am capable of achieving in nature. It elicits a sense of presence, away from the smells of humans and the industrial worlds we create.

In the description on this page, Camellia Sinensis says of this tea: “a lively and light liquor, supported by strong citrus and camphor aromas. Its vegetal character is reminiscent of lichen and cedar.”

Had I not read that, I would describe it as… let’s see… the same as the smell of the leaf but with some sweetness of strange origin, a thickness that reminds me of silver needle white teas, perhaps due to the fur. Cool evergreen forests. There’s also a bit of pungency — resinous, tar-like, reminding me of kerosene? more than sap. You know, it also reminds me a lot of Bitterleaf Tea’s Jingmai Crab Legs but without the hint of milkiness (https://steepster.com/teas/bitterleaf-teas/78526-2016-jing-mai-crab-legs) and of Juniper Ridge’s Douglas Fir Spring Tips with a thicker, more robust, sweet taste and less of a “green” flavor (https://steepster.com/teas/juniper-ridge/14722-douglas-fir-spring-tips).

It’s recommended by the internet-at-large to not steep these leaves and stems for more than 5-6 minutes due to a high concentration of tannins in the tea that can cause stomachache. I tried to follow the parameters on the bag with 2tsp (crumbled), 250mL, 90C for 4-5 minutes but time often gets away from me. With what was probably an 8-minute steep, I did experience some bloating and big gurgles about an hour later. With that, though, also came an intense sleepiness. I was out. Labrador tea is used as a treatment for insomnia which wasn’t the purpose of my drinking but dang did it work, and it has worked the few other times I’ve sipped.

Flavors: Camphor, Cedar, Citrus, Petrichor, Pine, Resin, Spring Water, Sweet, Tannin, Thick

Preparation
195 °F / 90 °C 8 min or more 2 tsp 8 OZ / 250 ML
Mastress Alita

I’ll have to try this sometime and see how it holds up in comparison to valerian root for helping me sleep.

Martin Bednář

I still have that sample from you but haven’t found a situation for it. Maybe one day!

Natethesnake

I wonder how closely related this would be to the Holly or chrysanthemum family as I’m allergic to kuding Cha and snow chrysanthemum. Sound interesting and I’m an insomniac who loves the smell of bog vegetation in Newfoundland and Labrador.

derk

Mastress Alita – I can send you some if you want. Little goes a long way.

Martin – worth a try since you seem to long for Finland :)

Natethesnake – as far as relation, all three plants are in the same Class but differ in Order. Labrador tea is in the heath Family, which includes other bog plants like cranberries and blueberries. Since you’re allergic to holly, I assume yerba maté and yaupon aren’t in your cupboard?

Martin Bednář

Ah, I see your point :) Well, it will come one day and then it will be that time! It seems it will be soon as… I have been there 5 years ago? Wait… really? Well. Indeed. Sad :(

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142 tasting notes

When tea drinkers live dangerously. That’s actually kind of true here. Apparently you’re really not supposed to drink this stuff if you’re pregnant or breastfeeding, and it has a ‘slightly stupefying’ relaxing effect. So it’s basically beer. In flavor it reminds me of….gin? Definitely a bit medicinal but not bad. It’s just a little piney. I’m definitely relaxed, but then, I’m spending an evening drinking tea, reading a cookbook, and playing with my dog. Really hard to pin down the culprit here. Still, I really think I need to keep this around.

TeaNecromancer

Neat! I did not know that any of the Rhododendron’s species were non-toxic (but I am so not a plant expert) I will have to give it a try.

Flowery

Well, maybe ‘mildly toxic’ is the right description, at least if I’m interpreting WebMD’s summary correctly. I can live with that.

TeaBrat

sounds like I might need to try it :)

TeaNecromancer

Yeah, I can live with mildly toxic ;)

Stephanie

interesting…

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