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Back into my 5g sample box. Brewed this 2 different ways today, grandpa for me and
twice western for the partner in crime while I stole some sips for tasting notes. This tea doesn’t hold up to grandpa style as well as western. Grandpa numbed my tastebuds for some reason. Western had a clearer aroma and taste and greater longevity. The second round of western was more experimental in which I purposefully let it overbrew and used 190F in a few steeps since I was making a baozhong oolong for myself. Neither long steep times nor high temp killed the tea.

Noted below is the first round I brewed western style since that’s what I preferred.

1 tsp, 8oz, 175F, 1/1.5/2min

Dry leaf is yellowish-brown-green and smells like cashew, white sesame and whipped cream… I think. (Will I ever be able to train my nose and palate to green teas?) First and second steeps smelled really good and savory. They had the pungency of a nut butter, like tahini mixed with some cashew. The taste was similar with the addition of a light sweetness, marigold and edamame (Verdant noted both, I’m not sure I would’ve picked up on those otherwise) and an aftertaste of sweet cream. The liquor was kind of thick and creamy. Easy to drink quickly. Third steep thinned in aroma and mouthfeel and tasted like freshly fallen autumn leaves and marigold.

I’d say this autumn harvest is worth a try. FWIW, the partner in crime is willing to sell somebody else’s belongings to acquire more.

Preparation
175 °F / 79 °C 1 tsp 8 OZ / 236 ML

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Always open to gifting or swapping teas. I do send international when feasible. Please follow and send a message if you see a tea in my notes or cupboard that piques your interest.

Tea became a hobby and my daily drink of choice some time late in the last decade. My introduction to loose leaf came in the form of dumpster-dived Wuyi oolong packets that somebody left upon moving out of an apartment building. From there, my palate expanded to teas from across China and the world. I used to focus more on taste and still harbor the habit, but after trying sheng puer, I tend to focus more on how a tea feels in my body. Does it complement my constitution? Does it change my mood or does it enhance my current mindstate? Flavored teas are not a favorite but I do drink them intermittently.

In terms of who I am, you could consider me a jill of all trades. Specialty is not my strength, as can be seen in the spread of my tea notes. I might have attention issues. One thing I will always love is riding a bicycle.

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Sonoma County, California, USA

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