Wang Family Tea

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Recent Tasting Notes

90

Finished this one up a couple of months ago. Another very nice Wang family tea that offers a lot of florals that shift and evolve from steep to steep.

The rolled tea leaves are gigantic and dark green in color, emitting an aroma of apple and flowers. Following a rinse, coconut and tropical fruit emerge. The tea begins with creamsicle, flowers, and mineral accents. Lily of the valley and daffodils bloom in the second infusion. This is followed by more floral notes of gardenia, perfume, and a little honey. It begins fading after the 5th infusion but still offers a pleasant syrupy flavor.

I also prepared this by combining / stacking the infusions together. The result was a sweet and rich floral bouquet. Not as thick though and lacks some of the top notes. Nevertheless still full flavored and tasty.

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92

Backlog.

This was the second tea from my Wang Family Tea order. A few months ago when I was knee deep in studying, my tea consumption went way up despite having less time for leisurely gongfu sessions. Most of the time, I just wanted to be able to quickly fill up a mug or tumbler. So I resorted to compounding all of my gongfu infusions into one mug. And to my surprise, infusions often tasted better when combined than on their own. Such was the case with this tea. It expressed itself differently depending on how it was steeped yet was delicious no matter what.

I brewed it grandpa style the first time. Upon opening the bag, the tea leaves smelled of buttered flowers. First sip tasted like crisp, clean spring water with a lily floating in it. Reminiscent of baozhong with its lilac and light floral notes but absent the usual body and minerals of gaoshan. Refreshing flavor with a little fruitiness in the finish. After topping off, it had a more body along with sugarcane and vanilla notes.

Next session was normal gongfu where I tasted each steep individually. The leaves, which had been allowed to rest for a couple of days, now emitted a soft tropical aroma. A heady burst of orange blossom, coconut, and mango following a rinse. The flavor of the tea was sweet, juicy, and mineral rich. Full bodied with a bright, minty herbaceous note, and lingering florals.

The best result though came from combining all of the steeps. Using my 65ml mini kyusu, I stacked 4 steeps at a time and was shocked at how intensely fruity it tasted. It felt like a tropical cocktail in tea form. Fresh pineapple juice accented with with lychee and melon. Some top notes disappeared by the time I got to the later infusions but it was very fruity and delicious.

ashmanra

I will not buy more tea I will not buy more tea I will not buy more tea

ashmanra

I might buy some Wang Family Tea but I will blame it on Steepster

LuckyMe

@ashmanra lol we’re all enablers on this site :D

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88
drank Gangkou Oolong by Wang Family Tea
595 tasting notes

After seeing all of the rave reviews for Wang Family Tea on this site, I finally pulled the trigger and placed an order last November. Picked up 25g each of Gangkou, Lishan, Shan Lin Xi, and Long Feng Xia. I’m happy to report that all of them were outstanding and having experienced these teas, I get the hype for this vendor now.

Gangkou is the first tea I tried and the sole low elevation tea of the bunch. Wang Tea’s website describes it as having five flavors: sour, sweet, salty, bitter, and spicy. Indeed, this was the wildest one of the bunch as the flavors are all over the place. The website recommends a high leaf to water ratio and “heavily boiling water“ to steep. Despite my better judgement I followed their steeping parameters initially.

The dry leaf had aromas of flowers and freshly baked cookies. A rinse brought out cucumber and a little incense. The tea starts off with some strong vegetal notes and slight bitterness but eventually this fades and fruitier apricot and pear notes emerge. The bitterness wasn’t as bad as I feared but I decided to revert to my usual steeping method and kept the temperature below boiling which produced better results. Lowering the temperature and leaf quantity brought out gentle floral notes of jasmine, honeysuckle, and orchid intermingled with some sugar plum fruitiness. Along the way, there were hints of autumn leaves, toffee, spice, and perfume. When steeped grandpa style, it has a richer mouthfeel, mineral notes, and a sweet, lingering wildflower honey flavor.

Overall, this was a complex and enjoyable tea although a bit challenging at times due to how unpredictable and inconsistent it is.

Daylon R Thomas

How was the Long Feng? I’ve been meaning to get it, but I always pay too much for all their other goodies. I got a bunch of the green Shan Lin Xi Shui Xian (Chefs Kiss) and Jasmine Shan Lin Xi. Their roasts are also incredible too, though I usually move away from roasted teas.

LuckyMe

I’m currently drinking the Long Feng Xia. It’s quite good, tropical-floral flavor but less in your face than other gaoshans. I’m enjoying it more than some of the LFXs I’ve had from TTC.

Haven’t tried their roasts yet but plan to next time. I really want to order from them again this spring but unfortunately they don’t have baozhong which is one of my must-haves. I may end up splitting an order between Wang Tea and maybe Floating Leaves for the Baozhong.

Daylon R Thomas

I’m having the same kind of issue for the splits I’m looking for. I am desperate for some Lishan Black and tried Green Terrace, but they’re paypal isn’t accepting mine for some reason. No idea why. I’m also interested in some of Wang’s Shan Lin Xi White Tea. They don’t always sell it, but they’ve been really kind to give me some, and now Liquid Proust sells it. Leafhopper has talked a lot about Ethan Kurland on a tea forum that you buy directly from vendors and farmers. I haven’t done that yet, but I know he has some good Baozhong. Trident’s Baozhong is also insanely good.

LuckyMe

Green Terrace seems to bd all but closed. Their online inventory hasn’t been updated in a while. I know What-Cha has Lishan black but they’re sold out of it including a lot of other teas I want. Thanks for the tip about Trident, will check them out.

Daylon R Thomas

The Lishan Black was a limited summer crop sold later in that year, and there’s no 100% guarantee it will immediately return. I’ve been hoarding it while I can. Their Long Feng and Shan Lin XI are also good, along with their Darjeeling selection.

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98

Even just saying the name Alishan gets one excited. But then I opened the bag… Generally, when you have an absorber in there you don’t get much aroma but this one jumped up and popped me a good one. Floral with wet mineral accents. Big smile The wet liquor reminds me of being in a jungle and coming across a fresh bubbling brook loaded with flowers around the edges. Gardenias and orchids. Oh my. It is so soft on the tongue. The minerality increases the more steeps you progress into. Coconut. Fresh coconut milk. It isn’t strong but the mouthfeel and the taste are reminiscent of this. I love unraveling the wet leaf to see the beautiful pluck. A bud, one, two, three, and sometimes four leaves.

My four-year-old son is generally pretty good with knowing not to shake my arm while I’m drinking tea but this delectable brew and my keyboard were almost in big trouble when he grabbed my arm and hung from it. Good thing I’ve been working out.

The keyboard to my MS Surface is surprisingly durable. During a matcha workshop with Sooz of BeingTea.com I spilled at least a 1/2 cup of water all over the place. Half of which went into my keyboard. I unplugged and immediately tried to gently shake out what I could and then set it upside down in the sun. The first few days I thought for sure I’d need a new one. These things aren’t cheap T_T But now almost a week later it’s back to normal. Glad my son didn’t spill on it because that probably would have been the nail.

gmathis

Not that I am chuckling at your misfortune, but I love hearing other tea disaster and near-disaster stories simply because I’ve had so many of my own!

Skysamurai

Oh that gives me an idea! Gonna make a yea disaster story sharing thread!

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97

The Wang Family Tea company does not disappoint. Every one of their oolongs I have tried has been sublime. This one is another winner. Even at just 10 seconds you can immediately tell you are in for symphony of flavors. The beginning is mainly mineral flavors. Slightly sweet. As we let it steep longer the roast notes emerge along with some toast and some type of stone fruit I can’t identify. Steeped for too long and the heavy charcoal notes really take over. The first steeping was the best. The second I drank too quickly. The third has produced delicious roast notes with charcoal and slightly burnt wood but less of the sweetness found in the first steeping. The minerality remains but is a bit subdued by the charcoal notes. Now onto the fifth steeping. The water is color and the mixture of charcoal notes and minerality is fantastic.

Daylon R Thomas

I am going to buy from them as at least once a year. I’ve had other Wuyi style Taiwanese oolongs, but none of them were as balanced and flavorful as this one.

Skysamurai

Agreed Daylon! I definitely want to support them to keep them in business!

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96

Nothing like a good tea to blow everything else away. I was feeling annoyed. Okay, really annoyed. My FB profile was disabled. I posted something to sell in a garage sale group (marketplace and a few other groups) and for some reason, this group reported the post. After 30 days I received no review of the request I made and now I can’t get in…

Tightly rolled balls, with most still attached to the twigs. A darker shade, greenish brown. That first sip blew my mind. I should have written down more of what I was tasting but my mind kinda felt like it went blank. Superb. That clear, pale, golden liquor. That roasty, toasty, slightly butterscotchy, sweet, aroma. That flavor!! Good heavens. Each cup has produced different flavor profiles, one building on the next. Minerality and a smooth mouthfeel to begin. This third one is a bit more mineral with the light roast notes coming on stronger. The fourth cup is stronger on the roast notes. Charcoal. A bit of burnt toast. On the edges. Still edible. Slather it with butter. Dip it in your tea. Just kidding. Don’t do that. Especially not a tea like this one. A bit of burnt popcorn too. You used the popcorn button, didn’t you? I actually always use that button and have only burnt it once. That was only one steeping! One gong fu of water!!

gmathis

Welcome to FB jail ;) I got locked out about a year ago on a technicality (it WAS me logging in; I told them twelve times it was ME; and then got mad and gave up when they demanded photo ID). Took a while, but I don’t miss it much now!

gmathis

(I’d rather talk to you people anyway ;)

Skysamurai

I originally got off because I gave it up for lent. I wanted to see if it really was affecting me or if it was something else going on and some of the …withdraw? lol I experienced was strange. I don’t mind not being on it but what really gets me is that I can’t at least get to my photos and videos _

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98

Tried it tumbler, it works really well but I have to shoot for 3-4, moreso 5 grams for 12-14 oz and 185-190 water. It is also exceptional cold brewed after about 4-6 hours in my tumbler, and exceptional western in my kyusu. Gong fu is the most bang for you buck for finding each individual flavor, though western has a full texture and body that greatly retains floral and fruity complexity. I’m so tempted to rate this as a hundred at this point. I crave this one and never get tired of it.

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98

March and April has consisted of impulse purchases of teas that I don’t need. Frustration, extended work hours, positive changes, and my motivating birthday were the catalysts.

I hovered over this one during the Chinese new year. I waited for my paycheck, and then it was sold out. Luckily, it was restocked on the site, and took a slight gamble getting 75 grams. I don’t regret it at all. Shanlinxi is among my top favorite terroirs, Wang has some of the best oolong I’ve had, and I am one of those basic tea drinkers that likes good jasmine.

I’ve mostly done it western and semi gong fu, but matching more the 50-60 second initial parameters. Shorter steeps makes this tea last longer in bursts of juicy fruit flavors and jasmine, but longer steeps round out the texture and complexity. I didn’t take detailed mental notes with it because I was head over feet. Dryleaf smell is alpine, sweet, grassy, peachy, and jasminey, and so was the tea. Jasmine dominates the most under a very refreshing body and thick mouthfeel, bordering on voluptuous. Flavor fades by steep four though, and some lustre is lost but texture stays.

This one hits every thing I like about oolong tea, and nearly gets an instant 94. I need to tumbler and properly gong fu before I settle my score.

Flavors: Apple, Floral, Fruity, Green, Jasmine, Juicy, Lychee, Peach, Pine, Sweet, Thick

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This is my three hundredth tasting note! Let’s hope there will be many more to come. Even without the swaps, Steepster is a great place to explore new teas and hone my tasting skills. I appreciate you guys!

When I ordered from Wang Family Tea last summer, I got every high mountain oolong except for Dayuling, which only came in a 50 g bag. Fortunately, Daylon remedied this situation with a generous sample. I steeped it according to the vendor’s instructions using 6 g in 120 ml of boiling water for 60, 50, 65, 90, 120, 160, and 240 seconds, plus 4, 5, and 10 minute steeps.

The dry aroma is of orchids, veggies, and sugarcane. The first steep has notes of fresh veggies, including lettuce and green beans, plus orchid, peach, cookie, and sugarcane. The sweet orchid aftertaste goes on for minutes. The second steep gives me even headier orchid, veggies (I get cabbage in this steep), white sugar, peach, and other flowers I can’t name. There’s a green, sappy, “plant-like” quality to this tea. The next steep is quite similar, with orchid, peach, plants, cabbage, green beans, and sugarcane sweetness. Daylon detects hyacinths, and that might be the flower I’m also getting. The aftertaste is almost as good as the tea itself. The peach has bowed out by the fourth steep, though the veggies, florals, and sweetness are still prominent. By the seventh steep, this tea is mostly grassy and vegetal, though there’s no hint of the astringency that plagues most green oolongs in their final steeps. This seems to be a characteristic of Wang’s teas.

This tea is elegant, elusive, and ethereal while still having lots of flavour. I don’t claim to taste misty mountain forests, but I understand where that’s coming from. This tea deserves careful attention, and I’m going to hold off on rating it until I do a couple more sessions.

Flavors: Cabbage, Cookie, Floral, Grass, Green, Green Beans, Lettuce, Orchid, Peach, Plants, Smooth, Sugar, Sugarcane, Sweet, Vegetal

Preparation
Boiling 1 min, 0 sec 6 g 4 OZ / 120 ML
Michelle

Congrats on your 300th note. Its about the tea journey, not the number of notes(so I tell myself as I don’t write one very often)

Martin Bednář

But the tea journey is wonderful one and swaps are fun!

Leafhopper

Thanks, Michelle! Indeed, it’s about the tea journey (I don’t write many notes either).

Martin, absolutely, swaps are fun, and you get to try all sorts of new teas! But even without them, Steepster is a good place. :)

derk

Congrats, always happy to see your notes and do swaps :)

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91

The initial scent rising as the water hits the leaf is amazing. Caramel, sweetness different roasted candies, woodsy. Oh. My. Word. So good. The dry aroma isn’t there because it was tightly packed with an aroma eater. This is okay though. The flavor is superb. Charcoal notes. Crystal clear and no astringency. The longer you let it steep the more charcoal comes out. Almost to the point of feeling like I stuck a lump of coal in my mouth minus the grittiness of how that would feel. But the sweetness that hits before it gets to that point is sublime. The wet aroma of the leaves is very unique! I feel like I know what it is but my mind can’t quite pinpoint it. Roasted nuts, maybe chestnut. And wet woods in summer.

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92

WARNING- LONG LONG LONG NOTE FOR AN OOLONG.

My stash is the 2020 lot, but it has the same notes as they used in their description for 2021. I actually ordered 50 grams of this last year but got 2 10 gram samples; I contacted the company and they sent me the 50 grams that I ordered.

Reviewing this one, it’s an extremely clean and thick high mountain oolong. It can handle high temperatures and it usually lasts at least 6 steeps for me when I brew it in the 20-30 sec increment scale, but I also follow the parameters on the website rinsing the tea, then going for 60, 50, 65, 90, and then long steeps ahead. The shorter steeps bring out more of the florals you smell in the aroma into the taste, but the longer steeps gong fu give you a more rounded mouthfeel. Boiling water amps up aroma, cooler temperatures make the tea a little bit sweeter in my experience.

The notes on this one are interesting because it really hits you more in feeling, while the tea is not lacking in flavor. It’s a lighter tea that I can see red tea drinkers snubbing, and it’s not as fruity as other Dayulings. While it’s definitely floral, the florals are harder to pin apart other than orchid, some hyacinth, and other more subtle white flowers. Snowdrops kept coming to my mind. It is definitely sweet having a white sugar note in the first two steeps, even in the rinse, and it’s got a refreshing vegetal creamy mouthfeel. The site describes the vegetal notes as being like mountain cabbage, and I can see it in the teas refreshing crisp quality. Sometimes it’s got a white egg quality in texture, and there were times where I get peach in steep 3, but not too often. Orchid, sugar, white flowers, and cabbage are the main notes I get.

Like most Dayuling’s it’s effervescent, and it feels like your drinking a mountain mist cloud in overlooking a forest kind of like the way the describe. Like a cuifeng, it’s got some alpine notes too which I usually don’t get. They were describing petrichor, but I am getting something like drinking dew and misty fog. This tea is the essence of moisture, and moisture is the essence of beauty……(mer-man high pitch pitiful coughing)
Comment if you know the movie reference!

So yes, this is leaf water, but it’s good leaf water that comes from mountains with water falls and mist. Basically, it’s what a Dayuling is supposed to be. I’ve only had one other Dayuling that I’ve liked a little bit more in terms of flavor, but I highly recommend this one mostly because I recommend Wang Family Tea period. Their customer service is awesome and none of their teas disappoint me. If you are looking more for something flavor forward and fruity, then the Fushou Shan might be a better bet or one of the specialty Shanlinxi’s. The cuifeng is also exceptional if you are looking for something cheaper but just as good.

I’m just glad that I finally got to reviewing this one. I know a few of you are probably tired of the constant high mountain oolongs I review. They are becoming a specialty at this point. Leafhopper, if you want me to save some of this for you, I will. Just let me know.

Flavors: Butter, Creamy, Floral, Lettuce, Orchid, Peach, Rainforest, Smooth, Sugar, Sugarcane, Sweet, Vegetal

Preparation
205 °F / 96 °C 1 min, 0 sec 5 g 5 OZ / 147 ML
derk

I’m not tired of your reviews! You stop with that nonsense.

Mastress Alita

I would NEVER miss a Zoolander reference. I’ve had that whole movie memorized for years!

tea-sipper

Not tired of them either!

Leafhopper

Keep those high mountain oolong reviews coming! I have a bit of the Foushoushan but none of the Dayuling, so I’d be delighted if you could keep some for me. We could do another swap in the fall when my stash is a bit more manageable.

Daylon R Thomas

Sounds good!

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Daylon kindly sent me this Dong Fang Mei Ren as an introduction to Wang Family Tea. I had a session with it early in June, and just finished the sample a couple days ago. Following the vendor’s instructions, I steeped 5 g of leaf in a 120 ml teapot using boiling water for 20, 20, 20, 30, 40, 50, 60, 90, 120, and 240 seconds, plus several long brews at the end of the session.

In my first session, the dry aroma was of honey, autumn leaves, apricot, citrus, and flowers. The first steep had notes of honey, candied orange, autumn leaves, wood, and flowers, with an aftertaste of honey that lasted for several minutes. There was a touch of not unpleasant astringency. The second steep added a sappy note, which the vendor describes as hinoki cypress (yes, I had to look that up), but it was mostly about the honey and florals. This was one of the sweetest bug-bitten teas I’ve ever had. The third and fourth steeps had more citrus, sap, osmanthus, orange blossom, butter, and lots and lots of honey. I stopped taking notes here for some reason.

I used more leaf in the next session to finish the sample, which might have been a mistake. As well as the honey, apricot, citrus, and florals I experienced in the previous session, I got wood, Graham cracker, lemon, and tannins. Unfortunately, a thunderstorm came along and I had to turn off my computer for a while, so the notes for this session are spotty as well. I got lots of honey, flowers, sap, and apricot, but the tannins, wood, and autumn leaves never went away and got stronger as the session progressed.

I wish I’d taken more care with this tea and kept better notes. This is a quality Dong Fang Mei Ren with lots of apricots and honey, though it’s a little too sweet for me. It also requires careful steeping.

Flavors: Apricot, Astringent, Autumn Leaf Pile, Butter, Citrus, Floral, Graham Cracker, Honey, Lemon, Orange, Orange Blossom, Osmanthus, Sap, Sweet, Tannic, Wood

Preparation
Boiling 5 g 4 OZ / 120 ML

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95

I’m amping up the rating because I keep on coming back to it. It was fruitier today, maybe due to the Michigan humidity, but it was the perfect balance between lilac, hyacinth, chlorophyll, green apple, grass, and creamy green coconut water notes. I even grandpa’d the remainder on steep 8 in a cup, and it evolved from creamy, green, lemongrass, osmanthus to melon and snappeas. Soo soothing and clean. I know the notes aren’t that different from any Alishan, and it’s not quite as peachy as some higher grade stuff I’ve had, but this one strikes the right balance of vegetal/grassy with other profiles that makes it stand out, like it’s exceptional aftertaste.

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95

I’ve had this one for a while, and I yet again thought I already wrote about it.

I’ve actually had both the 2019 and 2020 versions of of this tea, but I don’t know which one I’ve just opened. I am dumb.

Anyway, this was an extremely easy going Alishan that I drank in under a week the first time I had it, and I see myself finishing it quickly again. The light roast version of it is fruitier, but this one is extremely refreshing. I’ve found that Alishans are either really vegetal, or very fruity, but always floral and creamy in texture. I usually prefer the other mountains, yet if the Alishan is on the fruitier end, I will go for it.

This is one of the first teas in the middle of fruity and vegetal for my palette, leaning more on floral and green. I get some lemongrass and coconut on occasion, but I mostly get subdued fresia in the florals, some very light magnolia, under a heavy and heady orchid flavor/aroma. Either way it’s sweet. I actually brewed this unlike how I typically do it. I didn’t rinse it, and brewed it close to a minute, and then shortened the steeps 10-15 sec each time until I got to a good 27 sec steep four and five, and then I amped the tea back up to a minute, 2 minutes, and so on….and it kept on going and the huigan kept on giving, becoming lighter like lettuce.

I’ll just quote the company for the notes:

“Dry tea leaves are bright green, and smell of chlorophyll. First round of brewing brings out a strong floral flavor and fragrance. The tea liquor is a beautiful amber color. This tea is already starting to impart a long lingering aftertaste; the flavor starts floral, and moves to the deeper taste of orchids. The second of brewing imparts an additional woodsiness of mountain forests. Think freshly sprung bamboo shoots and old growth pine trees. The florality of the first round grows sweeter. This sweetness makes the tea liquor seem almost thick in the mouth. The fragrance of the second round is sweet, woodsy, and has an undercurrent of grass to it. The third round enhances all the notes of this tea. The woodsiness, florality, and taste of orchids are especially pronounced here. The aftertaste is very sweet, and lasts for many, many minutes.”

I’m not sure about the woodsiness, but it’s not a dry wood by any means. I know I’m using “ocean air” in my notes, but it’s got the feel of the heights in tropical mountains that is almost hydrating to inhale. I usually rate Alishans that are fruitier higher; however, the feels and fresh quality this tea gives me is making me put it above just the 90’s number I hover around.

It’s got a little bit of pine compared to most Alishans, and it’s got this really refreshing morning dew/mountain air quality that’s super easy to drink. It’s not the most flavor forward Alishan I’ve had, but it’s one of the most easy going ones that has enough complexity to make me think about it. The tea has enough sweet florals to balance out the grassy notes. Wang Family tea tend to specialize in the Shan Lin Xi’s, but this one is very well balanced and surprisingly fast and easy for me to down.

Flavors: Coconut, Cream, Creamy, Floral, Freshly Cut Grass, Fruit Tree Flowers, Green, Green Wood, Lemongrass, Ocean Air, Orchid, Osmanthus, Rainforest, Spinach, Spring Water, Sweet

Preparation
195 °F / 90 °C 1 min, 0 sec 5 g 5 OZ / 147 ML
Leafhopper

Sounds like a tasty tea, and I’m glad I picked some up in my order. :)

Daylon R Thomas

You did?! I am so excited to see what you think!

Leafhopper

Yeah, I picked up basically all the high mountain oolongs, including the Li Shan, Cui Feng, Shan Lin Xi, and Chi Lai Shan. I even got a 10 g sample of the Fushoushan. However, I tried to save a little money by buying the High Mountain Experience set, which I thought contained 2021 oolongs but may in fact contain oolongs from 2020. I guess that means I’ll have to get to them quickly!

Leafhopper

I just heard back from the vendor and it looks like the oolongs in the experience set are from 2021. Good news!

Daylon R Thomas

Yay! And all of those are really good.

Leafhopper

Glad to hear it! :)

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93

I just got a big order from Wang Family Tea, and I couldn’t be more excited! This was one of the teas I was most looking forward to trying. I steeped 6 g of leaf in a 120 ml teapot in boiling water for the recommended 55, 45, and 55 seconds, then had to guess about subsequent brews because the vendor doesn’t provide any instructions. I chose to steep it for 1:15, 1:30, 2, 3, and 5 minutes.

The dry aroma of these big tea nuggets is of orchids, brown sugar, and stonefruit. The first steep is surprisingly sweet, with orchid, brown sugar, butter, other florals, lettuce, and lots of peach. I still don’t really know what osmanthus tastes like and haven’t knowingly had mung bean paste, though I have had red bean buns, which may or may not be relevant. The second steep has more orchid, butter, grass, that other flower that I suspect is osmanthus, beans, and lots and lots of peach, especially in the back of the throat and in the aftertaste. The next couple steeps have a little less stonefruit and more florals and beans, but are still very smooth. I also get a hint of sap that is typical of Shan Lin Xi. The sappy character continues in the next two rounds, along with peach, beans, orchids, osmanthus, and grass. Near the end of the session, the stonefruit and florals fade and I get grass, beans, and spinach.

As Daylon states, this oolong isn’t complicated, but the flavours come through beautifully and there’s virtually no bitterness. I value these things highly in green oolongs and my rating reflects that.

Flavors: Beany, Brown Sugar, Butter, Floral, Grass, Lettuce, Orchid, Osmanthus, Peach, Sap, Smooth, Spinach, Vegetal

Preparation
Boiling 6 g 4 OZ / 120 ML
LuckyMe

I’ve heard a lot of good things about Wang Family Tea. Gotta give them a try soon.

Daylon R Thomas

You’d like the High Mountain sampler if it’s available. I was really satisfied with all of them, and even the niche specialty ones are extremely good. I’ve been aching for their Shui Xian Shan lin Xi.

Leafhopper

You should definitely check them out! They have great service and I’ve enjoyed the teas I’ve tried from them so far.

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89

Quick note.

I got this at the beginning of the year as a birthday present. Brewing 5 grams up in 5 oz vessel Gong Fu, I started out with a rinse of 15 sec, then brewed it 3 oz at 20 sec, then 5 oz at 25, 30, 25, 45, 55, 75, and onto losing cout going into minutes.

The rinse had an interesting hibiscus cream note that was really nice, and lots coming from the aroma. The tea’s texture is very soft with a very clean profile. The first brew was floral, creamy, vegetal, and smooth reminding me of lilies and peach skins. 3rd and 4th brews had more fruitiness, with a little bit of pineapple among hyacinth, and oddly enough, hibiscus in an extremely green body. Thick and viscous, but soft. The mung bean vegetal taste was fairly prominent, but complimented the floral and fruity notes in a fresh mix, occasionally giving off a vanilla-orchid note. The later notes are a little stemmy or spriggy, but not really woodsy. If it is woodsy, it’s kind of like fresh bamboo.

Overall, a really pleasing Lishan I’m glad I got to try. It’s very fresh and forgiving….and long lasting. There are others from Wang Family Tea that I liked a little bit more than this one, especially in terms of their Shanlinxi’s, but the huigan is incredible. This is the kind of tea I’m going to take my time with. There were elements of this that made me think of a Dayuling, especially with some of the rose notes I got midway through, but it was overall thicker.

Rating is between 85-95. It’s high quality for sure that leans more in the 90’s. Price is the main thing keeping me from rating it higher, though this tea might grow on me like it’s long lasting after taste.

Flavors: Beany, Creamy, Floral, Fruit Tree Flowers, Fruity, Green, Green Wood, Hibiscus, Peach, Pineapple, Rose, Sugar, Sweet, Thick, Vanilla, Vegetal

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95

I was pouring tea for a couple of friends (outside! Socially distanced!) and this was a very lovely tea for a lovely Oregon spring day. The first infusion was extremely buttery and a very sweet and smooth finish. The second infusion, grassy notes mingled with the butter. But the third was a revelation, the grass was overshadowed by heavy floral notes that appeared. One of my friends thought I’d switched out for a jasmine tea! Really lovely, will drink again.

Flavors: Butter, Floral, Grass

Preparation
Boiling 1 min, 0 sec 20 g 1000 OZ / 29573 ML

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97

Love this tea, and one that I thought I added and wrote about on Steepster, but alas, no.

I am working with the same year, 2019, and it’s one of my favorites. It’s got all the notes I associate with Shan Lin Xi-coconut, pineapple, pineapple skin, fresh greens, creamy texture, lingering after taste, and floral aroma that’s so lush and soft that it’s akin to a fabric softener sheet. It’s a little bit more vegetal than some other Shan Lin Xi’s I’ve had, but it’s definitely sweeter and more floral. It’s got enough complexity to boot gong fu going from floral, green, woodsy (slightly), dew, mountain air, jasmine, hyacinth, fruity, to honey and more floral mid steeps, and then sweeter, and it’s well rounded western or even as tumbler grandpa fuel if you are light on the leaves. I got asian pear in steep three yesterday, and it made my easter morning.

What I like about this particular Shanlinxi of the many I’ve had is that it’s incredibly forgiving and has a great energy. The L-theanine-caffeine combo is great and gets me through my mornings. It’s also got decent longevity going up to ten or twelve brews if you really leaf it and flash steep it, but it’s better to have a medium approach and medium to longer brewing time. It’s rarely astringent or too green.

The only downside is price. It costs $10 American Dollars for 25 grams, and though the price is lower as you go up to $28 for 75 grams, it’s still an investment for a tea that is worth the amount, but something that will hurt the pocket if it’s drank daily. Although it’s been my regular ShanLinXi for the last year and a half, it’s mixed in with the other assortment of teas I spend too much money on just to try. I do want to at least keep 25 grams of it around at a time because I like it that much.

Flavors: Coconut, Creamy, Floral, Freshly Cut Grass, Fruit Tree Flowers, Green, Green Beans, Honey, Jasmine, Pear, Pine, Pineapple, Tropical

Leafhopper

LOL, some Shan Lin Xis indeed remind me of fabric softener due to their combo of heavy florals and vanilla. Also, based on my experience, US$10 per ounce is fairly normal for Shan Lin Xi. The one from Camellia Sinensis is slightly less, given the exchange rate, at about CAD$11 per ounce. The offerings from Floating Leaves and Tillerman are maybe a few dollars more. Let me know if you can find a good SLX for less. My wallet would be grateful!

Daylon R Thomas

You know I will. Actually, me and Liquidproust were on a quest for one four years ago. We didn’t find anything perfect, but a lot of what we got was from farmers, ebay, etc. I used to get Lishan from Berylleb King Tea along with Dayuling that was cheaper than some others. I would recommend that company if it weren’t for the change in name. The $6 new customer discount at Wang Family tea also made a huge difference.

Daylon R Thomas

The most affordable Shanlinxi staple we found at the time was Beautiful Taiwan Tea’s Misty Mountain. I’m not sure what the Canadian Rates are or the current price. I stopped buying from them because there was a season that I did not like, and then I took a break from them and explored other companies.

Daylon R Thomas

Their traditional Dong Ding is very good and peachy.

Leafhopper

Daylon, sorry, I just saw your comments. I might order from BTTC in the future. I had a Jin Xuan from them that was nice. Your Shan Lin Xi quest sounds fun.

If it weren’t for their hefty shipping charges, I’d give Wang Family Tea a try, and I might do it anyway because their teas sound so good. However, I’ll wait till the spring teas come out and I have fewer oolongs in my stash!

Daylon R Thomas

Good idea. I’m curious to see what the spring is like this year, too.

Leafhopper

Apparently there’s a drought in Taiwan, which could reduce the amount of tea produced by 30 to 50 percent. I’m not sure if it would affect the quality. Fingers crossed!

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94

I’m having a hard time uploading the pictures. Anyway, this was another favorite that I did not write about for some reason last year…before last year. Spring 2019. I’ve mentally combined 2020 and 2021. Man is that nuts. Almost two years ago. It was an early sipdown, and therefore…this is an old backlog. I wish I wrote something down because I remembered tasting all kinds of changes in the finish in each session.

I followed the guidelines of 55, 45, 55, and longer and longer, along with other sessions with less water, shorter times of 30 sec, and grandpa sessions. Green bean is pretty good for this one, but it bears a lot of similarities to Lishan and Cuifeng, especially in the alpine mountain air category. Sometimes, it reminded me of dew. I remember the 2019 season being fresh, and in the category of vegetal done right. The mental justifications of this tea being more than vegetal were lemon verbana and lime in hints. Sometimes, I got more marine qualities and pineapple, though vaguely. I’m not sure how accurate that is, but it’s the impression I remember on top of the sweet finish and the refreshing clean quality of the tea. Only thing is it’s a little pricey, so I save for the other hard hitters Wang Family Tea has as I go through “I must try all the teas before I go back to civilization” Covid phase.

Random reflection: I’m extremely contradictory on vegetal teas and whether I like vegetal notes like Goldilocks. I’ve used the same notes for teas that I’ve been bored with, nevermind I was enthralled by this one. It was super well balanced, and I think the experience was enhanced by the fact it was the beginning of a better school year than my first year teaching.

And on the back to civilization blurb, I study civilization for a living as a social studies teacher, but I really don’t like interacting with living civilization…so the dead keep good company…man I made that dark. I think that’s a sign I need to drink some lighter tea. Onto some white tea! (Or lie and just go to a bit lighter oolong ‘cause I’m basic and need a hint of darkness in my tea.)

Flavors: Floral, Freshly Cut Grass, Green, Green Apple, Green Beans, Lemon, Lemongrass, Marine, Pine, Pineapple, Sweet

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95

One of my favorite of the medium light roasted oolongs from Wang Tea, and a Tea I swore that I wrote about in some form on here last year. Who knows; I might be going a full Quixote in writing the notes in my head thinking I wrote them on here. It’s more hilarious and I already know it’s true, but tragic as it is farcical.

Enough self-absorption-onto the tea that I wish I could remember in greater clarity. So relying on the notes provided, this is a fairly complex and decadent tea. The roast coaxes out savory-sweeter notes of roasted nuts, honey, and cream, changing from nutty in earlier steeps to cream in the later ones. I personally remember something vaguely peachy in steep for, but I know like other nutty Gaoshan macademia and almond appeared. The was not too floral in earlier steeps, but I remember violet in steep five, and then fading out into creamy nuttiness. It’s also a tea that I probably used almond for in description, but I also remember the tea getting sweeter as I went on. I almost got more of it in my last order, yet I decided to prioritize newer teas to expand my horizons and luxuriate in some newer developments.

I know for sure that I am regretting not buying more of this one because it was very similar to the Phoenix Village Oolong that was in Eco-Cha’s club as it comes from the same village. This tea was less vegetal and more nutty, but not quite as fruity. This one is still one of my favorites from Wang Family Tea and really hits my spots for being easy going and complex at the same time.

Flavors: Almond, Cream, Creamy, Floral, Honey, Nuts, Peach, Roasted, Smooth, Sweet, Violet

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Got this at the same time as the Wild Garden Shan Lin Xi.

This is a backlog, though in real time, I’m thinking about brewing some up. I actually had more mixed feelings about this one.

The notes are vivid, and like most of the teas I buy, it’s of the aromatic variety. Pears, magnolia, heavy honey, chrysanthemum, wood, sticks…it’s all there. The tea is so honey note heavy and sweet that it has some similarities to red oolongs and the Dong Feng Mei Ren that the company described. It bordered on malty, kinda like buckwheat honey. Tasty, and viscous, but heavy, even for me.

I’ve personally found that I go through moods with the honeyed styled teas, especially Dong Feng Mei Ren. I have to be in the mood for woodsy. I felt like I was sucking honey on a stick in spring with this one.

With all that said, it’s very good and highly recommend it to anyone, but I personally needed to lighten up to quicker medium 20-30 sec steeps gong fu. Western was a little too heavy and gave me a little more issues. I wish I added this one to Leafhoppers package. Darn.

I’m still figuring this one out. I like it and think it’s high quality, but I’m not sure who I’d recommend it to. It is pretty steep with the price. For now, it’s an enjoyed and new experience. I currently enjoy the wild garden version a lot more, but this one is good, and I still highly recommend Wang Family Tea.

Flavors: Floral, Flowers, Fruity, Honey, Malt, Mango, Pear, Sweet, Wet Wood

Leafhopper

LOL, I kind of wish you’d added it to my package, too! (Thanks for including their Dong Fang Mei Ren.) I was drooling over their Shan Lin Xi oolongs a while ago, but their shipping to Canada is steep, especially for a company located in Taiwan.

Daylon R Thomas

Their Shan Lin Xi is one of my top favorites right now. It’s becoming a go to morning tea before I run out of it.

Leafhopper

Maybe I’ll have to make my yearly splurge order for spring high mountain oolongs with this company. Have any Canadians ordered from them? If I remember rightly, their shipping is $20 to Canada and $8 to the U.S.

Leafhopper

Yeah, that’s what I thought. I might try contacting them to see if they can provide a lower rate by shipping from their Taiwanese warehouse, as they might be calculating the cost to ship from their U.S. store.

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98

Bumpin’ up the rating as I sip this down because it is hands down one of the best Shanlinxi’s and experimental teas I’ve had.

There were more notes with the fruity notes I wrote earlier, but more floral notes and vanilla. Sugar also came up, surprisingly yesterday, along with orchid, peaches, and dessert.

There were more vegetal notes like Swiss chard, lots of orchids and green notes, and green sugar cane. It is more vegetal today, than yesterday with hotter weather and more leaf, but still extremely refreshing and tasty.

To my surprise, this was actually a winter 2020….and it is one of the most unique teas I’ve had. I cannot recommend this one enough for those who want to splurge because it’s special.

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98

I’m having a hard time uploading pictures…oh well.

I’ve had a few teas, and I will say the last two weeks have been tough. We’re back on lockdown…again…in the two weeks after we went fully in person. 1/2 of our students had to self quarantine and then less showed up. A lot of them are afraid, tired, drained, lost, and feeling like their in a weird place. Others are trying to push forward and keep up the good pace they’ve been on. I won’t go into much more detail than that, but I needed a recharge this weekend before I go into work. Specifically, work tonight and for tomorrow morning. So I drank some of this tea today, and I’m beginning with a little mental success of completing my little expo over something I enjoy.

I decided to splurge on this and another sample since I had some saved up. It was $12 for 25 grams, and was not quite sure what to expect. The description is unusually short on the website, but vivid, focusing on the orchid profile, sweetness, and “distinct” fruitiness, implicating buddha fruit and passion fruit.

Going back to the tea, I would say tasting it blind, I’d think it was a Li Shan with how intensely fruity and aromatic it is. The orchids were prominent and the tea was sweet dry and wet; yet, the fruits pick up intensely in the second brew gong fu and the first steep western. Melon, gardenia and lightly cooked peaches personally came to mind, and it was extremely lush. I know I’ve used those notes for other High Mountain oolong teas, but it was dense and yielding. I got seven solid steeps in the gong fu, each fruity until steep eight. I did the 30 second measurement for that one, and about 5 grams for 5 oz. I could have gone heavier, but the aroma was perfect.

I can see the Buddha Fruit citrine comparison-it’s soft, sweet, vaguely citrusy, but not totally there. The passionfruit is a lot more dominant in steep 3-4 gong fu, and as it cools western.

I think that if I hadn’t have ShuiXian before, I think I might have mistaken this for a high end gaoshan. Again, not a bad thing at all-it’s more of a compliment piled on top of a compliment, but I personally got a deeper appreciation for it knowing what it is. I’ve had some varietals from localities that don’t always work for me, but this one worked well for me because it was flavor forward. I could taste a lot of similarities to the Zhangping pillows version of the Shui Xian in terms of the florals, especially the gardenia note I would get, but the heavy fruit notes, especially the peach, reminded me of the later steeps of the Wu Yi rock version. The light roast could be pushing forward the sweetness along with an oxidation of at least 25 or30% by my guess, but still.

Overall, I’m deeply impressed with this one. I would be on the border of splurging more on this one, but I recommend this for people who want to treat themselves for special occasion. My special occasion was the need for extravagant coping and sensory grounding, but I do think that this tea is approachable for new comers to oolong, but it’s price point is more for the experienced drinkers who are tea nerding.

It’s good for western or Gong Fu, but I personally prefer it gong fu…nevermind it was frickin awesome tumbler fuel with an extremely light amount of leaves. I’m probably going to add more to this in the future because I think it’s got more to offer.

Flavors: Floral, Fruity, Melon, Orchid, Passion Fruit, Peach, Savory, Sweet

Leafhopper

Wow! If I ever order from these guys, this tea will be in my cart.

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92

I wish this site would actually save my notes….

Okay, I need to let out some tea verbiage confetti. Before I do that, I will say that the majority of the teas that I’ve drank so far and have mentioned are not on steepster yet, so it will take some time for me to put them up. I missed it when companies used to put the teas on here themselves. Oh well.

Moving onto this one, Wang Family teas never dissapoint. Oolongs dominate their catalogue, but they are all different, but they are all smooth and easy to drink. Gaoshan’s are usually smooth by default, but Wang’s teas smoothen out the rougher edges of their teas, whether that edge is the nuclear spinach quality of most high mountain green oolongs, or the smooth out their roasting edge by relying on charcoal, or at least roasting the tea to caramelize the sugars evenly in their tea.

The Dragon Boat Festival brought up a few new finds on their website that I had to try. I was already scouting out their Oriental Beauty, and thinking about getting more of their Shan Lin Xi because it works as a good morning tea, but then they had to add a few more interesting additions, including this fine tea.

It’s a wild grown one, so I expected some heavy florals, maybe fruitier qualities. The companies description is vivid, breaking it down session by session after the rinse and the 55, 45, 55 second pattern. They describe sweet orchid coating the tea’s flavor, and then detail osmanthus and mung bean in the middle steeps. They found stonefruit and brown sugar in the aroma of the later steeps.

I personally got it in reverse order, and used around 5-6 grams instead of 7. The dry leaf is extremely sweet, having some stonefruit and brown sugar qualities with the already in the dry leaf. I also got more of those notes in steep one after the rinse rather than the third ones. Orchid, followed by osmanthus were obvious. Mung bean and orchid described the rest of it. It was not as vegetal as other Shan Lin Xi’s I’ve had, which is nice given how sweet it is. I also find that it did not evolve to much in the later brews up to brew 7, but they were balanced, sweet and refreshing.

I really enjoyed this one, and the leaves were huge. Even the dryleaf looked like oversized dragonheads. My only nitpick is the price, since it was $16 per 25 grams. I usually expect a little bit more complexity with that price point. It’s a quality tea for sure with a sweetness that stands out against other Shan Lin Xi, but it still has the flavors you can usually expect from this quality tea. I don’t regret buying it for a minute, and I recommend Gaoshan devotees to try it, but I can also see more people being picky about the lack of complexity.

I’d like to see if someone has a similar reaction, though I have a feeling I’d rate it on the higher end than some people just because of my preference for easy going teas. I’m tossed up between 87-92 for the rating.

Flavors: Beany, Brown Sugar, Floral, Orchid, Osmanthus, Stonefruit, Sweet

Preparation
200 °F / 93 °C 0 min, 45 sec
White Antlers

Ah! Nice to see a new review, especially one of yours.

LuckyMe

Your tasting notes are winning me over. Gotta give this new tea shop a try!

Daylon R Thomas

Wang Family tea is great. Most of their teas tend to need longer steep times, but they are durable. They have some unique selections though. They usually have a good spectrum of roasts too. Their Wuyi won me over and I’m usually not a huge fan of the Wuyi Taiwanese teas.

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