Chawangshop

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Recent Tasting Notes

Finally getting around to the Chawangshop teas I purchased maybe 3 years ago.

An exploration of Mengsong pu’er. The Mengsong here is blended with Jingmai material.

I’ve been nursing this over the course of the day since past experience with Jingmai teas has often left me feeling spun. It’s been forceful yet kind.

The tea makes its first impression with a cooling eucalyptus overlay. Stonefruit and citrus tones. Deep, and buttery-cooked-plum sweet. The sweetness is moderate, not as rich as Yiwu teas can be. Underlying astringency becomes more pronounced but never out of control. Initially, it lacks bitterness but it develops at an adequate pace. Like the astringency, never out of control.

Maybe this tea gets its punch and strength from Mengsong, but the flavor profile reminds me more of Jingmai. The aroma is developing and the liquor is pouring a brownish-orange color. The dry leaf is darkening. It seems like it was pressed medium-tight but water loss has made peeling layers off an easy task. This is a solid tea. Nothing amazing but for where it is in its age, it’s doing mighty fine :)

Flavors: Astringent, Bitter, Butter, Citrus, Eucalyptus, Fruity, Peat Moss, Plum, Smoke, Stonefruit

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76

When dry, this tea’s aroma reminds me of juniper berries and fireplace. After the rinse, it is musty and earthy with a touch of oak. The liquor has a buttery and bubbly texture and a sweet & savoury profile with strong minerality and grape flavour.

Flavors: Berries, Earth, Fireplace, Grapes, Mineral, Musty, Oak, Sweet, Whiskey

Preparation
Boiling 0 min, 15 sec 8 g 5 OZ / 140 ML

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70

I’ve not had a wide variety of these Hubei Green Brick teas. Having drunk through two bricks of others and a brick and a half of this, I think I have a general grasp of the category’s outlines. All of these I’ve had share some common characteristics: Rougher/chopped leaves, heavy mineral sweetness, and dried fruit and woody flavors.

This one in particular takes a bit to open up as the compression seems to be higher than others I’ve tried. It starts out as a dried fruit bomb with lots of dark sweet aromas. The next thing I notice is a raisin-y-toffee-wood flavor that will be with the tea for the rest of the session. Once it really opens up it is pretty consistent steep-to-steep.

Low/no bitterness or astringency. Nothing of note with the texture. This is the most interesting green brick I’ve tried. While it i doesn’t really blow me away, it is always a safe and reliable tea to reach for. Really easy drinking stuff. If you’ve been run off by cheaper, bland, super chopped up, Hubei heicha in the past and are looking to give the catagory another chance, this seems to be a good option.

Flavors: Caramel, Raisins, Red Fruits, Tobacco, Toffee, Wet Rocks, Wood

Preparation
Boiling 5 tsp 100 OZ / 2957 ML

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100

This is probably a sacrilege but I blended it with below

https://steepster.com/teas/yunnan-sourcing/79472-2013-three-cranes-35035-liu-bao-tea-from-guangxi

Anytime I had this type of heicha, it brings me back to Malawian satemwa white. I could definitely recommend it to someone who is making brave steps from greens towards shengs.

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100

Didn’t buy originally from this vendor but it is fair to include here to avoid disappointment with customer service anywhere else. It was very viscosy but not in a thick way. High quality just wasn’t my type as sent me to sleep almost simultaneously. Another trick, the cubes didn’t fit into opening of thermos so had to leave it half soaked in a cup to break a smaller piece. Could be compared to sweeter version of this

https://steepster.com/teas/chawangshop/91331-2012-dong-zhuang-qing-zhuan

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100

I just noticed that I created duplicate entry. Thought I checked if it was listed. Maybe it was with space in name. Or maybe one picture. Whatever. Will be careful next time as if there was not enough cleanup around to create my own trail of mess. It is not my review per se, more relaying what newbies introduced to it told me. I don’t expect them to review anything, so I am voluntarily stepping in for this honorary delegation duty. It is one of forms I only sent to others direct from vendors as these are more taste friendly. I do drink a lot of liubaos so I kind of know whom might benefit from it, medicinally. Anyways, I dump 80% of my blind buys so opportunity to give someone tea seems more aesthetic than compost legacy. This person were into oolongs which seems to be a marijuana of teas. The gateway. So all they had were ripe tuochas, dogwood berries, gotu kola, Hainan kuding, apart from that they are fermented liver diet proponents. So their report is that this guangxi chenpi is facilitating contemplation and “flushed in the face”. Moldavite flush ? How do I introduce someone to green brick. Tough. There is a site I bought few times called “liu-art-tea”, it could be my obsolete tablet of workplace setting but I can’t copy/ paste text and/ or images. Not sure when I feel enthusiastic to print descriptions and type them manually. Maybe at next eclipse ? But I checked, and they do have orange liubao brick. Pricey. Shipping from Germany costs as much as DHL from Kunming. So my plan is to roll-out tianjian, mojun and old tree liubao instead. I still think it is intuition that is guiding people towards tea. And their body immediately knows it is good. And then it is just tweaking of nuances. Myself prime example, was sceptically eyeing my ex Czech gf years ago having white tea in a plastic bottle that she would occasionally heat in a microwave. I was into scotch whiskey at the time. So there is time for everything. Like seasons in politics. Hope they never run out of fruit to stuff heicha with. I mean, 6 billion people, 6 million dolphins, what is ratio of tea to tangerines on this planet ? If there was a war between tangerines and tuochas, would we have northern Irish style of make love synergy ? Is it silence, is it breeze tumbleweed emptyness, is it a snowcoated cockroach melting inside my head. Oh, brewing, they don’t have gas, which takes 45 mins to bring slowly to boil from cold, which is my new fav as it super economical. I mean 5g for 8 cups. So they had electric hob and it took 20 mins. I would push it for continue boiling for 20 mins, but that’s me. Accidental discovery when got fresh as opposite to dried gotu kola that smelt gorgeous but wasn’t as oily when brewed. So boiling from cold took care of that. And it works for lots bearable brews. Not sure what metallurgy behind it. Maybe it is additional kill-green processing ? Who knows, will see if it gets it artificial intelligence cookbook in 200 years from now.

https://www.thejournal.ie/readme/the-bee-sanctuary-of-ireland-biodiversity-5456430-Jun2021/

derk

What a journey.

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100

I would say this is way biased but it started more than few days ago. First, somehow I didn’t finish two decades old liu bao in work last Thursday. Mad idea, knowing that will be back today, just le n thermos. That means drinking cold first thing in the morning while waiting on blend of shu minibrick and gotu kola to brew. Worse, grabbed sugar free grape fanta in local minimarkt. On top of that, kvass offered by eastern European colleague. Then packages started coming in. Two liubaos, sample of shu, and then this. It was intense. The only shous i really was drawn to procure were either bricks or loose. If this was my first liubao, I would have been scrambling for the wrong one, probably would have stumbled into green brick and maybe hubei one. But looking forward to drop a chunk of it into mirror glazed thermos tomorrow morning to see if I was just having detox aftershock trembles. The trouble is, the lastbtea I got today was Sichuan brick and I left it brewing in thermocup as had to leave work earlier than expected. You can’t plan these things, it will be cold in the morning, then thermos grandpa brew of what is being reviewed and then 2nd gonat Sichuan. If I don’t make it thru the day, the autopsy will be inconclusive. That’s the best legacy.

Preparation
Boiling 8 min or more
mrmopar

We will hope it isn’t as drastic to require an autopsy!

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91

Expected a bit more punch and creativity but got traded for really mild taste and slumber. Needs more leaves to achieve taste than most but price point makes it a good deal. Unlike others, doesn’t need to be boiled from cold at ultra light heat for 45 mins. Below average mirror lined thermos, made in India, from IKEA is sufficient to brew properly. Kills food cravings, sends to bed if accompanied with two cans of Irish stout beer. Wonder if mixing it with young raw puerh would give it a bit of tanginess and/ or caffeine kick. Although proximity to Vietnam is mentioned as a source, a totally different experience from so called border version. Curious how Malaysian storage would factor in here. Definitely in its own category.

Preparation
Boiling 8 min or more 1 tsp 17 OZ / 500 ML

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100

It is very mild, not viscous like hua zhuan or sandy as hei zhuan. Maybe closer to qian liang but feels more complex and subtle at the same time. Actually reminds me single origin ropes but really aged, maybe like in Singapore. It is as different from any heicha I had as Macau to Borneo storage for liubao. It has weird contrast between how unoily it is and the warmth it sending from stomach to lungs. I went thru half of 350g pack of raclette cheese meant for cooking while drinking liabaos and files for last few hours this morning. Now this one halted this madness. So good for not munching. Can I drinkmit at work ? I mean, is it a day tranquilizer. If so, I can value volume 5 times from aged liubao. Maybe this is the future of post-pandemic investment. Now will have to monitor my dreams. Will I wake up on different planet ? I am getting tired of waiting for mother ship to take from this planet anyway. Maybe it’s a shortcut. Chawangshop is your place to go for pressed tickets to inter dimensional travel. One way for me please.

Preparation
Boiling 8 min or more 5 g 7 OZ / 200 ML

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95

I could have added profile picture from their website. But maybe someone else wants to do it with actually how it looks in a bag. Not much of a drinking note, more what goes thru my mind while drinking it. Got a free huaning cup so experimenting with that. Not sure if should get matching gaiwan, Japanese style. It is close to traditional style of liubao. Looked at nixing teapots, not sure how to combine by brutalist thermos brewing with aesthetics of teapot. I mean, it should at least look like something I want to hold in hand. I was just thought if I was on a yacht, what kind of clay would be best to absorb sea air. What kind of tea I would like to have after drinking craft beer the night before, while sitting at a terrace looking out on a beach, waiting for omelets to be ready. Maybe get eggs from seagulls. Maybe catch a crab. Maybe put a seaweed into my thermos. Thank god I am not in position to make any of these life defining decisions. One observation. I recall reading about yak butter tea that it was custom to fill it up to the drink and refill after few sips. I do it with most teas. This one, no. As if it needs to be cooled and drank from the bottom. I guess that’s normal. My issue with anything but porcelain/ glass that I can’t see colour of the brew. This one is beautiful in a yellowish speckled cup.

Preparation
Boiling 8 min or more 4 g 27 OZ / 800 ML

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96

I do try lots of teas and my taste shifts with cravings for other consumables. So this is not strictly a review rather than my observation as why I was drawn to it and why it is worth considering as a sample. I am very messy person and even grandpa brewing leaves collateral damage. I am still amazed that I have no insects nesting on my floor considering layers of stems and dried berry stones covering it. So my only way to brew is mirror lined thermos. I did try clay lined thermos but to no avail. The only other way I try to brew tea is boiling them from cold which works for qian liang and liu bao. I progressed from oolongs to raws and onto liubao. So any other buys are incidental. But this one is something. It smells like oolong but brews like raw. The taste reminds me of white chenpi. I know you are disappointed with the depth of lame detail. I just think it will appeal to anyone into stoney greens or light oolongs. Not sure about body feel because I am buzzing from blackthorn that was boiled in fu brick. Another tea that comes to mind is Hainan green. Anyway, it’s subtle and unique as expected from vendors description. Just recalled years ago I was into golden key oolong but this one has flowerer aftertaste. The good thing it doesn’t make me sleepy or hungry and in fact has subtle chelation effect as if you chewed dried dogwood berries. I thought Tahiti was on my bucket list but even in good flat earth times it was more than 24 hours flights. I think this just changed to the teahouse I got it from. They are very generous with samples from their private stashes, the ones that are not on sale but something that is a treat for guest. Now I am thinking about adding few tea leaves to jam jar for soaking. It means I have to reboil the tea and see what other rogue ideas are being broadcast in the aether.

Preparation
Boiling 8 min or more 5 g 14 OZ / 400 ML

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80
drank 2017 Fo Shou by Chawangshop
16 tasting notes

It’s been a while since I last drank this tea, yet I vividly remember its forward aromas of pear and peaches. The roast had already settled nicely last year.

Flavors: Caramel, Peach, Pear

Preparation
8 g 4 OZ / 120 ML

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65

An unexpensive yet well balanced tea. It doesn’t seem to have aged a lot as it tastes a bit younger than the tag. But the truth is that I don’t feel any outstanding flavors or aromas that need much more polishing to be enjoyable.

Bright, greenish, herbal, bitter and slightly astringent. Soapy bitterness that leads to a quick huigan slap. In the nose there are aromas to lime leaves and capers. Some chaqi but not much. The material has a fair amount of whole medium leaves and twigs.

Flavors: Citrus, Flowers, Green Apple, Soap, Umami

Preparation
195 °F / 90 °C 0 min, 15 sec 9 g 4 OZ / 120 ML

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65

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78

Gongfu from last weekend…

Really nice tea – I drank it in bed, and snacked on Niagara grapes in between the steeps. It was sort of that type of Gongfu session where you’re just deeply in the moment and not very aware of exactly what you’re tasting, more just how that tea makes you feel. That feeling, for me, was cozy and safe and maybe even a little nostalgic? I did make an instagram post for this tea but even there I didn’t capture a lot of the flavours the day I was drinking this tea – in fact here’s the general three statements I used to sum this one up:

- Smooth
- Deep earthy body
- Smoke and ash notes

I’d add in a bit of leather, thinking back on it as well.

Photos: https://www.instagram.com/p/B2t2TKrAV7B/

Song Pairing: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1sXTLkjF8bI

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drank 2016 Chawangpu Bada by Chawangshop
15 tasting notes

Yes, a good one!

Not much to add to the other reviews here. It’s a good harmony of flavours and aromas, doesn’t have the potency of other shengs but it gives a well balanced, floral, fruity and medicinal tasting drink with hints of grass and wood. Cup melified instantly and is easy to drink, because is on the softer side.
The lingering aftertaste is quite long and it reminded me of albariño white wine.

Quite good value at $24. Moar! :)

Flavors: Floral, Fruity, Grass, Spices

Preparation
200 °F / 93 °C 0 min, 15 sec 6 g 3 OZ / 100 ML

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100

OMG!!!
So I wasn’t going to write up anything about this one I was just going to drink it….Then I got tea buzz and I wrote a 5 stars review in my head….Now It’s gone and I don’t know what to say or think or feel…I think feel good tho lol.

This is one of the most Extreme Tea Drunk Buzzy feeling that I have had in a long time, maybe ever.
It reminds me of my earlier years of tea drinking, I stayed tea drunk often both accidentally and on purpose and I really enjoyed it, This time was an accident but I am still enjoying it.

Really tho the force is so strong with this one, it will hit you like a ton of bricks, at one point I wasnt sure about it myself, i was really like WTF!! there for a minute, Very Intense!!

I see you 2 still have this one in your cupboards here on the steepster, taste it, i need to know how it made you feel lol

Gonna go drink more and enjoy my bliss :)

Thank You MzPriss, I think you sent me this one a while back and I’ve been sitting on it.

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I’ve just tried a few Chawang Shop teas and this wasn’t a favorite, but it has an interesting character and potential so I’ll mention how that went. I think now (in 2019) it’s right in between losing the last of it’s younger-range character and picking up aged attributes, even though it’s a 2008 version, 11 years old now. The flavor is as subtle as I’ve ever experienced in sheng, which has actually came up before in trying aged Yiwu versions. The thickness of feel is positive, and although the flavor isn’t pronounced the wood and mild floral tones are positive. I think it will get there, it will just take a few more years. For value this is off the scale; it was priced at $40 for a 250 gram cake, and I think it will be subtle but quite decent aged tea within 2 to 3 years. Note that the tea is yellow-golden in these pictures; I think that along with the flavor aspects will change over that time, darkening in color and moving onto warmer tones, maybe even very mild dried fruit range.

The review post goes a lot further with all that and cites a couple of related reviews to support more speculation about aging pace and general character of related versions:

http://teaintheancientworld.blogspot.com/2019/07/2008-yong-pin-hao-yiwu-zhen-shan-sheng.html

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It was interesting comparing this impression with the two reviews here from 3 years ago, since this tea is 13 years old now. It’s still not really completely fermented. As for aspects it tastes a lot like cigar tobacco, including smoke, with decent sweetness and flavor complexity and really good intensity. Bitterness is still pronounced, although astringency is moderate. Mineral taste is notable too, along with floral range or maybe dried fruit; that part is harder to tease out for bitterness, smoke, tobacco, and mineral standing out as much as they do. I think it just needs another 3 years or so in a humid environment to really push over into being a very good tea, and in 5 or 6 might be exceptional, but it’s pleasant as it is now. It’s definitely not in some subtle, quiet “teen years” phase; this tea is intense.

I forgot to mention compression; that’s the part of this tea’s story that account for why a 13 year old tea isn’t aging normally. Of course that makes it harder to split off parts to brew as well. It’s still worth the trouble, and will be even more so later on.

http://teaintheancientworld.blogspot.com/2019/07/2006-kokang-myanmar-mei-hua-sheng-puer.html

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This is a little unusual since I’m reviewing this tea in 2019, as an aged product, versus the other reviews here appearing in 2017. I really liked it. Quality was quite evident from the very thick feel, good balance, and overall clean character. It could’ve been a little sweeter, and vegetal range was a little heavy compared to other scope (green wood or just cured wood, or both), but moderate floral range, a pleasant level and type of mineral, and some dried fruit filled that in. This tea is amazing for value, increased from $20 to $24 in two years, for a 200 gram cake. I’m not sure if or when it will “go quiet” due to the teenage years theme but I suspect that moderate humidity storage isn’t rushing that process, so it has probably lost some youthful intensity and bitterness, and the smoke others mentioned, but it’s still quite vibrant and intense. This is the really long version of all that:

http://teaintheancientworld.blogspot.com/2019/06/2016-chawang-shop-bada-and-on-puer.html

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Gongfu!

This past Thursday was International Tea Day! The first one, as recognized by the UN, in fact! I feel like over on instagram we were all celebrating in different ways & I guess for me that ended up meaning (unintentionally) trying new things with my tea session. AKA stabbing myself with a pu’erh pick for the first time. I was trying to break off a piece of this VERY tightly compressed hiecha brick and I just lost my grip and punctured into the dead center of my right hand about a centimeter deep…

Was it worth it for the heicha session though!? Yeah, I think so.

I guess, after about five years of drinking compressed tea, this sort of right of passage was bound to happen eventually. I wonder, now that the pick has tasted blood will it be out for more!?

Photos: https://www.instagram.com/p/CAd1hNiAHzB/ Of the tea, not my hand…

Song Pairing: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N1gQvMF-tzU

Flavors: Camphor, Petrichor, Wet Earth, Wet Wood

Nattie

Ouch! I wish I had known about International Tea Day – I only had one tea on Thursday and mostly drank coffee, for the first time in a while! It was my favourite tea ever though (Maple Pecan Oolong) and my 500th tasting note that day, so I guess that counts for something.

Nattie

Omg I just saw your vamp face Spike pop in the background – how fitting, lol. I have the same pop and it’s my favourite one, probably my most expensive, too.

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Gong Fu!

This one is weird because it’s from the sort of “limbo” period between when I was feeling really sick and when I was feeling a lot better (though still not 100%). It was a really nice session, and after nearly 48 hours of being stuck in bed, sore, and quite sleepless I found the routine of brewing Gong Fu quite calming and peaceful, and the tea made me feel very relaxed.

I’m still very new to Liubao/Heicha in general and I’m dipping my toes into this new area of tea fairly slowly – but this seemed a lot different than the few other kinds of heicha that I’ve tried before. It’s very tightly compressed into a brick shape but steeping it broke apart so quickly (after like infusion two!) in the little glass Gong Fu teapot I was using and basically was this highly broken up sort of CTC looking grade of leaf. I’m glad I did choose to use a teapot with a strainer in it, because this leaf was pretty fine! I don’t generally use a strainer as part of my Gong Fu set up, so I imagine with a gaiwan this would have really gotten into my Cha Hai and cup…

Photos: https://www.instagram.com/p/BwVaGWiHKX5/

You can see how fine the leaf was in the final image/video…

Still pretty earthy, but also surprisingly sweet and fruity. I don’t 100% trust my taste buds from this session though because the finishing note for nearly every steep was reminding me heavily of sweet blackberry leaf and Fuzzy Peach candies; which is certainly strange. Probably better to retaste this when I feel completely fine…

Song Pairing: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IDZkdkPHQ00

(Good music for calm, slow evenings – and when you’re feeling sick and kind of hazy…)

derk

Had a good and very different experience with some liu bao Togo sent me, so I bought a few each of some liu bao, liu an and fu zhuan to try out.

Roswell Strange

I’ve yet to venture into Heicha outside of Liu Bao – that was what was recommended to me by someone on instagram who is VERY into heicha that I trust quite a bit with recommendations. I’m sure I will at some point, but I like the idea of getting very comfortable with one type first before jumping into others. Where did you purchase yours from?

(Also, we should totally swap at some point!)

derk

The liu bao and fu zhuan came from YS and the liu an from Yunnan Craft. I will keep you on my swap radar :) Have about 50 swap samples to make my way through until I’m ready.

john-in-siam

It sounds a lot more sweet and fruity than any version of Liu Bao I’ve ever tried, but then I’ve only tried a half dozen or so, all on the mineral and earthy side. A 2012 Three Cranes version had too much off storage flavor to be a fair representation, but after close to a year of airing out that faded.

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82

Gongfu!

Early evening session – was feeling something earthy and dank as fuck so this is what I pulled out! It’s been a while since I had some Liubao, and this really hit the spot. I got seven infusions before this was too weak to be satisfying, it started off aggressively thick and then steadily decline. So camphorous, with rich notes of wet & decaying wood, forest undergrowth, soaked potting soil, black currant, and molasses notes. It’s a little bit bitter, and thick as mud but I’m loving it!

Photos: https://www.instagram.com/p/B-sitpig5Rh/

Song Pairing: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=anlspQCQswo

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