95

After my third session with this tea, I can say that its cha qi is phenomenal. At first, we tend to enter into a dreamy realm, followed by a relaxed atmosphere and superb mind clarity.

The profile hasn’t changed much in the last year, I find it a bit sweeter though. There is also a more pronounced apricot flavour.

Song pairing: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XQtW4BRLQro

Flavors: Apricot, Astringent, Bitter, Floral, Honey, Sweet, Thick

Preparation
205 °F / 96 °C 0 min, 15 sec 6 g 3 OZ / 100 ML
derk

I look forward to your future notes for this tea. I’d like to see how the ‘baking’ as YS calls it effects the transformation.

mrmopar

I can’t say I have heard good things about baking puerh. I think it is Oolong style and won’t age as puerh is supposed to do.I think it is a drink now type of tea process.

Togo

I am pretty sure the baking the description is referring to has little to do with roasting that oolongs can go through. It’s just an alternative term for drying that all cakes have to undertake after pressing due to the humidity they acquire through the steaming involved. As far as I know, this can be done at ambient temperature or slightly higher. The latter may be especially useful when a pressing factory needs to increase their output at the end of the spring harvest in particular. I am not exactly sure how big of a difference does it make to dry cakes at 25C vs 35C, but I would be surprised if it had significant effect on the aging prospects, those are not temperatures that ought to be harmful to the bacteria present.

mrmopar

Yeah that isn’t that high of a temp. I think a lot of this type drying has been done in the last few years. I guess a few years down the road we will know how this affects the tea.

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Comments

derk

I look forward to your future notes for this tea. I’d like to see how the ‘baking’ as YS calls it effects the transformation.

mrmopar

I can’t say I have heard good things about baking puerh. I think it is Oolong style and won’t age as puerh is supposed to do.I think it is a drink now type of tea process.

Togo

I am pretty sure the baking the description is referring to has little to do with roasting that oolongs can go through. It’s just an alternative term for drying that all cakes have to undertake after pressing due to the humidity they acquire through the steaming involved. As far as I know, this can be done at ambient temperature or slightly higher. The latter may be especially useful when a pressing factory needs to increase their output at the end of the spring harvest in particular. I am not exactly sure how big of a difference does it make to dry cakes at 25C vs 35C, but I would be surprised if it had significant effect on the aging prospects, those are not temperatures that ought to be harmful to the bacteria present.

mrmopar

Yeah that isn’t that high of a temp. I think a lot of this type drying has been done in the last few years. I guess a few years down the road we will know how this affects the tea.

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Bio

Currently, I am a PhD student at the Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics in Ontario. Apart from teas and mathematics, I enjoy sports and traveling, as well as music of all kinds. Connect at https://rateyourmusic.com/~Togo

I have been a fan of green tea for a while and I started exploring other kinds of tea in greater depth only in 2017. I rarely drink blends and generally avoid artificially scented teas. Other than that I try to keep it varied.

My rating description:
100 _ Unforgettable tea, an experience that changes your life.
90 – 100 _ Excellent tea.
80 – 90 _ Very enjoyable, I will buy again.
70 – 80 _ I enjoyed it, but I most likely won’t be buying it again.
60 – 70 _ Decent.
50 – 60 _ Average, forgettable.
40 – 50 _ I didn’t really like the tea, but it is drinkable.
0 – 40 _ I would prefer to avoid the tea.

Location

Bratislava, Slovakia

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