Wu Yi Shan "Zi Hong Pao" Purple Da Hong Pao Oolong Tea (Spring 2019)

Tea type
Oolong Tea
Ingredients
Not available
Flavors
Campfire, Roasted, Smoke, Stonefruits, Wood
Sold in
Bulk
Caffeine
Not available
Certification
Not available
Edit tea info Last updated by Jade
Average preparation
200 °F / 93 °C 0 min, 30 sec 5 oz / 150 ml

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  • “Summary: This is a pretty decent tea, and it has the potential to be a VERY good tea. The tea broth is thick, rich, and very juicy. It’s got a good astringency, but never borders on bitter even...” Read full tasting note

From Yunnan Sourcing

“Zi Hong Pao” is a purple varietal that’s a naturally mutated offshoot from the classic “Da Hong Pao” varietal. It’s also called “Jiu Long Pao” (lit. 9 Dragon Robe) or Wu Yi varietal #303. It’s “medium-leaf” class of tea, not purely Assamica or Sinensis. The leaves are thick and dense with a purple/red/green color when fresh.

Zi Hong Pao is a very rare tea with only about 10 mu of land in total producing this tea. The buds and leaf shoots are slow to grow and the harvest is the last of the spring harvests.

Perhaps the most special aspect of “Zi Hong Pao” is the lovely delicious, thick and pungent tea that it brews. I recommend drinking the rinse. With just a 10 second rinse you are greeted with a vibrant and viscous tea soup. The second through the fifth infusions are really full and exciting to drink. The 6th through 8th infusion is still quite strong and pungent but the needs to be pushed a little bit.

Truly a remarkable tea in pedigree, taste and experience.

Late-April into Early May Harvest

Area: Wu Yi Mountains, Xing Zhen, Cao Dun Village

About Yunnan Sourcing View company

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1 Tasting Note

54 tasting notes

Summary: This is a pretty decent tea, and it has the potential to be a VERY good tea. The tea broth is thick, rich, and very juicy. It’s got a good astringency, but never borders on bitter even when pushed. The flavors aren’t complex with primary notes of roast / sweet wood with hints of stone fruit. Even though this tea is a side varietal of Da Hong Pao, it has aspects of a Dan Cong.

I think it’d be interesting to see how this ages over time. I think it’ll become an amazing tea. (Side Note: This would make a good grandpa style brewed tea as of right now)

Brew Times: 20s, 30, 45, 75, 90,120…
Brew Temps: 200F, 201F, 199F, 199F, 199F

The wet leaves had high notes of stone fruit turning into sweet sugar with later infusions. There were low notes of roast, fire, and woodsmoke.

The liquid gave off hints of orange/citrus.

The tea broth is very thick & viscous, nice on the tongue. This tea goes down easy with a medium to long finish. It has a medium-long astringency that started on the edges of my tongue then the whole tongue.

Flavors: Strong initial wood flavors with hints of fruit at either the beginning or end, depending on the steep, which would then mellow out

Flavors: Campfire, Roasted, Smoke, Stonefruits, Wood

Preparation
200 °F / 93 °C 0 min, 30 sec 5 tsp 5 OZ / 150 ML

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