2019 Yunnan Sourcing "Ding Jia Zhai" Ancient Arbor Raw Pu-erh Tea Cake

Tea type
Pu-erh Tea
Ingredients
Not available
Flavors
Apricot, Bitter, Burnt Food, Butter, Citrus, Coffee, Floral, Fruity, Grapefruit, Grass, Nuts, Orange, Popcorn, Roasted nuts, Smooth, Spinach, Sweet, Tropical, Umami, Vegetables, White Grapes, Wood
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Caffeine
Not available
Certification
Not available
Edit tea info Last updated by Togo
Average preparation
205 °F / 96 °C 0 min, 15 sec 8 g 3 oz / 90 ml

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  • “I got a sample of this tea earlier this year and after one session went and bought the cake straight away. It’s a pungent and clean tasting tea with a unique aroma, bitter and floral taste, and a...” Read full tasting note
    96

From Yunnan Sourcing

We have selected first flush of spring harvest (第一波春茶) wild arbor material from the area of “Ding Jia Zhai” (丁家寨), a mountain area near Lao Man Sa in the Yi Wu mountain range. Ding Jia Zhai is inhabited primarily by Yao people who have for centuries picked and processed these wild arbor trees. Ding Jia Zhai area teas are known for their special thick aroma and a taste that with age becomes stronger and more textured. This tea comes from wild arbor trees between 200 and 300 years old. When brewing the tea you will notice the tea soup is a bright yellow-gold and clear, the aroma is penetrating and the tea is full in the mouth. The flavor is textured and thick with a strong and vegetal taste . This is one of the more smooth and aromatic of the Yi Wu area teas, but its still got a fair amount of bitterness and long-lasting huigan that stimulates the mouth and throat long afterwards. The brewed leaves are thick and stout attesting to their wild arbor origin.

This tea was compressed in a small tea factory in Yi Wu town where unusually large 40 kilogam stone presses were used. Low temperature (35C) “baking” was used to dry these cakes after the compression process thus preserving their integrity! In total just 15 kilograms of this tea has been produced. We have delayed sales of this cake for more than 4 weeks to allow the water vapor from pressing to dissipate. Further aging will only improve this wonderful tea!

April 2019 Harvested Tea

Just 15 kilos in total produced! (75 cakes)

200 grams per cake (7 cakes per bamboo tong)

Wrapper Design by Sara G.

About Yunnan Sourcing View company

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1 Tasting Note

96
543 tasting notes

I got a sample of this tea earlier this year and after one session went and bought the cake straight away. It’s a pungent and clean tasting tea with a unique aroma, bitter and floral taste, and a lightly fruity aftertaste with a strong huigan. The price is relatively good at the moment as well, so I had no reason to hesitate. Interestingly, the leaves have a relatively dark olive green colour, darker than any young sheng from standard varietals that I can recall.

Starting with the dry leaf aroma, I can smell nuts, apricot and spinach most of all, but also some kind of flowery scent. The aroma of wet leaves is strong, complex and hard to identify. It is a little bit oolong like (think Taiwanese high mountain oolong without a lot of the florals). Some all-over-the-place fleeting notes I get include coffee, tangerine, stewed vegetables, and popcorn.

The rinse already gives a good impression of the tea’s taste profile. It is a mix of bitter, floral and sweet; very viscous and yet it feels light in the mouth. Later on the tea gets incredibly fragrant, but not as perfumy as some other Yi Wu shengs I’ve tried. Apart from that, it tastes grassy and woody, with a decent umami and notes of roasted nuts, white grapes, swiss chard, and burnt food. Deep bitterness persists throughout the whole session, but the tea never gets overly astringent.

Ding Jia Zhai is an all-round great tea, but its aftertaste is one of the highlights for sure. It has some spiciness and a kind of sticky sweetness to it. On top of that, a few fruity flavours emerge that are absent when drinking the tea, most notably tones of orange, grapefruit, pawpaw, and chamomile. The huigan is remarkable even relative to other (supposedly) gu shu teas. The flavours of this tea stay with you and slowly evolve for a long time.

Mouthfeel wise, I found the tea maybe a bit less interesting, but still very enjoyable. The texture is smooth and oily and the body is medium. As for the cha qi, this tea has a nice subtly creeping, calming energy that’s not rushy. It is not one that would send you to the stratosphere I reckon, but I like it. I think this would be a good tea for social occasions.

Song pairing: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9wxZ1DV9xO4

edit: I ended the session at 17 steeps today, but the tea seemed like it had a bit more to give, being still quite flavourful and thick even at these late stages.

Flavors: Apricot, Bitter, Burnt Food, Butter, Citrus, Coffee, Floral, Fruity, Grapefruit, Grass, Nuts, Orange, Popcorn, Roasted nuts, Smooth, Spinach, Sweet, Tropical, Umami, Vegetables, White Grapes, Wood

Preparation
205 °F / 96 °C 0 min, 15 sec 8 g 3 OZ / 90 ML
Natethesnake

If you like bitter yesheng the slumbering dragon is interesting and he has 17,18&19 harvests available. If you haven’t tried these it’s definitely interesting to do a vertical tasting of these as the bitterness fades quickly. It’s very expensive for yesheng but worth sampling

Togo

Thanks for the recommendation :)
I do have a sample of the 2017 harvest, but I wasn’t very impressed with it and actually haven’t found it very bitter at all.

I seem to prefer the Ye Sheng black teas to shengs, but I just got some aged Ye Sheng samples so I am curious to try those out :)

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