Wu Liang Mountain Gao Shan Oolong Certified Organic tea * Spring 2017

Tea type
Oolong Tea
Ingredients
Oolong Tea Leaves
Flavors
Apricot, Butter, Cream, Custard, Floral, Gardenias, Grass, Green Apple, Lettuce, Mineral, Orange Zest, Pear, Seaweed, Spinach, Sugarcane, Umami, Vanilla, Vegetal
Sold in
Bulk, Loose Leaf
Caffeine
Not available
Certification
Organic
Edit tea info Last updated by eastkyteaguy
Average preparation
6 g 4 oz / 118 ml

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From Our Community

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3 Tasting Notes View all

  • “This was a gift from a coworker, and it’s pretty dang old so I made it Grandpa style in the hope that the longer and more prolonger steep might help draw out some more flavour and life from the...” Read full tasting note
  • “This was actually my most recent sipdown as I finished the last of a 50g pouch of this tea earlier in the day. Honestly, I rushed to review this tea because it struck me as being rather unique. It...” Read full tasting note
    89
  • “Dry leaf bursts with grassy, floral, apple and some mint. reminds me of some good thai oolong actually. wet leaf is buttery with slight warm spice like nutmeg. bit of bean sprout liquor fairly...” Read full tasting note
    88

From Yunnan Sourcing

The high mountains of the Wu Liang range in Simao are home to some of the greatest teas in Yunnan. Perfect weather, high altitude and a pristine natural environment give this medium-light oxidized oolong a high level of fragrance as well as a stout thick and healthy leaf that can be brewed many times (much more than any Anxi oolong). This particular “High Mountain” oolong was hand-processed by a Taiwanese master who came to Yunnan more than decade ago in search of the best place to grow his high mountain oolongs.

Certified Organic by COFCC China!

Spring 2017 Harvest

If you order 150 grams it will come in original factory vacuum packaging, lesser quantities will be re-packed in high quality foil pouches.

About Yunnan Sourcing View company

Company description not available.

3 Tasting Notes

9781 tasting notes

This was a gift from a coworker, and it’s pretty dang old so I made it Grandpa style in the hope that the longer and more prolonger steep might help draw out some more flavour and life from the leaves – since they smelled pretty flat/stale. It kind of worked, the flavour did get stronger and there were more detectable notes of butter, pea flowers, and florals with a greener vegetal undertone. However, it was still a bit flat/lacking life even if the overall flavours were there…

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89
900 tasting notes

This was actually my most recent sipdown as I finished the last of a 50g pouch of this tea earlier in the day. Honestly, I rushed to review this tea because it struck me as being rather unique. It reminded me of some of the jade oolongs that are coming out of Taiwan, though I suppose it really should considering that the gentleman who produced this tea is Taiwanese. This tea, however, was more than just a Taiwanese-style oolong produced in Yunnan Province; it was an oolong that very skillfully demonstrated the effects that a different terroir can have on a tea.

I prepared this tea gongfu style. After a brief rinse, I steeped 6 grams of rolled tea leaves in 4 ounces of 194 F water for 10 seconds. This infusion was chased by 15 additional infusions. Steep times for these infusions were as follows: 12 seconds, 16 seconds, 20 seconds, 25 seconds, 30 seconds, 40 seconds, 50 seconds, 1 minute, 1 minute 15 seconds, 1 minute 30 seconds, 2 minutes, 3 minutes, 5 minutes, 7 minutes, and 9 minutes.

Prior to the rinse, the dry tea leaves emitted aromas of cream, vanilla, custard, and gardenia. After the rinse, I detected aromas of vanilla and sugarcane accompanied by hints of spinach. The first infusion introduced butter and soup broth-like umami scents. In the mouth, the tea liquor offered notes of cream, vanilla, butter, and sugarcane that were backed by faint gardenia notes and hints of umami, spinach, grass, and sour apricot in the aftertaste. Subsequent infusions saw the emergence of a stronger and saltier umami presence on the nose, a stronger spinach aroma, and the introduction of subtle grass, watercress, lettuce, apricot, orange zest, and pear scents. In the mouth, stronger gardenia, apricot, grass, and umami notes were present, though I also found new impressions of lettuce, green apple, minerals, watercress, daylily, daylily shoots, seaweed, pear, and orange zest. Custard impressions belatedly emerged in the mouth as well. The lengthier later infusions offered lingering notes of minerals, daylily shoots, grass, umami, and butter that were backed by sugarcane, vanilla, green apple, and pear hints.

While this tea did offer aromas and flavors I normally associate with Taiwanese oolongs of this style, its mouthfeel was much heavier, thicker, and pricklier. The way the flavors expressed themselves was brasher and more strident. The tea almost felt as if it had a bit of swagger to it. It also displayed surprising longevity compared to some of its foreign counterparts. I actually could have kept going with this session, but it was getting late. The tea liquor was also starting to get a bit chalky and astringent for my liking, so I cut it off where I did. All in all, this was a fascinating and highly enjoyable rolled oolong. I doubt I would pick it over similar teas from Taiwan and Southeast Asia since I happen to enjoy a bit of restraint and subtlety in teas of this type, yet I would certainly not turn down a tea like this in the future. Check it out if you are looking for an oolong with a bit more bluster and liveliness.

Flavors: Apricot, Butter, Cream, Custard, Floral, Gardenias, Grass, Green Apple, Lettuce, Mineral, Orange Zest, Pear, Seaweed, Spinach, Sugarcane, Umami, Vanilla, Vegetal

Preparation
6 g 4 OZ / 118 ML
LuckyMe

This was one of the first jade oolongs I was introduced to. While I enjoyed it back then, I agree with your characterization. It’s a little rough around the edges. Good for what it is though

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88
87 tasting notes

Dry leaf bursts with grassy, floral, apple and some mint. reminds me of some good thai oolong actually.
wet leaf is buttery with slight warm spice like nutmeg. bit of bean sprout

liquor fairly light but persistent sweet flavour. marzipan, butter

delicate and tasty

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