Ta Ku Hou Village High Mountain Dan Cong * Spring 2017

Tea type
Oolong Tea
Ingredients
Oolong Tea Leaves
Flavors
Almond, Apple, Cherry, Citrus, Cream, Eucalyptus, Fruity, Grass, Honey, Honeydew, Lychee, Mineral, Nutmeg, Orange Blossom, Orchid, Peach, Pear, Plums, Sugarcane, Vanilla, Violet, Wood
Sold in
Loose Leaf
Caffeine
Not available
Certification
Not available
Edit tea info Last updated by eastkyteaguy
Average preparation
6 g 4 oz / 118 ml

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2 Tasting Notes View all

  • “After I finished my black tea binge earlier in the month, I more or less tore into a bunch of Dan Cong oolongs I had lying around, taking only brief breaks to work my way through a couple extra...” Read full tasting note
    94
  • “Rinsed once this fellow developed such an intense fruity thick honey-ish scent – breath taking! This scents really stick to nearly everything around you – it manifest within your nose, later in...” Read full tasting note
    91

From Yunnan Sourcing

Ta Ku Hou village is a small village near Phoenix town just to the west at an altitude of 1350 meters. This is one of highest altitude villages in the Wu Dong mountainous area. Our Ta Ku Hou Dan Cong is grown by one family and is from a small crop harvested from their own small tea garden. The trees are between 60 and 120 years old and grow wild without intervention.

The tea itself is medium leaf, dry leaf is dark in color and when brewed is typically green with some brown. The tea has been hand-picked and processed at each stage, and took more than a month of labor to complete. The taste is very vibrant and complex with notes of fruit and eucalyptus. There is a slight bitter which accentuates the fruity sweetness this tea delivers. It’s got a strong mouth-feel, cha qi and is very infusable.

A premium small-batch Dan Cong that imparts the depth and wisdom of this incredible tradition to those fortunate enough to try it.

3.2 kilograms in total!

Late-March 2017 harvest and processing

About Yunnan Sourcing View company

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2 Tasting Notes

94
936 tasting notes

After I finished my black tea binge earlier in the month, I more or less tore into a bunch of Dan Cong oolongs I had lying around, taking only brief breaks to work my way through a couple extra black teas, some other oolongs, and a green tea or two. The 2018 Xing Ren Xiang from Wuyi Origin was the tea that got the current binge started, but this tea may be the one most responsible for perpetuating it. Specifically, it spurred me to prioritize trying some of the rarer and more unusual Dan Cong oolongs. Unfortunately, I have yet to hit on one that satisfied me the way this tea did. Quite frankly, I found it to be an exceptional offering.

I prepared this tea gongfu style. After rinsing, I steeped 6 grams of loose tea leaves in 4 ounces of 203 F water for 6 seconds. This infusion was chased by 16 additional infusions. Steep times for these infusions were as follows: 9 seconds, 12 seconds, 16 seconds, 20 seconds, 25 seconds, 30 seconds, 40 seconds, 50 seconds, 1 minute, 1 minute 15 seconds, 1 minute 30 seconds, 2 minutes, 3 minutes, 5 minutes, 7 minutes, and 10 minutes.

Prior to the rinse, the dry tea leaves produced aromas of honey, peach, tangerine, lychee, cream, and vanilla. After the rinse, I detected new aromas of orange blossom and roasted almond. The first infusion introduced aromas of grass, sugarcane, and orchid. In the mouth, the tea liquor presented notes of honey, peach, lychee, tangerine, orchid, and orange blossom that were chased by vanilla, sugarcane, and grass hints. I also noted a subtle eucalyptus presence in the aftertaste. Subsequent infusions introduced aromas of pear, nutmeg, caraway, violet, plum, and cherry. Cream notes came out in the mouth along with notes of minerals, nutmeg, pear, caraway, wood, violet, plum, and honeydew. There were also some subtle notes of red currant, cherry, and apple here and there. By the end of the session, I could still detect subtle notes of minerals, pear, lychee, tangerine, wood, apple, and cream in the tea liquor that were underscored by roasted almond, orchid, grass, violet, and vanilla accents. The subtle eucalyptus presence was still noticeable in the aftertaste too.

This was an absolutely fascinating and fantastic oolong. That cooling eucalyptus hint after every swallow kept me diving back into cup after cup. And for a Dan Cong oolong, this tea was ridiculously long-lived. Each infusion offered something to appreciate, and despite the tea’s depth and complexity, everything worked well together. Yeah, I found this to be a great tea. I can’t really find serious fault with it. It turned a little soapy and slick toward the end of my review session, but even then, the texture was never what I would describe as unpleasant. Definitely check this tea out if you are at all interested in Dan Cong oolongs.

Flavors: Almond, Apple, Cherry, Citrus, Cream, Eucalyptus, Fruity, Grass, Honey, Honeydew, Lychee, Mineral, Nutmeg, Orange Blossom, Orchid, Peach, Pear, Plums, Sugarcane, Vanilla, Violet, Wood

Preparation
6 g 4 OZ / 118 ML
Daylon R Thomas

Sounds lovely.

derk

I’ve had either this 2017 or a 2016, before I even knew what dan cong oolong was. Sadly, I don’t think I was able to appreciate it at the time. I do remember it being a very intense tea, both in delivery and the amount of pure, clean flavors involved.

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91
72 tasting notes

Rinsed once this fellow developed such an intense fruity thick honey-ish scent – breath taking! This scents really stick to nearly everything around you – it manifest within your nose, later in your mouth and the air surrounding your tea session. Aroma of honey, magnolia delivered with a big fruit basket of juicy fresh mango, lychee and a hint of pineapple also left some space for a very nutty fusion of pine nuts and hazelnut. Especially within the taste this nutty a bit harsh mineral tone prepared the ground for a very VERY long lasting fruity sweet aftertaste experience which stick to your tasting buds for a very long time. Like I mentioned this pine nuts and hazelnut taste was one side of the coin but the other side definitely was a mix between raisins, honey-beeswax flavor, magnolia, mango and Japanese sweet soft bread. That’s it and it is totally enough because all those nuances are very well balanced and they play their parts perfectly without any off-time to it. Take it easy you can at least enjoy it for around 7 infusions – with Chao Zhou style even 12 or more.

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