Golden Guan Yin Da Hong Pao oolong tea Spring 2015

Tea type
Oolong Tea
Ingredients
Not available
Flavors
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Loose Leaf
Caffeine
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Certification
Not available
Edit tea info Last updated by apefuzz
Average preparation
205 °F / 96 °C 0 min, 15 sec 6 g 5 oz / 147 ml

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2 Tasting Notes View all

  • “The change in seasons really allows me to appreciate how the comforting, roasted, and mineral elements of Wuyi teas contrast with the often floral/honey-sweet, powerful, bitter, earthy, and vegetal...” Read full tasting note
  • “Dry leaf: NUTTY, SWEET (nut, dry nut/acorn, walnut, coriander, dark chocolate, hazelnut, mocha. In preheated vessel: sweet and sour, oily citrus notes develop in addition to notes above.) Smell:...” Read full tasting note
    95

From Yunnan Sourcing

Spring harvest Da Hong Pao from older Da Hong Pao bushes growing in Tong Mu Guan village in Wu Yi Mountains of Fujian.

Lightly processed to enhance it’s subtle and complex character, the Golden Guan Yin (金观音) Da Hong Pao is a rare treat. The taste is thick and sweet, with a strong lasting mouth-feeling that is expansive. The smell is penetrating with notes orchids and fresh betel nut.

About Yunnan Sourcing View company

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2 Tasting Notes

143 tasting notes

The change in seasons really allows me to appreciate how the comforting, roasted, and mineral elements of Wuyi teas contrast with the often floral/honey-sweet, powerful, bitter, earthy, and vegetal aspects of sheng pu I typically drink.

The first thing I notice about this one is its sheer viscosity and smooth texture. It coasts the cup and the tongue like extra virgin olive oil. Beginning from the first few steeps, it’s complex in an unassuming way—roasted acorn and almond are accompanied with florals in the background and a nice mouthfeel. Mid steeps give way to more roasted almond, hazelnut and acorn, orange peel, bay leaf, leather, brown sugar, and molasses with persistent lingering florals.

There is less qi, mouthfeel, vibrancy throatiness, and floral sweetness than the Ai Jiao and Tie Luo Han—so far my favorite Wuyis, yet more comforting roasted nutty notes which is perfectly suited for the seasons here in the Northeast. This one yields around 7 tasty steeps and perhaps one or two more if pushed hard.

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95
167 tasting notes

Dry leaf: NUTTY, SWEET (nut, dry nut/acorn, walnut, coriander, dark chocolate, hazelnut, mocha. In preheated vessel: sweet and sour, oily citrus notes develop in addition to notes above.)

Smell: NUTTY, EARTHY (nut, autumn leaves, malt, sweet bread, light cinnamon/spice notes)

Taste: NUTTY, CITRUS, SWEET, EARTHY, FRUITY (oily citrus, coriander, sweet nut – almond and pecan – notes of cinnamon, hint of maple syrup, rich malty body, fresh wood, light wet rock minerality, strong fresh apricot and peach in aftertaste, even some red fruit in aftertaste.)

Oh man, this is good. Rich and complex, a tapestry of fruity and sweet notes woven together with earthy nuttiness, maltiness, and minerality.

I really admire the complexity of flavors. Coriander-like citrus, cinnamon notes that pop up, rich earthy and malty base, fresh and vibrant stonefruit hui gan… What a treat.

As much as I am a sucker for going out and trying new stuff, this tea WILL be purchased again. The experience well exceeds its modest price tag.

Preparation
205 °F / 96 °C 0 min, 15 sec 6 g 5 OZ / 147 ML

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