2015 Gao Jia Shan "Wu Long Mountain" Tian Jian from Hunan

Tea type
Black Tea
Ingredients
Black Teas
Flavors
Not available
Sold in
Bulk, Loose Leaf
Caffeine
Medium
Certification
Not available
Edit tea info Last updated by eastkyteaguy
Average preparation
Not available

Currently unavailable

We don't know when or if this item will be available.

From Our Community

3 Images

0 Want it Want it

5 Own it Own it

2 Tasting Notes View all

  • “Another unique and enjoyable tianjian from YS. The dried leaves are smallish and have a nice black cherry aroma and slight hint of pine wood charcoal. The tea soup is incredibly clear with a light...” Read full tasting note

From Yunnan Sourcing

Wu Long Mountain is the highest mountainous tea growing area in the Gao Jia Shan area of Anhua County. Wu Long Mountain is blessed with steep slopes and copious karst-like outcroppings. Much like Gao Jia Shan the tea grows wonderfully here and has a mineral base from the karst rocks which form the underlying “root” for the tea trees and bushes growing there.

Gao Jia Shan is both a place and the name of the tea factory brand that produced this lovely tea. Gao Jia Shan as a producer doesn’t have as long of a history as Yi Yang and Bai Sha Xi tea factories but nonetheless produces very high quality Fu Brick tea processed in the traditional manner.

This Wu Long Mountain Tian Jian is made from the first flush of Spring material. The tea was processed into raw Tian Jian (aka mao cha), then roasted, then re-roasted with under a smokey fire, then aged briefly before being steamed to soften and pressed into 5 kilogram hand-woven baskets! We have added the option for you to buy the whole basket if you so wish!

Spring 2015 harvest tea leaves (Packed in August 2015)
5 kilograms of tea per basket

About Yunnan Sourcing View company

Company description not available.

2 Tasting Notes

143 tasting notes

Another unique and enjoyable tianjian from YS. The dried leaves are smallish and have a nice black cherry aroma and slight hint of pine wood charcoal. The tea soup is incredibly clear with a light yellow hue.

This one starts out like a black tea and gradually evolves into a sheng pu’er in later steeps without astringency or bitterness. It’s a bit more subtle in flavor than the other tianjians I’ve had. I picked up some fruity black tea, black cherry, stinging nettles, and pine resin. No noticeable smoky flavors here. This one has a nice granite/limestone mineral base that lasts throughout the session. The mouthfeel and textures are excellent here and get better with each steep, making it comparable to a nicer sheng pu’er. Good energy and longevity in these leaves too. I got over 10 full-flavored steeps and lost count.

I’ve noticed how tianjians evolve quite rapidly in almost every aspect, which is part of their charm. I’m glad I purchased 2 bags.

Login or sign up to leave a comment.