2014 Yunnan Sourcing Qing Mei Shan Old Arbor Pu-erh tea cake

Tea type
Pu-erh Tea
Ingredients
Not available
Flavors
Apple, Bitter, Brown Sugar, Citrus, Forest Floor, Fur, Herbaceous, Honey, Moss, Mushrooms, Nutty, Orange Zest, Plants, Potato, Sour, Sweet, Thick, Vegetables, Wood, Apricot, Stonefruit
Sold in
Not available
Caffeine
High
Certification
Not available
Edit tea info Last updated by Togo
Average preparation
205 °F / 96 °C 0 min, 15 sec 7 g 36 oz / 1072 ml

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3 Tasting Notes View all

  • “Qing Mei Shan is the only tea I have three different harvests of, so I may do a vertical comparison at some point. This note is just about the oldest of the three, one from 2014. At this stage in...” Read full tasting note
    88
  • “This is a nice puerh with a fair amount of bitterness in the early infusions. I also noticed a sour note for the first couple of steeps. This could be because this teat was dry stored in New York...” Read full tasting note
    85
  • “I purchased the 2015 version, which is a real treat. Tasting 2014 feels almost like cheating since I get to see how this tea’s sweetness evolves. Similar to the 2015, I get ripe apricots, sugar...” Read full tasting note
    92

From Yunnan Sourcing

Qing Mei Shan is a remote mountain area in Yong De county of Lincang. The tea trees here are 100-300 years old and have been growing wild for centuries. It’s a very pure tea with buttery thick mouthfeel, pungent floral can sugarcane aroma with an ass-kicking cha qi that betrays it’s wildness.
An amazing tea with strength and balance. Will be enjoyable to drink now and every day into the future.
Early April 2014 Harvest
400 grams per cake (7 cakes per bamboo tong)
This tea has been tested in certified laboratory and has passed the MRL limits for pesticide residues as established by the EU Food and Safety commission. For more information about MRL testing and the EU Food and Safety commission click on this link.

About Yunnan Sourcing View company

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3 Tasting Notes

88
632 tasting notes

Qing Mei Shan is the only tea I have three different harvests of, so I may do a vertical comparison at some point. This note is just about the oldest of the three, one from 2014. At this stage in its development, I find the mouthfeel and cha qi to be the highlights. The flavour seem to suffer a little bit from it being in a sort of transition stage.

Dry leaves smell of honey, orange peel, animal fur and garlic, but neither of those particularly stands out. During the session, I get mostly herbaceous aromas with notes of moss and plant roots.

The first infusion is very mineral with a light and airy mouthfeel and yet a very thick texture. It is a bit sweet and nutty with light forest and mushrooms notes. Second steep is woody, more bitter, and has a slightly sour finish. It is followed by a sweet, floral and cooling aftertaste that lasts for a very long time. Some of flavours that emerge include cabbage, potato pancakes, kumquat, apple, kiwi, brown sugar, and sunflower seeds.

The profile is very well balanced and even though none of the flavours are too memorable at present, I have little doubt that the tea has a bright future ahead. This is especially apparent from the very pleasant and defocusing cha qi and a great mouthfeel.

Song pairing: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YAqof9xXa_k

Flavors: Apple, Bitter, Brown Sugar, Citrus, Forest Floor, Fur, Herbaceous, Honey, Moss, Mushrooms, Nutty, Orange Zest, Plants, Potato, Sour, Sweet, Thick, Vegetables, Wood

Preparation
205 °F / 96 °C 0 min, 15 sec 7 g 4 OZ / 110 ML

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85
1758 tasting notes

This is a nice puerh with a fair amount of bitterness in the early infusions. I also noticed a sour note for the first couple of steeps. This could be because this teat was dry stored in New York for a few months before I decided to try it. After a few steeps a sweet note emerged in this tea. Pretty much the standard notes for young sheng, apricots and stonefruits I would say. Overall this is pretty good tea. It has an aftertaste that lasts a while. It is very pleasant in later steeps. As far as qi goes I didn’t feel any from this tea but I rarely feel qi from any tea so it does not surprise me that it is sadly missing. Maybe I’ll feel it as I finish my last cup who knows.

I steeped this tea twelve times in a 150ml gaiwan with 8.1g leaf and boiling water. I gave it a 10 second rinse. I steeped it for 5 sec, 5 sec, 7 sec, 10 sec, 15 sec, 20 sec, 25 sec, 30 sec, 45 sec, 1 min, 1.5 min, and 2 min. It had not weakened much in the twelfth steep, it would have gone a few more steeps but I had reached my caffeine limit for today.

Flavors: Apricot, Bitter, Stonefruit, Sweet

Preparation
Boiling 8 g 5 OZ / 150 ML
tanluwils

Cha qi for you is a bit like caffeine in coffee for me—no noticeable affects. I found the 2015 version to have a good amount of qi—enough to get me tipsy by the 4th infusion. It’s interesting how much it’s evolved since last year.

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92
143 tasting notes

I purchased the 2015 version, which is a real treat. Tasting 2014 feels almost like cheating since I get to see how this tea’s sweetness evolves. Similar to the 2015, I get ripe apricots, sugar plums, rock sugar, and a pungent orchid aroma at the bottom of the cup reminiscent of fragrant summer nights (heightened in the 2014). Later steeps reveal interesting textures, savory notes, and a spicy sweetness.

True to their description, Qing Mei Shans are extremely pure tasting and buttery. No doubt this material is well sourced. The cha qi gently sneaks in there, but is quite powerful once it takes hold. I’m feeling tea buzzed after the 4th steep. This tea great body and is expansive in the mouth. Wonderful mouth-feel and hui gan! It’s almost blissful. The aftertaste is very pleasant and persistent. Time will bring out more interesting textures and sophisticated sweetness from this tea.

Note: Previously, I’ve been using mouth feel and hui gan (returning sweetness) interchangeably, but I learned from drinking this tea that they are, in fact, quite different!

Progression notes 1 year since purchase:
This has become a better tea. It’s developing more complex and distinctive floral (honeysuckle), sweet wood (sandalwood and maple) and spice notes (peppercorn and arugula) with more pronounced cooling effects covering the tongue.

Preparation
205 °F / 96 °C 0 min, 15 sec 6 g 100 OZ / 2957 ML
mrmopar

I have 2 of these from 2013. Fantastic tea.

tanluwils

I find it odd that it’s barely mentioned. I wouldn’t have known about it had I not tried the 2013 sample.

boychik

I got 2015 and it’s fantastic. I also got a sample of 2013 to try. Do you know if 2013 spring or autumn. Based on wrapper I think it’s autumn but it doesn’t say harvest date any where. So the question now should I get one of each 2013, 2014, 2015 ? Lol

tanluwils

I asked Scott earlier in the year. It’s an autumn. Wonderful old arbor material. The 2013 went up $12 just as I was considering to purchase it. I prefer the energy and bite of spring teas anyway.

boychik

Shoot. I had to grab it during pre BF when I got 2015. Anyway, better to try it first

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