2004 CNNP "6515 Fang Cha in Box" Raw Pu-erh Tea

Tea type
Pu'erh Tea
Ingredients
Pu Erh Tea
Flavors
Astringent, Camphor, Mint
Sold in
Bulk
Caffeine
Not available
Certification
Not available
Edit tea info Last updated by TeaEarleGreyHot
Average preparation
Boiling 5 g 3 oz / 88 ml

Currently unavailable

We don't know when or if this item will be available.

From Our Community

2 Images

0 Want it Want it

1 Own it Own it

1 Tasting Note View all

  • “A very interesting pu-erh! Made of whole, rolled leaves that are olive-green once brewed. If I’m decoding the recipe “6515” correctly, they are considered grade 1 leaves, though I’m not entirely...” Read full tasting note
    65

From Yunnan Sourcing US

Produced by Menghai tea factory for CNNP company in 2004 for export to Malaysia. Composed entirely of early spring material from Menghai area plantation teas. An excellent tea with clean taste and good mouth-feel. Stored in Kunming since 2004.

250 grams of tea per brick

About Yunnan Sourcing US View company

Company description not available.

1 Tasting Note

65
61 tasting notes

A very interesting pu-erh! Made of whole, rolled leaves that are olive-green once brewed. If I’m decoding the recipe “6515” correctly, they are considered grade 1 leaves, though I’m not entirely sure what that means! Importantly, this tea is highly compressed. “Brick“ is the right description, and in fact if you tap on one side, the entire block resonates and almost rings as a ceramic block might. There are two consequences to this: firstly, it is very difficult to pick apart the tea to withdraw a brewing portion without creating a lot of crumbs and breakage, the leaves are so crisp. But even so, the leaf pieces were pretty big, once infused. Secondly, the tight compaction slows the aging, and this may explain the youthful vigor of the resulting tea. Or, maybe the storage since 2004 was on the dry side.

Youthful vigor! The fragrance was mild and pleasant without perfume, flowery, or fishiness. A bit of mintiness. The liquor packed a punch with slight bitterness, strong astringency (is this called “brisk”?) with mint and camphor, and a lingering aftertaste of green tea and a drying mouthfeel. The sixth steep was much like the first, with progressively longer infusions, starting at 20s, up to 2 min. Enjoyable now as a good morning wake-up brew. But I bet this brick will taste much nicer in another 15 years, if stored humidly.

Flavors: Astringent, Camphor, Mint

Preparation
Boiling 5 g 3 OZ / 88 ML
mrmopar

KunMing isn’t the best place to age tea for sure.

Login or sign up to leave a comment.