Jin Xiao Zhong Wuyi Black (Spring 2017)

Tea type
Black Tea
Ingredients
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Flavors
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Caffeine
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Certification
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Edit tea info Last updated by Girl Meets Gaiwan
Average preparation
205 °F / 96 °C 2 g 2 oz / 50 ml

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From Verdant Tea

Jin Guanyin is better known as a juicy and floral oolong tea, originally produced by grafting Huang Jin Gui onto Tieguanyin root stock. Though Huang Jin Gui and Tieguanyin are both most famous as Anxi varietals, the combined Jin Guanyin cultivar planted in Wuyi becomes something new and takes on the rocky minerality of the region’s terroir. The florals in this compelling and unique black tea are tempered by a savory finish from the Li Family’s expert Xiao Zhong processing techniques.

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2 Tasting Notes

78
4754 tasting notes

Eh, this black was just okay. Plenty malty and decent flavour, but honestly, I should probably stick to blacks that have chocolate as a flavour descriptor, since that’s my preference.

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76
38 tasting notes

(Gaiwan, 5 second first infusion, +5/10 sec ff, 12 steeps total)
Dry leaves are sweet – prune, cocoa, vanilla, and something bright (not quite citrus, maybe dried cherry?). Wet leaves add touch of wet foliage & woodsiness, and stronger dried fruit.
Steeps 1-2 are light amber color, taste is smooth & sweet with hints of chocolate and caramel, prune & vanilla. Steep 3 adds a tiny bit of aromatic woodsy flavor, bitterness, and dry finish. Steep 4 turns more complex – starts sweeter, with prune sweetening to caramelized date, but then the increasing dryness turns the smooth chocolate into cocoa powder. Pleasant lingering aftertaste of dried fruit. Steeps 5-8 pretty much keep these flavors, but the increasing dry tannins overshadow and sweetness recedes. Steeps 9-10 have touch of peaty/grassy flavor, and overall seem less fruity, less sweet, & feel thinner. But steep 11 surprises! Sweetness increases, and I have my first experience being tea drunk! Steep 12 is pushed out a little to 2 minutes, but flavors are all fading again.
Steeps 1-4 were my favorites, with yummy flavors & building complexity.

Next day tried western style – 2.5g in 120ml boiling water for 2 minutes. Lasted a few infusions. Pleasant with some of the flavors present in gongfu, but much less intense and not as interesting.

Preparation
205 °F / 96 °C 2 g 2 OZ / 50 ML

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