Mi Xiang Dark Roast Tieguanyin

Tea type
Oolong Tea
Ingredients
Oolong Tea Leaves
Flavors
Butter, Fruity, Honey, Nutty, Roasted, Smooth, Apricot, Blueberry, Celery, Cinnamon, Coffee, Coriander, Cream, Dark Wood, Grain, Lettuce, Mineral, Nutmeg, Parsley, Raisins, Toast, Vegetal, Wheat, Autumn Leaf Pile, Floral, Leather, Malt, Cherry, Peach, Rose
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Loose Leaf
Caffeine
Not available
Certification
Not available
Edit tea info Last updated by eastkyteaguy
Average preparation
195 °F / 90 °C 2 min, 45 sec 5 g 6 oz / 185 ml

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4 Tasting Notes View all

  • “TTB #14 I’m not usually the biggest fan of roasted oolongs, but this one is nice! A good balance of the nutty roasted notes with the honeyed floral flavor of the tea itself. The finish is super...” Read full tasting note
    90
  • “Hmm, another day in and I have plowed through yet another oolong sample. This was another tea I meant to get to sooner. That seems to be the story of my life these days, intend to do something, get...” Read full tasting note
    50
  • “I wish I loved the combination of roasted leaves and floral notes, but I don’t. This makes me think of happier roasts, like Intelligentsia Black Cat Classic Espresso; I’m not a coffee person but...” Read full tasting note
  • “Aroma starts as a very strong dried apricot, malt, light floral like rose, sherry. The liquor is very pale straw yellow, almost clear. Predominant flavors are sweet, peach/apricot, clover honey...” Read full tasting note
    80

From Verdant Tea

This tea premiered in our CSA-style Tea of the Month subscription club. “Mi Xiang” is literally honey fragrance, and a few sips give credence to the name. In other finishing styles, honey usually takes a backseat to more powerful florals and fruit flavors in Tieguanyin, but Master Zhang here has brought out the subtle, thick and rich honeyed quality of Tieguanyin through his precise roast. We have so much respect for Master Zhang’s values in roasting tea. So many workshops will roast to impart heavy handed roast flavor, and in doing so, burn their tea and compromise its original integrity. Master Zhang roasts slowly and with perfect precision so that even a tea this dark tastes only of itself and not of roasted flavor. The result is a tea full of honey, bread and elderberry, a cozy delight in cold months.

About Verdant Tea View company

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4 Tasting Notes

90
638 tasting notes

TTB #14

I’m not usually the biggest fan of roasted oolongs, but this one is nice! A good balance of the nutty roasted notes with the honeyed floral flavor of the tea itself. The finish is super smooth and not at all drying. This one may be staying with me!

Flavors: Butter, Fruity, Honey, Nutty, Roasted, Smooth

Preparation
190 °F / 87 °C 5 min, 0 sec 1 tsp 12 OZ / 354 ML

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50
888 tasting notes

Hmm, another day in and I have plowed through yet another oolong sample. This was another tea I meant to get to sooner. That seems to be the story of my life these days, intend to do something, get distracted, and then come back to it later. I haven’t felt particularly creative or inspired today, so let me just sum up everything I’m about to say by admitting that I found this tea to be merely okay overall.

I gongfued this one. No surprise there. After a quick rinse, I steeped 5 grams of loose tea leaves in 4 ounces of 208 F water for 6 seconds. This infusion was followed by 14 additional infusions. Steep times for those infusions were 9 seconds, 12 seconds, 16 seconds, 20 seconds, 25 seconds, 30 seconds, 40 seconds, 50 seconds, 1 minute, 1 minute 15 seconds, 1 minute 30 seconds, 2 minutes, 3 minutes, and 5 minutes.

Before I begin breaking this tea down, allow me to state for the record that my perception of this tea greatly differed from that of the vendor and at least one previous reviewer. Prior to the rinse, I picked up aromas of coffee, dark wood, honey wheat, roasted grain, plantain, dark fruit, and something vaguely vegetal. Just about everything I had read told me I should have picked up honey, but I didn’t. After the rinse, I noted slight vanilla bean, honey, elderberry, and dried blueberry scents as well as emerging aromas of parsley, coriander, and celery. There was some vague spiciness too. The first infusion brought out cinnamon, nutmeg, and a touch of raisin. The honey was a little stronger, but not much. In the mouth, the tea liquor was very savory. I immediately picked up dark wood, roasted grain, honey wheat toast, mild cinnamon, nutmeg, coffee, and plantain underscored by slight notes of vanilla, celery, elderberry, dried blueberry, parsley, honey, and coriander. Subsequent infusions brought out minerals, cream, butter, stewed apricot, and cooked leaf lettuce on the nose and in the mouth. Raisin and stronger vegetal notes also popped out in the mouth. Why was I not getting the strong honey impressions I was supposed to be getting? Later infusions seemed to emphasize minerals, dark wood, roasted grain, honey wheat toast, and vegetal aromas and flavors underscored by traces of cream, butter, indistinct fruit, and honey.

What happened here? Compared to some others, I almost felt like I was drinking an entirely different tea. What I expected to be very sweet, smooth, and honeyed actually ended up being toasty, grainy, woody, vegetal, and savory. For me, the honey was usually strongest right around the swallow, but even then it struck me as playing second fiddle to just about everything else going on in this tea. There were a couple infusions where it poked through for me, but it just wasn’t even close to being a dominant impression. Maybe it was just me. Maybe something was up with my sample. I don’t know. In the end, I could only really compare this to some of the other roasted Tieguanyins I have tried, and it did not compare all that favorably in my eyes. All I can say at this point is this tea didn’t quite do it for me, but I am also an outlier here.

Flavors: Apricot, Blueberry, Butter, Celery, Cinnamon, Coffee, Coriander, Cream, Dark Wood, Fruity, Grain, Honey, Lettuce, Mineral, Nutmeg, Parsley, Raisins, Toast, Vegetal, Wheat

Preparation
Boiling 5 g 4 OZ / 118 ML
CrowKettle

It’s nice to see a detailed review for this one from someone who didn’t just go “bah” with impatience (that was me). I didn’t get honey either.

Daylon R Thomas

That’s a shame with a Mi Xiang name.

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931 tasting notes

I wish I loved the combination of roasted leaves and floral notes, but I don’t. This makes me think of happier roasts, like Intelligentsia Black Cat Classic Espresso; I’m not a coffee person but that stuff is usually a success as long as someone else makes my cup.

Also, my leaves were totally not as fat or green as that image. Bitter Crowkettle.

Steep Count: 3

(2016 harvest)

Flavors: Autumn Leaf Pile, Floral, Leather, Malt, Roasted, Toast

Preparation
195 °F / 90 °C 5 g 4 OZ / 118 ML

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80
15 tasting notes

Aroma starts as a very strong dried apricot, malt, light floral like rose, sherry. The liquor is very pale straw yellow, almost clear. Predominant flavors are sweet, peach/apricot, clover honey with a touch of astringency as the number of steeps increases. Eventually the aroma adds notes of dry autumn leaves and minerals, and then starts to fade around the fifth steeping. Flavors are pretty consistent throughout, adding sweetness, minerals, and a touch of vegetal something in the background. The aftertaste is almost unreal, lasting practically forever, and can make further steeps seem to lose flavor though I suspect it’s taste desensitization from the near continuous aftertaste. It’s very sweet, honey and apricots, and just lingers on.

Wonderful tea for a contemplative afternoon.

180F, 150ml Gaiwan, 30s x3, 60s xN, 5g

Flavors: Apricot, Autumn Leaf Pile, Cherry, Floral, Honey, Malt, Mineral, Peach, Rose, Vegetal

Preparation
180 °F / 82 °C 0 min, 30 sec 5 g 5 OZ / 150 ML

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