1980s Liu Bao Guangxi

Tea type
Pu-erh Tea
Ingredients
Not available
Flavors
Not available
Sold in
Not available
Caffeine
Not available
Certification
Not available
Edit tea info Last updated by Dexter
Average preparation
Not available

Currently unavailable

We don't know when or if this item will be available.

From Our Community

1 Image

0 Want it Want it

1 Own it Own it

2 Tasting Notes View all

  • “puerh from this morning courtesy of dexter not a lot to say about this one beyond it’s really earthy and not quite the sort of puerh I love. it was tasty, but the earthiness was a little...” Read full tasting note
    78
  • “This was my tea of choice at work today. This is by far the oldest pu’erh I’ve had. The aged pu’erh I was drinking yesterday was really mellow and smooth. I was expecting this one to be more of...” Read full tasting note

From Tealux

Tealux is delighted to be able to offer you this Liu Bao Pu Erh Guangxi, which really is something special! Grown and harvested during the 1980’s, a full 30 years ago, the leaves have been aged to perfection while carefully stored and monitored.

Matured in bamboo baskets in the usual manner of post-oxidizing Pu Erh teas, 1980’s Liu Bao Pu Erh Guangxi is as unique and distinctive a tea as you can imagine, and is famed and much sought after for its medicinal properties, unmistakable aroma and of course, its venerable age!

Liu Bao Pu Erh Guangxi is renowned for its medicinal and curative properties, and is said to energise the body, increase stamina and aid in digestion. It can also help with the breakdown of fat enzymes and help to combat water retention.

When steeped in hot water, 1980’s Liu Bao Pu Erh Guangxi produces a rich, intensely earthy flavor with notes of spice, leather and bark and a clear, silky fullness. It can be steeped five times or more without bitterness, to unlock the full depth, complexity and age of the leaves. Truly a must-have tea for any genuine tea connoisseur!

About Tealux View company

Company description not available.

2 Tasting Notes

78
10344 tasting notes

puerh from this morning courtesy of dexter not a lot to say about this one beyond it’s really earthy and not quite the sort of puerh I love. it was tasty, but the earthiness was a little overwhelming in the initial steeps. It mellows out!

Login or sign up to leave a comment.

1040 tasting notes

This was my tea of choice at work today. This is by far the oldest pu’erh I’ve had. The aged pu’erh I was drinking yesterday was really mellow and smooth. I was expecting this one to be more of the same. NOT.
This is really BOLD, EARTHY (not fishy), and a hint of something that seems minty to me. I don’t do mint, but that’s what it reminds me of. The hotter this is the more minty it is, as it cools it becomes more like a “traditional” pu’erh but it’s big and bold and in your face. There is nothing offensive here, but this isn’t my favorite. I like the one I was drinking yesterday much better.

JC

Aged Puerh, Heicha and other similar aged teas like Liu Bao and Liu An develop ‘camphor’, the ‘minty’ taste/sensation. I’d recommend sticking to younger ones and you’ll avoid the camphor notes for the most part. Good note :)

Dexter

Thanks for the info. I’m feeling a little “yay I got it right” – mint seemed weird to me. The other thing I didn’t mention – should add it, was how “clear” this was. It was a light brown color, but CLEAR – if you had handed me a cup, I would have thought dark oolong – that’s what the liquor looked like. Most pu’erh is more opaque. This was strange for me – but a good learning experience. Thank you for your comments.

JC

Ah, Ripe Puerh is usually opaque during its younger days, as it gets older it gets cleaner and shows from a ‘clean’ brown or burgundy color. Shengs should start clear but light in color and later get darker hues of amber into bronze and later into burgundy/brown colors as it ages, but should never turn opaque/cloudy/murky since it would most likely mean bad storage conditions or just low quality material. Tea is awesome!

TeaKlutz

This is really interesting. Was this a sheng or a shu?

Dexter

Shrug – I know nothing – I thought this was a shu, but I just did a little research (very little of which I understood) and from what I’m reading this is processed “usual manner of post-oxidizing Pu Erh”, but to be called pu’erh it has to be from Yunnan – I don’t think this is Yunnan and therefor not even really pu’erh. That might be splitting hairs – like it’s sparkling wine unless it’s from Champagne France…. is it shu or sheng… not sure at this point.
I have a lot of tea, I love a lot of tea, but I am really uneducated about what I’m drinking. I just agree with JC – Tea is awesome!

TeaKlutz

That’s right, Dexter, the most important part of drinking tea is enjoying it! :D

JC

Sheng and Shu are inside the ‘Puerh’ catergory. We also have Heicha, the ‘real’ black tea of China and basically Puerh would be a Heicha if it wasn’t that it got ‘big’ enough to be it’s own category and defined its distinct processing and overall requirements to be called Puerh (like Dexter mentioned, like Champagne France or Cognac, it has to be from a certain region).

Liu An and Liu Bao are basically another type of Heicha, but they are also defined by their own requirements like origin and overall process and even aging methods. I’m not too educated on Liu An or Liu Bao, but they are both very interesting tea and have distinct traits.

Login or sign up to leave a comment.