Tea type
Oolong Tea
Ingredients
Not available
Flavors
Creamy, Flowers, Sweet
Sold in
Loose Leaf
Caffeine
Not available
Certification
Not available
Edit tea info Last updated by TeaNecromancer
Average preparation
185 °F / 85 °C 0 min, 30 sec 5 g 43 oz / 1275 ml

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5 Tasting Notes View all

  • “A very nice creamy, floral green oolong. After western style and gongfu sessions, I preferred western’s somewhat zoomed-out effect, with a greater range of texture and flavor coming together in...” Read full tasting note
  • “Thanks to Zennenn, I am able to try one of the teas from this company finally :) Tea Truth from Andrew: Drinking tea has cycles about it just like the seasons in the year. During the winter one...” Read full tasting note
  • “Picked up this tea during the Black Friday sale. This is a nice jade oolong that’s similar to many Taiwanese high mountain teas. It’s sweet, a little tart, and lightly floral. After...” Read full tasting note
    85
  • “I decided to commune with the spirits in the wee hours, so I broke out my newly arrived Ta Oolong from Tea From Vietnam and started a session right at midnight. The instructions on...” Read full tasting note

From Tea From Vietnam

The Ta oolong tea is the only oolong variety in Vietnam that truly originated from our country. In Vietnamese, ‘ta’ means “our” or “us” which usually used to express anything that has Vietnam origin. And the Ta tea cultivar has been with our people for thousand of years.

Taiwanese tea producers have invested a many of oolong tea plantations in Vietnam since early 1990s. In those days, they also brought some of their newly developed oolong varieties such as Jin Xuan (Golden Tiger Lily), Si Ji Chun (Four Seasons) and Cu Yu (Jade Pearl) into Vietnam and grew those varieties in their plantations. These tea cultivars are developed to have higher production, high insect resistance and more adaptable to new conditions. While the Ta cultivar has lower production and insect resistance, it was soon replaced by the new cultivars even by Vietnamese oolong tea farmers.

Fortunately, the tea hasn’t extinct yet. Our Ta oolong comes from a small garden in Lam Ha, a high land district that has every ideal conditions for growing oolong tea. There are only a few of these gardens left in the region and we do try our best to preserve those. And it’s not all about preserving history, the tea is truly amazing that worth the effort!

Tasting Notes:
– very floral: rain forest orchids
– slightly vegetal
– sweet: honeysuckle
– smooth

About Tea From Vietnam View company

Company description not available.

5 Tasting Notes

28 tasting notes

A very nice creamy, floral green oolong. After western style and gongfu sessions, I preferred western’s somewhat zoomed-out effect, with a greater range of texture and flavor coming together in each cup.

Thank you Zennenn for the opportunity to enjoy Ta!

Preparation
175 °F / 79 °C 0 min, 30 sec 1 tsp 6 OZ / 177 ML
Zennenn

Glad you are enjoying it!

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1112 tasting notes

Thanks to Zennenn, I am able to try one of the teas from this company finally :)

Tea Truth from Andrew:
Drinking tea has cycles about it just like the seasons in the year. During the winter one drinks a strong cup of shou or a yancha to keep warm, while in the spring a cup of sencha or dragonwell makes the grass seem vibrant even though taste does no such thing. While these seasons are not needed to enjoy the tea that they compliment so well, it is nice to pair tea with the seasons.

This winter I have been drinking a lot of yancha and drinking a cup of this reminded me of how happy I was when Beautiful Taiwan Tea finally sent out the packages from their Kickstarter. This tea took me back in time a bit and reminded me that there is only a few more months until I am back to drinking my favorite tea from the newer harvest; green oolongs :)

This was a pleasant tea with a tad of cream mixed with the buttery texture. The tea is tightly rolled so it needs time to unravel, gongfu was a bit of a trick with this one. With six steeps out of this, it was rather enjoyable.

Rasseru

Me as well.

March – Yin Zhen
April – Feng Huang
May – Tie Guan Yin

Its a good thing, I’m going to finish off all my Yinzhen which is running out & not buy any more. I’m hoping its a good season & no drought

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85
406 tasting notes

Picked up this tea during the Black Friday sale. This is a nice jade oolong that’s similar to many Taiwanese high mountain teas. It’s sweet, a little tart, and lightly floral. After experimenting with steeping parameters, I found the best results came from a high leaf to water ratio, short infusions, and lower temperature about 185-195. It’s prone to bitterness if oversteeped or too hot water is used.

I got eight good infusions following the gongfu instructions on Tea from Vietnam’s site, and it still had a lot left to give. The tea is somewhat light bodied and while it does have a floral background, it wasn’t as flowery as I had hoped. There are subtle notes of lily floating in the aroma and finish, but it’s not a flower bomb like say a TGY or shui xian. I noticed the picking date on the package was January 2015. Perhaps some of that floral goodness had faded by the time I got my hands on it 11 months later?

Overall, a pretty darn good if not stellar tea that’s worth trying if oolong is your thing.

Flavors: Creamy, Flowers, Sweet

Preparation
190 °F / 87 °C 0 min, 30 sec 4 g 120 OZ / 3548 ML
Zennenn

It’s more comforting than flashy, isn’t it?

LuckyMe

Definitely, it’s my go-to after meal tea these days

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41 tasting notes

I decided to commune with the spirits in the wee hours, so I broke out my newly arrived Ta Oolong from Tea From Vietnam and started a session right at midnight.

The instructions on teafromvietnam.com only listed Western brewing and I was in the mood for a long gong fu session so I winged it by putting 5 grams of these little pearls in my 100ml gaiwan and steeped it 12 times at 10/10/10/15/20/25/30/45/60/120 seconds, finishing with 3 and 5 minute steeps as the leaves gave out. By mid-session the leaves expanded to fill the gaiwan. Many of them were intact and quite large.

The dry leaf reminded me of fresh cut grass. Once warmed, aromas of buttered popcorn, florals and sweetness emerged. About ten minutes after the 5 second rinse these turned to strong tart and sweet fruits with moderate florals.

Time to get busy! The first steep was a very pale greenish-yellow and smelled of sweet cream butter and florals.

BTW I’m not familiar with flower aromas so my notes are vague in that area. If you want a really good breakdown of which flower types are present in this tea you should read Amanda Wilson’s post on it here: http://steepster.com/SoggyEnderman/posts/316753. She can tell you not only what type of flower but also what month she smelled it and the type of soil it grew in. I’m exaggerating (slightly) of course, but she does have a great nose and a way with words.

So, back to the first steep. The body is very light but the flavors are distinct, with a buttery and lively mouthfeel. There’s a slight citrus tang with sugar sweetness, stonefruits and floral notes in the retro-nasal exhale. It feels like this tea is still opening up.

Subsequent steeps increase in body although it remains light, the liquid becomes a light yellow, the mouthfeel turns creamy and the flavors intensify to a moderate level. The main notes I find in the cup are tart citrus, sugar sweetness, stonefruits and spice, with the occasional appearance of buttered bread and fruity notes. There’s a moderate amount of florals in the retro-nasal exhale across all steeps. The first ten steeps were the best. The last two long steeps had a mild astringency and the flavors began to fade.

I felt the energy in this tea mainly in my heart and head, and it left me with a calm and clear mind. I usually drink roasted or aged oolongs, not having found a jade that really “wows” me. This one, however, turned my head. In spite of the light body the flavors, aromas and energy struck me in a most enjoyable way. I bought 50 grams so there’s plenty left to revisit this, and I will.

Pix: http://instagram.com/p/9Rx4KHli0j

Preparation
185 °F / 85 °C 5 g 3 OZ / 100 ML
boychik

Amanda is awesome at picking all the flavors. I know one more person who goes into such detailed notes and each steep is described . It’s yyz.

TeaExplorer

Of course. And I’m probably forgetting several other reviewers as well.

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I’ve only tried one Vietnamese black & it was quite pleasant. I shared it with my cousin who is a Vietnam vet, who said the Vietnamese allies were never without tea, and they drank it Grandpa style from big plastic (not so clean looking) jugs. Proof, I think, that one’s need for tea is unstoppable. I will definitely visit this vendor’s site.

TeaExplorer

That was my first tea of any kind from Vietnam. I stumbled across it in the post by Amanda ‘SoggyEnderman’ Wilson that I referenced in my review.

I ordered that and the Gui Fei (not tasted yet), 50 grams each, $11.90 apiece + shipping. Arrived via air mail in about 3 weeks.

Their web site has been broken for days. The main page loads, but all links yield a 404 error. I emailed them about it two days ago, but no response so far. Hopefully they are just on vacation or something.

pixel

Yes. Could not find the site you referenced online via search on my phone. Let me know if you find it again, please.

TeaExplorer

Will do :)

pixel

Thanks! Steep well;-)

TeaExplorer

The TeaFromVietnam web site is still broken (been down for a week now). No response to my email. Will keep checking periodically.

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Thanks for checking. I’m trying to broaden my black tea knowledge and experience beyond China and India. I wish I had been on Steeper when I had that Vietnamese tea, so I would have tasting notes to jog my memory.

TeaExplorer

The teafromvietnam.com web site came back on line a short while ago.

pixel

Thanks. I’m about to check out!

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921 tasting notes

You know what, I can’t wait til Monday. Apparently my new camera will be delivered then…oh, did I not mention I got a new camera? Well, I was able to make some money and I used that to buy a refurbished Fujifilm S8600, it is not my first choice (really wanted one of those fancy multi-lenses pro $700+ cameras) but with mine dying, the time for saving up for the one I wanted has passed. The new one will be a significant upgrade over my Fujifilm S1800, specifically it has a slimmer profile (unless I unleash the MASSIVE zoom) meaning my tiny hands can grip the thing better for some epic pouring tea photos. The search for the illusive perfect mid-air droplet shot continues.

Today we are looking at another tea from Tea from Vietnam, specifically Ta Oolong, an oolong that is very uniquely Vietnamese! This is a native oolong, having been grown there for thousands of years, most likely originating as wild grown tea trees of the same stock found growing wild in Yunnan, the place where tea originated. Tea trees are so rude when it comes to borders, they tend to ignore it and wander off to other places. In the 90s a bunch of Taiwanese teas were brought into Vietnam, slowly pushing the Ta Oolong to only be grown in a few small gardens, this one came from a garden in Lam Ha. The aroma of the pretty green leaves is very floral with a hint of sweet cream. Notes of orchid, honeysuckle, osmanthus, spicebush, and a touch of hyacinth and lilies, I feel like I walked into a summer garden or flower filled conservatory. I might have spent more time inhaling the floral explosion than is necessary.

This is a tea that calls for my Xi Shi Yixing Teapot, yeah it is named after that Xi Shi, inspired by her probably very perfect bosom, what with being one of China’s great beauties. The leaves, now steeped and unfurled a bit, are a wonderfully flowery explosion, notes of orchids, lilies, honeysuckle and hyacinth are the main flowers, with a gentle crushed vegetation finish. The liquid is honey sweet and creamy, and very, very heady. It is like a garden in full bloom in my cup, just want to sniff and sniff…and yes I dipped my nose in the tea again, it was inevitable.

First steeping, oh it is a creamy thing, the oolong’s mouthfeel is definitely a thick one, coating the mouth with its texture, and I am totally ok with that. The taste starts out green and a bit buttery but that is very quickly shoved out of the way by a small storm of flowers. If you are imagining a cloud of petals that also rain flower nectar you are on the right track. Notes of lilies (giving a touch of spice) honeysuckles, orchids and osmanthus bloom in my mouth, with a lingering honey aftertaste.

On we go to steep two, the aroma is creamy and sweet, I managed to not dip my nose while sniffing the flowery sweetness. This time the lily note is very present in the aroma, giving it a gentle spiciness. The mouthfeel is still buttery and thick, and very well rounded. The taste skips over the green note and goes straight into the flowery explosion, so many notes of flowers, lilacs, osmanthus, lilies, and honeysuckles, finishing out with a creamy sweetness.

The third steep brings in more of the lily spicy notes, strong floral and honey with a wonderful spicy note that lingers through and through. The mouthfeel still has that buttery texture that I have come to expect, though it is a touch lighter this time. The taste starts out with a touch of green, similar to the first steep, like crushed fresh vegetation. This moves to sweet honeysuckles and nicely strong lilies whose floral spiciness lingers for quite some time. Many steeps were had.

For blog and photos: http://ramblingbutterflythoughts.blogspot.com/2015/09/tea-from-vietnam-ta-oolong-tea-review.html

Equusfell

Oh lordy. This tea sounds like my kind of tea! I must experience this ‘small storm of florals’!

TeaExplorer

I’d never heard of Ta Oolong until now. Read your blog entry on it – very intriguing. Just placed an order for the Ta and their Gui Fei. Thanks!

Equusfell

Do you mind posting a link to their website? I couldn’t find them because the name is so generic!

TeaNecromancer

Sure! Here is their website :D http://teafromvietnam.com/

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