Tea type
Fruit Green Herbal Blend
Ingredients
Not available
Flavors
Blueberry, Oatmeal, Dried Fruit, Dry Grass, Hay, Honey, Jam, Oats, Smooth, Sweet, Grass
Sold in
Loose Leaf
Caffeine
Medium
Certification
Not available
Edit tea info Last updated by Cameron B.
Average preparation
175 °F / 79 °C 2 min, 0 sec 14 oz / 414 ml

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3 Tasting Notes View all

  • “Just booked flights for one of two trips to western US National Parks today. This first trip this year will be the Grand Tetons and Yellowstone. I’ve been to both before and I’m excited to take...” Read full tasting note
    42
  • “Yay, more National Parks! This one is a green tea with blueberry, currant, cornflower, and oatstraw. I admit, I don’t think I’ve ever had oatstraw? Dry scent is deliciously blueberry with a bit...” Read full tasting note
    88

From Simpson & Vail

Known as the Crown Jewel of the North Atlantic Coast, Acadia is filled with a plethora of unique scenery. Cadillac Mountain is the tallest mountain in the park and on the North Atlantic Seaboard. It is rumored that this is the first place you can see the sunrise in the US. Despite only covering less than one percent of Maine’s land area, Acadia is known to harbor over 50% of the vascular plants growing in Maine. 20% of the park is classified as wetlands and in each of these wetland areas at least one rare plant grows. Acadia may be the fifth smallest national park by land area in the U.S., but is among the top ten most visited, hosting more than 2 million people each year.

History:
Acadia is one of the first parks to be made up of primarily donated land from those who believed in preserving the area. George B Dorr devoted his life to the preservation of Acadia; he depleted most of his savings to buy multiple properties on Mt. Desert Island in order to donate it. John D. Rockefeller Jr. & other wealthy conservationists also played a huge role in creating what we know today as Acadia by donating their land to the park. Rockefeller also funded construction of roughly forty-five miles of carriage roads that run throughout the park. The roads use native materials and are landscaped around the vegetation in the park including blueberry bushes and sweet ferns. In 1916, President Wilson first declared the land Sieur de Monts National Monument, Dorr continued to acquire land and push for national park status. In 1919, Acadia was renamed, and Lafayette National Park Act was signed making it the first national park east of the Mississippi River. In 1929, the same year Simpson & Vail was incorporated, Lafayette National Park received an official name change to Acadia National Park. This change was to honor the former French colony that included Maine.

If you happen to stumble downeast to the small town of Bar Harbor you will most likely be treated to a myriad of blueberry foods, the fruit most associated with the state. Crafting a blend for this park therefore naturally started with a blueberry base. We chose a green tea to highlight the blueberry flavor in honor of the lush greenery found in Acadia. Ultimately creating a golden cup that imparts a light, delicate infusion with a full blueberry flavor and a subtle citrus finish.

Ingredients: Green tea, currants, blueberry flavor, oatstraw and blue cornflower petals.

About Simpson & Vail View company

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3 Tasting Notes

42
118 tasting notes

Just booked flights for one of two trips to western US National Parks today. This first trip this year will be the Grand Tetons and Yellowstone. I’ve been to both before and I’m excited to take some Girl Scouts to explore.

Today, I’m finishing off Acadia. I am reminded of a pancake parlor in Norther NH. They make the best blueberry oat pancakes. I really hope I get to go up there this summer. As a tea though, I don’t find it exciting. I think as much as I love blueberries, I don’t care for the flavor in my teas. Maybe I haven’t found the “right” one though. Just means I need to keep trying. It’s not bad though, I’m just unlikely to purchase it again.

Flavors: Blueberry, Oatmeal

Preparation
180 °F / 82 °C 2 min, 0 sec
gmathis

What a brave soul you are! What age range are your scouts?

Jen vB

Our Ambassador Girl Scouts are in their Junior Year of high school and have been planning this since 2019.
I also have a Daisy troop. Lifetime GS myself!

gmathis

Both ends of the age spectrum! Sal—oot!

Jen vB

True!
I thought I was done with my GS Volunteering but then my own daughter wanted to try. So I’m starting all over again.

gmathis

Fifth and sixth grade is my volunteer teaching wheelhouse and weekly gig, but for short spurts, it’s fun to change to a different age. I tend to trend down instead of up. Any way to turn a tea party into a badge opportunity?

Jen vB

Well our Daisy troop is using their Cookie Money on Build A Bear…. sooooo Teddy Bear Tea Party is in my calendar. :-)

mrmopar

Yellowstone wow!

Michelle

The Gros Ventre camp ground at Grand Teton has a daily moose sighting at sunset. Just ask at check in for the campsite numbers and follow the crowd of photographers.

Jen vB

Thanks for the tip! In all my trips up north, I’ve only seen a moose once. In the dark, off a highway!

Michelle

Oh, and there are a few elk that hangout in the grassy areas near the visitor center in Mammoth. Kinda weird to see elk that close to humans and not really care. I’d be happy to chat about either park if you had questions I might be able to answer, I live about 1.5 hrs from the east gate of Yellowstone.

Jen vB

Such a beautiful area of the country. I’ve been out there twice. Once backpacking for 2 weeks and once touristing (Yellowstone, Grand Teton, and Glacier). I’m looking forward to going back.

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88
3051 tasting notes

Yay, more National Parks!

This one is a green tea with blueberry, currant, cornflower, and oatstraw. I admit, I don’t think I’ve ever had oatstraw? Dry scent is deliciously blueberry with a bit of a toasty grain aroma that makes me think of Corn Nuts. Is that the oatstraw? (shrugs)

Yum yum yum yum yum! Sorry, I’m really liking the blueberry here. It reminds me of those dried blueberries that I used to eat in Blueberry Morning cereal (do they still make that…?) or even blueberry jam. Very syrupy sweet, concentrated, and rich with none of the slight tartness of a fresh blueberry. The green base is extremely mellow, just subtly dry grassy and smooth. I’m not sure about the oatstraw? I can taste something that could be oat, but that could just be part of the green tea itself. Anyway, there’s a bit of hay-oat thing going on.

So really happy with this one! It makes me so happy when these teas are yummy, because the packaging is so pretty that it would be a shame if they were all duds…

https://www.instagram.com/p/CM3FaY-hDvn/

Flavors: Blueberry, Dried Fruit, Dry Grass, Hay, Honey, Jam, Oats, Smooth, Sweet

Preparation
175 °F / 79 °C 2 min, 0 sec 3 tsp 16 OZ / 473 ML
gmathis

This sounds good! I’ve had barley tea a time or two…I bet your oat straw is similar…and Corn Nuts was a good comparison.

Cameron B.

Oddly, I didn’t really get that flavor in the taste? (shrug)

Cameron B.

Also, I love barley tea!

tea-sipper

oh goodie, a decent blueberry tea to try at some point.

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